Friday, December 4, 2015

That cold black magic; Homer's odyssey to the state of Troy; "What hath DOD wrought?"; Getting into game shape; We've been counting beans

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER e5 + pi4 SERVED

Welcome to Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!, the Fourth of Duodecimber edition.

Okay, now that “Cold Turkey Day,” also known as “Black Friday,” is behind us (both also known as the day after Thanksgiving Day), we will put a cap on Undecimber (also known as November) by posing a puzzle morsel involving the words “COLD” and “BLACK.”

 Rounding out this week’s five-square-meal-menu offerings are a national newsy appetizer, a business newsy entrée slice, a gamy entrée slice, and a dessert hot off the griddle. Please enjoy:

Morsel Menu
 
Hooking Up Morsel:

The day after Thanksgiving Day is known as both Black Friday and Cold Turkey Day. Solve the following posers involving “Cold” and “Black.” All my intended answers are one syllable long (except for #7 which is two syllables long) and involve “hooking up” other words with “cold” and/or “black.” These other words follow or precede cold or black to form two-word phrases or two-syllable compound words. One of my compound words is a proper noun.

1. Name a word that follows black that rhymes with cold. (I have one answer.)  
2. Name a word that follows cold that rhymes with black. (I have one answer.)
3. Name a word that follows cold and also follows black. (I have one answer.)
4. Name a word that precedes cold and also precedes black. (I have no answer, no clue, nada.)
5. Name a word that follows black but can also precede cold. (I have three answers.)
6. Name a word that follows cold but can also precede black. (I have one answer.)
7. Name a word that follows black or cold to form two song titles. The “Black _____” title was a big hit, released in the 20th century, for a mainstream pop-rock group. The “Cold _____” title was a “deep cut” on an album by a European singer-songwriter’s debut album, released in the 21st century. (I have one title for each song.)

Hint: The first name of the group and the first name of the singer begin with the same letter. The second word in the group’s name and the surname of the singer could both be lower-cased and used as common nouns.
  
Appetizer Menu

Bikes And Butts Appetizer:
“What hath DOD wrought”

Name a brand name of cigarettes that is also a brand name of bicycles. Place punctuation marks after the first two letters, capitalize the second letter, and change the third letter to a letter eight times more valuable in the game of Scrabble. Leave a space between the second and third letters to form a movie title (from a decade that is an acronym of an anagram of “Einstein”) which has come to be used sometimes as a slang term for the subject of a national policy story appearing this past week in the news.

Name two other words that comprise the gist of the story, beginning with a W and a C. Name the country, beginning with an N, where essentially this same story was written in newspapers 30 years ago. Rearrange the letters in these two words and country to form a four-word derisive phrase that someone who disagrees with the policy might use to describe an example of what the policy, when enacted, may well shall hath wrought.

What is the movie title/slang term? What are the three words and the four-word phrase that they form?

Hint: The two-syllable surname of a person who might privately utter the four-word derisive phrase,” if divided into two words, would be an accurate adjective-noun caption for the automobile pictured here. (The adjective describes the color of the auto, a three-letter word.) The four-word derisive phrase might look something like this:
“__ __ __   __   __ __ __ __ __ __   __ __ __ __ __ __ __!?

Hint: The person who might utter the four-word derisive phrase may also utter a two-word defiant phrase that can be formed by removing a letter from the interior of the country that begins with an N, leaving the space where it is,and tacking an exclamation mark onto the end.


MENU

Business News Slice:
We’ve been countin’ beans

“Scorers cry, ‘Addable money!’”

Rearrange the letters the statement above to form four words (two pairs of words) that appeared on the business sections of newspapers this past week.

What are these four words?

Power Of Three Slice:
Getting into game shape

Name a piece of equipment used in a game, in two words. Apply to the end of the first word the consonant sound that begins the second word. The first word now sounds like the shape, not of the second word but, of another piece of gaming equipment that makes contact with a surface similar – in color and texture – to the surface with which the original piece of gaming equipment comes into contact.

What are these two pieces of gaming equipment, and their shapes?

Hint: Compute (raise) each of the following numbers to its third power:
17, 3, 21, 5, 2, 1, 12

Dessert Menu

Grand Slam Dessert:
Homer’s odyssey to the state of Troy

“Grid yards, arm, racer do gore Lions… Rah Rah!”

