Friday, August 27, 2021

We 1, 8... go 4th 2 stop 4 a 2nd; Duds that sports fans sport; Crooners and other tune-carriers; Nerds noshin’ on hors d’oeuvres; Buck, barking Breeze & mall munchkins

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Buck, barking Breeze & mall munchkins 

The following three clues hint at a period of time. What is it?

🕮Clue #1. Find the final two words in the three-word title of a non-fiction book (and its film adaptation) that begins with a non-prime integer that represents a collective number of people, some of whom are named: “Chick,” “Happy,” “Swede,” “Buck,” “Lefty” and “Eddie” (and, no, they were not dwarfs!*)

“(The non-prime integer) ___ ___”

* (although there was indeed a dwarf named Eddie who who actually made a plate appearance in the major leagues – an at-bat likey inspired by James Thurber)

🏈Clue #2. Give the first name of Mr. “Breeze,” and a word he may have barked while in a shotgun formation or under center during the long course of his recently completed career: 

____, and “___!”

👪Clue #3. Name a phrase for what childen shopping in a mall with their parents might call an escalator: 

“___ ______”

What is this period of time?

Hints: In each of the the three clues, the words in the two blanks must be anagrammed to form at least two abbreviations. A total of 22 letters belong in the six blanks.

Appetizer Menu

Delightfully Puzzley Appetizer:

Crooners and other tune-carriers

A singer with links to hardball

⚾1. Think of a famous past female rhythm-and-blues singer and songwriter. She had a three-part name, and also a three-part stage name. 

Her stage-name initials are the same as an important medical procedure developed in the
1960s.

Her first and middle names, at birth, (if you add a “z”-sound to the end of the middle name) sound like the name of a Hall of Fame baseball player who was her contemporary. 

Finally, She has a connection to “the King.” 

Who is this singer? 

What medical procedure do her initials stand for?

What Hall of Fame baseball player was her contemporary? 

What is her connection to “the King?”

Brown-eyed girl, blue-eyed guy

🖃👀2. Name a famous singer. 

Mix up his last name to get a word you might use in reference to a skilled jewelry maker or other craftsperson.

His first name is also a lowercase word
associated with sincerity, postage and ballparks.

Who is this singer?

What is the word you might use in reference to a skilled jewelry maker or other craftsperson?

Goal-den-throated” diva

💰3. Take a famous singer, first and last names, ten letters total. 
Replace the first two letters of the last name with a “t”. 

Anagram the nine letters of this result to get a word that applies to people with a goal – like, for example, winning a Cy Young Award, getting a law degree or donating time or money to a worthy cause.

Who is this singer? What word applies to people with a goal?

MENU

Unswingin’ Slice:

Nerds noshin on hors d’oeuvres

Name a two-word part of an hors d’oeuvre, in one and nine letters. Rearrange these letters to spell a three-word phrase meaning “didn’t swing.” 

The part of the hors d’oeuvre consists of an article and noun. The three-word phrase meaning “didn’t swing” consists of a verb,
article and noun.

What are this part of a hors d’oeuvre and three-word phrase?

Hint: The part of the hors d’oeuvre, which is not meant to be ingested, somewhat resembles a miniature version of what a person who “didn’t swing” would have swung with.

Riffing Off Shortz And Austin Slices:

We 1, 8... go 4th 2 stop 4 a 2nd 

Will Shortz’s August 22nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Ben Austin of Dobbs Ferry, New York, reads:

Take the name of a major American city. 
Move one of its letters three spaces later in the alphabet. 
Embedded in the resulting string of letters, reading left to right, is a cardinal number. 
Remove that number, and the remaining letters, reading left to right, spell an ordinal number. 
What city is it, and what are the numbers? 

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Austin Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Take the first and last names of a puzzle-maker. Move one of its letters eleven spaces later in the alphabet. 


The first, second, fourth, fifth, seventh and third letters spell a word that a poet, in an ode, equated with “truth.” 

The remaining letters, reading left to right, spell the synonym of a word that is contrasted with “truth” in the King James Version of one of St. Paul’s epistles to the Corinthians.

Who is this puzzle-maker?

What word did the odist equate with “truth”?

What is the synonym of the word St. Paul contrasted with “truth” in the KJV?

Note: Entree #2 is the brainchild of our friend GB, whose “GB’s Bafflers” puzzle-package is featured regularly on Puzzleria! Thanks, GB!

ENTREE #2

Take the name of a state capital city. Remove the second letter. Move the first letter four places back in the alphabet (e.g., Z would become V).  

The remaining letters reading left to right, in order, form two words which figure centrally in a well-known 1960s adventure film. What are the city, the two words, and the film?

Hint: The culminating action of that film is set in the state of which the city is the capital.  

ENTREE #3  

Take the name of a major American city. Embedded within it, reading left to right, is the abbreviated form of a U.S. Cabinet position. 

Remove that abbreviation, and the remaining

letters, reading left to right, spell the first word in the title of a 1970s sitcom. 

The fourth word in the title describes 83 of the 85 people who have held that U.S. Cabinet position.  

What city is it?

What is the Cabinet position?