The above headline may have appeared in “homer” newspapers’ sports pages originating in the upper Midwest this past week. Rearrange the letters to form six words that would have appeared in the news story beneath the homer headline.

The six words consist of five proper nouns and a verb. What are they?  

 Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!


Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Tuesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

59 comments:

  1. I got some of the HUM and some of the BABS. There is at least one other bicycle/cigarette common brand name with a one point scrabble 3rd letter that I thought of first.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I have HUM except 7, POTS, and a bicycle/cigarette of BABA.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For HUM 4. [4. Name a word that precedes cold and also precedes black.], I have two answers!

      Delete
    2. ron, you are a better man than I, to the power of two! Thank you for rising to this challenge and clearing the bar with air to spare.

      LegoIs”PitchCold”ACommercialForCoorsLightBeer?

      Delete
  3. Hints please! I do have the POTS, but the cold and black answers are especially tricky.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,

      Hints for you:
      BUMS:
      1. Soul Asylum
      2. An arrogant egotist might try applying this to his head
      3. Something you might take a shot of, and something you might shoot
      4. Ask ron for a clue!
      5. The letters in my three answers can be rearranged to form a COOTIES TUNE.
      6. Two-word computer jargon/Footwear-care product
      7. The first name of the group and the first name of the singer begin with the letter D.
      BABA:
      The Bikes and Butts are both French
      BNS:
      The four words:
      1. Word that sounds like the sound a frustrated person makes followed by the sound a freezing person makes
      2. The surname of a guy who once “rescued” a burning American flag
      3. “Rubber Soul,” for example
      4. Homophone of the surname of the creator of “Passion Fish”
      GSD:
      The headline and story would have appeared in this morning’s (Friday morning’s) newspapers.

      LegoNiceWorkOnPOTSpjb!

      Delete
  4. Good evening, fellow puzzling fans (and author)! I've read literally only the Morsel so far, and have answers for all by #4. I'm sure #1 is correct (although I have a second answer for that one, too), as is #2; have only two answers for #5 (haven't found a third to try to anagram to song title for whoever The Cooties are) and I got #7 (with Lego's nice hint to pjb, and search engine aid, since as usual, I was unfamiliar completely) as well.

    But #3 (for which I found three answers, one of which however is NOT just one syllable) doesn't seem to fit with the hint above (taking a shot?) and my #6 answer doesn't have anything to do with either computer jargon or footwear, as far as I know.

    I suspect this Morsel will be rich in alternate replies by next Tuesday!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Oh, exultation!! I finally, finally worked out the four-words for the Business News Slice.

    Now, Lego, I have a question about the Appetizer's Scrabble tile value statement. Did you really intend to say that the new tile should have a value eight times AS valuable [1 x 8 = 8], rather than eight times MORE valuable , i.e., 1 + (1 x 8) = 9] which would mean tile value clearly doesn't exist.)

    I've gotten the movie, the two words and the "N" country, but to my annoyance, can't work the anagram out. Thought I had the first two (short) words, but then couldn't do anything with the rest. The car photo, sadly, hasn't helped. I had another three-letter word idea, but can't get anywhere with that idea either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are correct, as usual, ViolinTedditor. I was struggling and sinking within a “more/as morass”! “Eight times MORE valuable” is accurate, and “eight times AS valuable” is sloppy sleepy writing.

      The two-word car photo caption consists of a somewhat obscure color that rhymes with, but shares but one letter with, an integer from 1 to 10, and a make (not model) of an automobile. Those to words form the surname of the reluctant fellow who was indeed recently given a plum appointment.
      Congrats on cracking the BNS.

      LegoEightTimesLessSmartThanViolinTeddy!

      Delete
    2. At the risk of sounding like I am trying to beat you up (which is NOT NOT NOT what I intend, our dear LegoLeader), I think you still mixed it up in the comment above...you MEANT, I assume, to type " 'Eight times AS valuable' is correct," etc.....your poor brain must still be tired!

      Thanks for the car hints...I shall set to work trying again.

      YourReluctantButEverWellMeaningTedditor

      Delete
    3. VT, If I were my late Dad, who lost his hair in his 30s, I would say, "My bald tired cranium needs retreads!" But I am not, so I will just say...

      LegoIfYouCanSeeLincoln'sCraniumYourTiresMayBeBald

      Delete
  6. VT is right. The anagram part of that one is tough. I'm not sure of the W and C words in that one either, so I can't get the rest. I'm also not sure about the sports-related anagram either. May need a few more hints, please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,
      BABA:
      The W word = 5 letters. The C word = 6 letters. The N country name = 6 letters. To form the “two-word defiant phrase,” remove the third letter from the country name. Thus the phrase takes the form:
      “___ ___
      ___ ___ ___!”

      GSD:
      Regarding the “six words that would have appeared in the news story beneath the homer headline:”

      Two of the five proper nouns are the same word.
      Three of the five proper nouns begin with the same letter.
      One of the five proper nouns crops up in Exodus and is the surname of a prolific “homer” and “grand slam” hitter.
      One of the five proper nouns has letters that can be rearranged to form a branch of the armed services, the first three letters of which appear consecutively in the headline.
      The verb has a homonym (spelled and pronounced the same) that is a noun often described as “ping-pong-ball-sized,” formerly described as “golf-ball-sized,” but seldom described as“beachball-sized.”

      LegoAndThat’sThisMorning’sWeatherForecast…

      Delete
    2. I'm exhausted! Thanks ONLY to your hints above, and some painful searching and battling, I've FINALLY come up with the six words for the Grand Slam Dessert.

      At first, was completely confused re the "two the same" and the 'three with same beginning letter", but after finally finding the actual news story and READING it for the details (this is not the kind of thing that holds any interest at all for ye olde me), the last two words finally fell out.

      The six words strung all together still don't make much sense as a headline, as far as I can tell (i.e I'm not even sure what ORDER they are supposed to be in), but I know they are correct.

      Delete
  7. BTW I did get the business news anagram, and I know the musical group and the "BLACK" song, but not the European singer and the "COLD" song.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,
      The singer is Irish, first name associated with an Omen, surname is a global food staple. You can probably find this singer if you put “Cold _____ song” into your search engine of choice…
      Lego…BecauseThatIsExactlyWhatIDidToFindThisSingerInTheFirstPlace

      Delete
    2. And besides, it is not the SAME word for the song titles, that follows both BLACK and COLD (you accidentally typed GOLD in the puzzle itself, oh PuzzleAuthor....since this seems to be my day to nitpick, so very sorry)...therefore, once one has the BLACK song title, you have the COLD song title...or did I not assess that portion of the puzzle correctly? I know your hint matches my singer precisely (and indeed, only due to search engines.)

      Delete
    3. ViolinTeddy,
      That is not “Violinitpicking.” It is just more of your helpful ViolinTediting. Thank You. I fixed my “golden typo.” (Much better than a silver or bronze typo!)

      Your assessment is correct. Once one has the second word in the “Black _____” song, they also have the “Cold ____” song title, because the blanks bear the same word. (Or, once one has the second word in the “Cold _____” song, they also have the “Black ____” song title.)

      LegoWhenHeShovelsSnowIsA”ColdDigger”

      Delete
    4. Also, "all my intended answers are one syllable long" seems not to apply to #7.

      Delete
    5. You are correct, Paul. In HUM # 7, the second word in both song titles contains TWO syllables, not one as I stated. An oversight on my part. Okay, I goofed!

      LegoDishesOutTheSyllaBull

      Delete
  8. WEll, I think that at long last, I pieced together the PERSON who would make the derogatory comments...this again due ONLY to the hints re obscure color (that was a BEAST to find...I've never even heard of that word being a color!) and then getting lucky re the car model (I had no idea what it was), finally finding that last name connected to the story at hand, and his past negative comments.

    I still do NOT, however, have the four-word phrase. I may well just surrender at this point!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Neither do I, VT. We need more hints on that one, Lego! Do we even have the right words that begin with W and C? The country beginning with N was easy. There's not too many of them that fit that description. And I'm still struggling with the Midwestern sports story. More hints, please!

    ReplyDelete
  10. PJB, I realized that I would have been 'on' to the sports story way sooner IF I had paid attention to the actual headline that Lego wrote for it. (That's my hint.)