What is the sitcom title?

ENTREE #4

Take the name of a major American city. Embedded in the middle is a string of letters that can be anagrammed to form the color of a furry monster with a falsetto voice and illeism.

Remove that string of letters, and the remaining letters, reading left to right, spell the surname of the creator of this monster.

What city is it?

What color is the monster, and who created it?

ENTREE #5

Take the name of a major American city. 

Embedded in the name are five letters that can be anagrammed to spell a two-word phrase for what golfers do after leaving a putt an inch short.

Remove those letters, and the remaining letters, reading left to right, spell the original name of the person who is the eponym of the city. 

What city is this?

What do golfers do after leaving a putt an inch short?

What is the original name of the person who is the eponym of the city?

ENTREE #6

Take the name of a major American city. Move one of its letters eight spaces later in the alphabet (e.g., B would become J). 

Embedded in the resulting string of letters, reading left to right, is a synonym of “loo”. 

Remove that synonym, and the remaining letters can be anagrammed to spell either
something unpleasant within a loo or something you might open to mitigate that unpleasantness. 

What city is it?

What is the synonym of “loo”?

What is unpleasant within a loo, and what might you open to mitigate that unpleasantness?

ENTREE #7

Take the name of a major American city. 

Remove three consecutive interior letters. Spell them backward to name a French word for a large body of water. 

The remaining letters, reading left to right, spell an English word for where you might see a much smaller body of water. 

What city is it?

ENTREE #8

Each of the two images, #1 and #2, in the accompanying composite picture is lacking a caption. You must supply both captions.

Image #1 is trivial. Just transcribe the two words spelled out in neon.

Image #2, also a two-word caption, is just a tad more tricky. It contains words of six and four letters.

Anagram the combined letters of each caption to name two major American cities.

But wait! Although the caption in Image #1 may be trivial, forming the city from that caption is not so trivial. Before you anagram the combined letters of the caption “Neon weasel” you must first replace one of its letters – one that appears more than once (that is, either an “n” or an “e”) – with a letter that appears just once in the Image #2 caption.

What are these cities?

Dessert Menu 

Grandstand Garb  Dessert:

Duds that sports fans sport

Name a position of a player in a team sport. 

Divide it in two to name two articles of clothing that a spectator of the sport might sport. 

What is this position of a player in a team sport?

What are the two articles of clothing?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup,
Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, August 20, 2021

Oman is no island, but No man is... Above the belt? Below the belt? Say it with a song and a spray; Winged and wingless things; Pledge, prime mover, Polynesia, postwomen, plus...

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Say it with a song and a spray 

Name a flower one may give to to another to express loving emotions. 

A number of consecutive letters in the flower, in order, spell a type of song to which people may have an emotional attachment. 

The remaining letters can be rearranged to spell, in two words, what one may call his or her beloved. 

What flower is this?

What is the type of song to which people may have an emotional attachment?

What may one call his or her beloved?

Appetizer Menu

Worldplayful Appetizer:

Pledge, prime mover, Polynesia, postwomen, plus...

The demonymic Euro-Auto shop Service Pledge

1. ðŸš—🚘We ____ all your Euro-auto needs. Each mechanic’ ____ his/her work. We never ____ to ____to a job, ____ every bolt to factory ____ equivalent spec, and ____ all our work. We ____  joints, put ____ your tires, and ____ your ____ other fluids. We always wax and ____ your ____ to a glossy ____. We even use a patented ____ technique to clean the interior gently! Even _____ pleased with our work! You can say ____; ____ you not. While waiting, have a ____ on us if you are ____ and refer us to your ____!

Note: Each blank is a demonym (or its adjectival form) of a country partially or wholly in Europe, or an autonomous province or territory within Europe. With one exception (used twice), each term appears exactly once (demonyms and adjectival forms are taken as separate, if different). Two countries’ names are used in place of their respective demonyms. Some of the blanks are “groaners” (non-exact puns). 

A Polynesian puzzle

2. ðŸA certain American product has become a staple food in the islands of Polynesia and Micronesia in the Pacific, as a result of its introduction to those regions during World War II. Spell the name of this product backwards to give another place where you may see these same islands.

Postwomen

3. ðŸ“­Think of a rather common, historic female name. It consists of the postal abbreviation for a US state, followed by an
article and the postal abbreviations for two other US states. What is the female name?

Prime Mover

4. ðŸ¹Name a prime mover of the 19th century. Drop its first and last letters. Split the result into three words: who most likely operated it, and two beverages they might have consumed: one alcoholic, and one not. What is the prime mover? Who operated it, and what did they drink?

Rx for golfers  

5. ðŸ’ŠðŸŒTake the European name for a familiar medication. Split to obtain two golf scores, an alternate version of a musical note, and an
abbreviation for a fundamental unit in chemistry. What is the medication?

Long, medium, short 

6.👪 Think of a familiar noun in 13 letters. The first two letters are frequently used to denote the same item. The first six letters are also used to denote this same item in certain settings. What are this word and its two shortened synonyms?

MENU

Anatomic Bombast Slice:

Above the belt? Below the belt?