    The W and C words really ought to fall out for you once you have the movie title, that is, IF you heard the news story last week. [I happened to know what they were immediately, without searching.] And having those two words, a little Googling should yield for you the "N" country.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,

      We are aware that you are well aware of the N-country. ViolinTeddy gave some nice hints, though, just now. (Thanks, VT.)

      But here are a few more:

      BABA: In the puzzle title, the acronym-that-rhymes-with-God, DOD, is a hint…
      And,
      The nature photographer on assignment in New Zealand asked his assistant, “Is my wombat cam on?”

      The event the sports story covers happened on Thursday evening.

      Lego”NoWombatCam?ShootingAKoalaOrKangarooWillDidgeridoo”

      Delete
  11. VT, you misunderstand. I have the country with N, I'm just not sure about the other two words. The ones I think they are don't really give me anything anagram-wise. As far as anything in the news goes, I don't usually scan all the search engines looking for words that may be important for that week's Puzzleria!(although that may help, but it seems a little boring; I prefer looking stuff up after I've read the puzzles)Anything else is in the local paper here in Jasper, or mentioned on the late-night talk shows. We also may have the news on the TV, but I don't pay that much attention. So excuse me if some of these puzzles' answers don't come so easily for me right away. If it's a direct quote maybe, but it's a little harder if it's just a few associated words(like six words that are all mutually exclusive like in this sports story).

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,

      The six words in the sports story:
      3 first names
      2 surnames (which are the same surname)
      1 word sung in the presence of POTUS

      LegoWhoLivesInMinnesotaNowButWasBornAndRearedInTheLandOfFreeze&Cheese

      Delete
    2. Oops, pjb, I missed that you said you had figured out the "N" country already (although, without knowing what the whole story is, I don't quite know how you pinned it down.)

      Delete
  12. If those are the right words, I can't get a good anagram out of any of it. As for the sports story, I need a little more to go on than "happened Thursday night, in the paper Friday".

    ReplyDelete
  13. I should be glad I got just the one anagram of all three.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. pjb,

      In the BABA derisive phrase:
      The first word (3 letters) is a homophone of a Three Dog Night hit, and a palindrome of what the Packers did Thursday evening.
      The second word (1 letter), because you have no “I” in your Scrabble tray, can be only one thing, right?
      Remove the word “my” from a Farley flick to get the third word (6 letters).
      The fourth word (7 letters) rhymes with A Seinfeld catchphrase (really a “catchword”) or the surname of a president with no real middle name.

      LegoThisBABAPuzzleIsProvingToBeATeenageWasteland!

      Delete
    2. Alrighty, ONLY due to your extensive help above, LegoFactoryOfHints, I finally have assembled four words which COULD be the BABA phrase of negativity. (I'd thought I had the first word before, but it turns out to be wrong by one letter.) But for the 'new' choice to be correct, given the hint directly above, wouldn't you mean that THE correct first word is also a PALINDROME of the homophone of the Three Dog Night hit? (If not, I can't make it work out.)

      As for the still-nebulous fourth word, I came up with one, but really, I don't think it IS just one word, so perhaps I have the wrong thing (even though what I have makes good sense with the entire topic.)

      Delete
    3. Scratch my last paragraph, please...I managed to mix myself up! The seven-letter last word is very nicely ONE word, after all...sorry about that. I somehow had fouled up my remaining letters and gotten something totally different, till I double checked.

      Delete
    4. ViolinTeddy,
      Yes, You are again correct. THE correct first word is indeed also a PALINDROME of the homophone of the Three Dog Night hit.

      LegoIsTestInViolinTeddy'sEditingEnduranceThisWeek!

      Delete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Thanks for the help, Lego. I just got both anagrams. Now all I have left are the COLD and BLACK answers. I have the one with three answers, but I thought it might interest you to know I've found a fourth. Preceding COLD, it makes a two-word phrase for something you wouldn't want to have. Following BLACK, it makes a compound word for something else you wouldn't want to have, only not as bad as the first thing. Can you guess what my word is? You'll need to use your noggin to get it. Also, the one about "after COLD and after BLACK" has two answers I have found, but in my opinion,they are both for the birds(That's my clue!). One is two words for both, the other has a compound word and a hyphenated word. Consider them freebies. Tell ya Tuesday.(I also have an answer for the one "after COLD and before BLACK", but I may be reaching a bit for that one. Feel free to offer any hints on that one.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,
      You are welcome.

      I know what your BLACK ____ COLD answer is -- things you don't want to have. Good one (or, perhaps, bad one!).

      As for your two for-the-bird answers, the obvious one is my intended answer. The only other BLACK ___/COLD ___ bird answer I can think of has two syllables.

      As for the COLD ____ BLACK answer that you "may be reaching a bit for," I need a hint!

      LegoBirdBrain

      Delete
  16. You mean a little bulb hasn't appeared over your head? I can tell you neither of my bird answers have two syllables. Only one for each. As far as the "reaching" one goes, it's probably a little ironic, but you might want to consider a certain meaning for the word "shade".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There's a rock band from KC called Cold Crow.
      Cold Hue... Hu(go) Black?

      LegoSearchingForNeedlesButGraspingAtStrawsInpatjberry'sHaystack!

      Delete
  17. BTW I never actually got the name of the guy who supposedly made the disparaging remark. That picture of the auto doesn't help. Got anything else to help figure that one out?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The guy has a wonderful first name. The color of the auto is a homophone of a synonym of finished. The make of the car is not a Lincoln, but a "Leslie."

      LegoLincolnLoggoInAFoggo

      Delete
  18. HUM:
    1. black gold
    2. cold pack
    3. cold coffee
    black coffee
    4. I get/got cold
    I get/got black (chess game)
    go/went/gone cold (my luck went cold)
    go/went/gone black (the room/sky went black)
    blow cold
    blow black
    deep cold
    deep black
    5. black out
    out cold
    black head
    head cold
    ice cold
    black ice
    6. cold looks/jet (of water)
    looks/jet black (the future looks black)
    7. ??? I don't know pop-rock songs or groups. If you told me the answer, I wouldn't recognize it.

    BNS:
    CYBER MONDAY RECORD SALES

    POTS:
    CUE BALL>>>CUBE>>>DICE (DIE)

    BABA:
    RALEIGH cigarettes.
    RALEIGH bicycles.
    KENT cigarettes.
    KENT bicycles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ron,
      It's odd how many bicycle and cigarette brands have the same name. What's with that?

      LegoSmokesSchwinns

      Delete
  19. HUM
    1-gold
    2-pack
    3-feet, heart(ed)
    4-turn [I didn't notice it had started to turn cold until my frostbitten toes began to turn black.]
    5-ice, out, stone, head [pjb's answer; EXCELLENT!]
    6-jet [coldjet.com]
    7-water {Doobie Brothers & Damien Rice}

    BABA
    Gitane(s) [I really think the bicycle is without an 's' and the cigarette is with an 's', but I'm no Frenchman.]
    G.I. Jane
    women, combat
    Norway
    Now a tomboy crewman?!
    Dunford
    No way!

    BNS
    Cyber Monday Record Sales

    POTS
    cue ball (sphere) & die (cube) -- both typically used on horizontal green felt surface
    4913, 9, 9261, 125, 8, 1, 1728, as if it matters

    GSD
    Aaron Rodgers - Richard Rodgers Hail Mary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Uh ... three cubed is twenty-seven. I knew that. Honest.

      Delete
  20. Morsel:
    1. Black GOLD/MOLD
    2. Cold PACK
    3. Cold FISH/Blackfish; Cold Day/Black Day; Cold COFFEE/ Black COFFEE
    4. ?
    5. Black OUT/ OUT Cold; Black ICE/ ICE Cold
    6. Cold PITCH/ PITCH Black
    7. Black Water/Cold Water; The Doobie Brothers/Damien Rice (brothers, rice)

    Appetizer: GITANES = G.I. JANE; WOMEN and COMBAT; NORWAY ; DUNFORD is the negative person; NOW A TOMBOY CREWMAN; NO WAY!

    Business News Slice: CYBER MONDAY SALES RECORD

    Power of Three Slice: (Circular) CUE BALL -> CUBE (a DIE, as rolled on a felt gaming table with hard sides like a pool table has)

    Grand Slam Dessert: AARON RODGERS HAIL MARY RICHARD RODGERS

    ReplyDelete
  21. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 1:

    Morsel Menu

    Hooking Up Morsel:
    That cold black magic
    The day after Thanksgiving Day is known as both Black Friday and Cold Turkey Day. Solve the following posers involving “Cold” and “Black.” All my intended answers are one syllable long and involve “hooking up” other words with “cold” and/or “black.” These other words follow or precede cold or black to form two-word phrases or two-syllable compound words. One of my compound words is a proper noun.
    1. Name a word that follows black that rhymes with cold. (I have one answer.)
    2. Name a word that follows cold that rhymes with black. (I have one answer.)
    3. Name a word that follows cold and also follows black. (I have one answer.)
    4. Name a word that precedes cold and also precedes black. (I have no answer, no clue, nada.)
    5. Name a word that follows black but can also precede cold. (I have three answers.)
    6. Name a word that follows cold but can also precede black. (I have one answer.)
    7. Name a word that follows black or gold to form two song titles. The “Black _____” title was a big hit, released in the 20th century, for a mainstream pop-rock group. The “Cold _____” title was a “deep cut” on an album by a European singer-songwriter’s debut album, released in the 21st century. (I have one title for each song.)
    Hint: The first name of the group and the first name of the singer begin with the same letter. The second word in the group’s name and the surname of the singer could both be lower-cased and used as common nouns.

    Answers:
    1. Black gold
    2. Cold pack
    3. Cold Duck; Black duck
    4. { }
    5. Black ice, ice cold; blackout, out cold; Blackstone, stone cold
    6. Cold boot, bootblack
    7. Black Water, Cold Water

    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  22. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 2:
    Appetizer Menu

    Bikes And Butts Appetizer:
    “What hath DOD wrought”
    Name a brand name of cigarettes that is also a brand name of bicycles. Place punctuation marks after the first two letters, capitalize the second letter, and change the third letter to a letter eight times more valuable in the game of Scrabble. Leave a space between the second and third letters to form a movie title (from a decade that is an acronym of an anagram of “Einstein”) which has come to be used sometimes as a slang term for the subject of a national policy story appearing this past week in the news.
    Name two other words that comprise the gist of the story, beginning with a W and a C. Name the country, beginning with an N, where essentially this same story was written in newspapers 30 years ago. Rearrange the letters in these two words and country to form a four-word derisive phrase that someone who disagrees with the policy might use to describe an example of what the policy, when enacted, may well shall hath wrought.
    What is the movie title/slang term? What are the three words and the four-word phrase that they form?
    Hint: The two-syllable surname of a person who might privately utter the “four-word derisive phrase,” if divided into two words, would be an accurate adjective-noun caption for the automobile pictured here. (The adjective describes the color of the auto, a three-letter word.) The four-word derisive phrase might look something like this:
    “__ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __ __!?”
    Hint: The person who might utter the four-word derisive phrase may also utter a two-word defiant phrase that can be formed by removing a letter from the interior of the country that begins with an N, leaving the space where it is, and tacking an exclamation mark onto the end.

    Answer:
    G.I. Jane”; Gitane >> G.I. Jane
    Women, Combat, Norway
    “Now a tomboy crewman?!”
    Hints: Marine Commandant Gen. Joe Dunford, now Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, might have also remarked, “No way!” (NORWAY – R = NO WAY)


    MENU

    Business News Slice:
    We’ve been countin’ beans
    “Scorers cry, ‘Addable money!’”
    Rearrange the letters the statement above to form four words (two pairs of words) that appeared on the business sections of newspapers this past week.
    What are these four words?

    Answer: Cyber Monday Record Sales

    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  23. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 3:

    Power Of Three Slice:
    Getting into game shape
    Name a piece of equipment used in a game, in two words. Apply to the end of the first word the consonant sound that begins the second word. The first word now sounds like the shape, not of the second word but, of another piece of gaming equipment that makes contact with a surface similar – in color and texture – to the surface with which the original piece of gaming equipment comes into contact.
    What are these two pieces of gaming equipment, and their shapes?
    Hint: Compute (raise) each of the following numbers to its third power:
    17, 3, 21, 5, 2, 1, 12

    Answer: Cue ball, die
    Cue + b = Cueb >> Cube = the shape of a die, which is rolled often across a green-felted craps table. A cue ball rolls across a green-felted billiards or pool table.
    Hint: Raising each of the seven numbers to the third power means to “cube all” >> cue ball.
    The seven numbers listed are the alphabetical rankings of Q, CUE and BAL, 17, 3-21-5 and 2-1-12.

    Dessert Menu
    Grand Slam Dessert:
    Homer’s odyssey to the state of Troy
    “Grid yards, arm, racer do gore Lions… Rah Rah!”
    The above headline may have appeared in “homer” newspapers’ sports pages originating in the upper Midwest this past week. Rearrange the letters to form six words that would have appeared in the news story beneath the homer headline.
    The six words consist of five proper nouns and a verb. What are they?

    Answer: Aaron Rodgers, Richard Rodgers, Hail Mary
    “Grid yards, arm, racer do gore Lions… Rah Rah!”
    Grid(iron) yards” = The Green Bay Packers advanced 61 yards for a game-winning touchdown vs. the Detroit Lions.
    “Arm” = …of Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers who slung the ball 65+ yards in the air.
    “Racer” = Richard Rodgers, Packer receiver who raced 60+ yards into the end zone where he snagged his QB’s heave.
    “Do gore Lions” = final score: Packers 27, Lions 23
    “Rah Rah!” Homer Packer fans cheer

    Lego…

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  24. It seems we all had different ideas for #6 of the cold/black Morsel, in particular...I like 'jet' that both Ron and Paul came up with, but I have no idea what your 'Cold Boot" is, Lego.

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    1. ViolinTeddy,

      cold boot. Gotta love computer jargon.

      LegoUpHereInPaulBunyan/FrozenTundraCountryWeOftenWearColdBoots(WhichAggravateOurBunions)!

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  25. We also have various answers for Morsel #3: DUCK, FISH (and DAY) as well as HEART and FEET. My "Blackfish" choice was the title of the CNN special about orcas in captivity.

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  26. I never did get Dunford. I saw the Pontiac sign in the photo and never made the connection with Ford. And Ford is such a common ending for names. For some reason I thought it was a three-letter car name. The color was easy.
    My COLD and BLACK words: Blackhead and head cold, blackcock and cold-clock, black duck and cold duck, and cold light and light black
    "Shade" usually prevents light; Here it means a particular "shade" of black. I said I was reaching a bit on that one. Black is usually just black, right?
    Here's what else I got:
    Black gold
    Cold pack
    Blackout, out cold
    Black ice, ice cold
    Blackstone, stone cold
    Thanks to Paul for liking blackhead and head cold. They just came to me.
    "Black Water" by the Doobie Brothers, 1974;"Cold Water" by Damien Rice(I hear the former a lot, don't know the latter.)
    Gitane, G.I.Jane
    Now a tomboy crewman!?(Norway, women, combat)
    No way!
    Cyber Monday record sales
    Cueball(cube all, die)
    Aaron Rodgers, Richard Rodgers, "Hail Mary"
    Great puzzles, Lego! See you next week!


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    Replies
    1. My favorite, as well, of all your cold/black entires, pjb, is the blackhead/head cold one. Amazing none of the rest of us thought of that one! Those must have been the things that nobody wants, right?

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    2. Yes, VT, although if you had to choose you'd probably rather have the blackhead, right?

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    3. I guess you didn't see my post above: blackhead, head cold, second post of HUM #5.

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    4. Oh, sorry, Ron, no I missed that you had blackhead/ head cold in your list. [We all list in such different fashions, that it can be rather difficult to compare, especially with this Morsel that had SO many parts to it.] I HAD noticed that PAUL had indicated it was pjb's answer, though pjb hadn't posted his answers yet, so I was confused as to how he knew that. [Unless he just deduced it from pjb's hints.]

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  27. Stupid autocorrect! I meant cold-cock, not clock!

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  28. Sorry guys, apparently there's been some confusion here. I myself noticed only Paul mentioned my idea of blackhead/head cold, and was especially flattered by his calling it "excellent". I should have known there would be a number of bloggers getting that one. Good job solving it everyone! Again, sorry Ron if I didn't see you had mentioned it first.

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