Name two body parts, one above the belt and one below the belt. 

Rearrange the letters of the lower part. 

Double a letter in the upper part and rearrange. 

You’ll get a pair of synonyms meaning “to cry out.” 

What are these body parts and synonyms?

Hint: An anagram of one body part appears in the puzzle’s text.

Riffing Off Blaine Slices:

Oman is no island, but No man is... 

Blaine’s August 8th puzzle, posted on his puzzle blog in lieu of an NPR puzzle being broadcast, reads:

Take the name of an island. Shift the first letter two later in the alphabet (e.g. A would become C). Read the result backwards and you’ll have the name of another island. What are the two islands?

Note: Two of Puzzleria!s finest puzzle-makers have contributed riff-offs of Blaine’s puzzle: Entree #1 was created by geofan (whose Worldplay feature is this week’s Appetizer). And Entree #2 was created by Plantsmith (whose Garden of Puzzley Delights feature will be Puzzleria!s August 27th Appetizer). 

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Blaine Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Name a country. Move the first letter two places later in the alphabet (e.g. A would become C). The result, read backwards, is a notable geographic point in another country. 

What are the country and notable point?

ENTREE #2

Name an island. Change the second letter to the letter that is 14 places “downstream in the alphabetic flow” (e.g. A would become O). 

Then move this new letter to end of the name to get the name of a second island.

The first island is a territory of a bean-shaped nation. The second island is itself bean-shaped.

What are these two islands?

Hint: Reverse the second and third letters in the second island, add an “s” to the beginning and spell the result backward to get the name of a subject of several Ancient Greek plays and myths. 

ENTREE #3

Take the possessive form of the one-word name of a maker of a recent puzzle about a pair of islands. After it, write a four-letter service he provides weekly. The result is an alliterative two-word term.

Rearrange the 11 letters in this term to form a
two-word term that describes the following phrase:

“Fight Truth-decay; brush up on your Good Book.”

What are these two two-word terms? 

ENTREE #4

Take the name of an island that is also the name of a beverage. Shift the first letter two later in the alphabet (e.g. A would become C). 

Read the result forwards and you’ll have the
name of a substance that many islands, including Hawaii and the Galapagos, are formed from. 

What are this island and this substance?

ENTREE #5

Take the name of a landlocked country. 

Shift the first letter two earlier in the alphabet (e.g. C would become A). 

Read the result backwards and you’ll have the
name of a kind of pin. 

What is the landlocked nation? 

What is the kind of pin?

ENTREE #6

Take the third word in the name of a promontoryChange its penultimate letter to a different vowel. 

Rearrange these nine letters to spell an informal two-word term that describes Queen Elizabeth or Prince William or Prince Charles.

What is the promontory?

What is the two-word term?

ENTREE #7

Take the name of an Asian island with a population of almost two million, an island that may not exist in the future; large parts of this island, with a peak elevation of only six feet, have already been inundated by a rise in sea level. 

Shift the first letter one place earlier in the alphabet (e.g. B would become A). 

Read the result backwards and you’ll have a word associated with a United States island. 

This word is a contronym (like “sanction” or “overlook”). 

What are this vanishing island and this contronym?

ENTREE #8

Take the name of a bean-shaped island in eastern Canada. 

Remove the first letter and read the result backwards and you’ll have the name of another island – one associated with a famous person from history and a famous palindrome. 

What are the two islands?


Dessert Menu 

Spoonerific Dessert:

Winged and wingless things

Name a wingless creature in two syllables. 

Spoonerize the two syllables – that is, switch
their beginning sounds – to name two winged creatures. 

What are these three creatures?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes,
“hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, August 13, 2021

Basic math leads to higher math; New horizons, ancient “verticons” Forming fibbery from formality; Songbirds & bees, breeze & trees; Good guys, bad guys... Take your best shot at the disTV Guise from the Golden Age

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Songbirds & bees, breeze & trees 

Contemplate these three breezy words:
What the breeze did, what the willow trees thus did, and what the breeze often does to
flies and bees. 

These three words sound like a song title. 

What title is it?

Appetizer Menu

MisTVGuided Appetizer:

Good guys, bad guys... Take your best shot at the disTV Guise from the Golden Age 

TV GUISE

We published the first edition of TV GUISE on Puzzleria! this past March.  

Now, courtesy of Ecoarchitect, we are proud (or something like that) to deliver to you the second edition. 

All 13 of these show titles are
from the Golden Age of television – the 1950s and 1960s, or thenabouts.

Here is how TV GUISE came about:

Through an unfortunate miscommunication in outsourcing, the titles of a series of television programs accidentally had one (and only one) letter changed. 

Due to imperfect artificial intelligence, the guide automatically generated descriptions of the shows that are just not quite right.  

Below are thirteen generated descriptions, sometimes with an (artificial) acclamation. 

Can you name the mistaken and the original titles of these shows?  

Note that while only one letter is changed, occasionally punctuation, capitalization and spacing between letters are changed to create new words.

Here is an example in which all that changes is just one letter:

A wise and mild-mannered patriarch strings his family along.  

“A prelude to Family Ties?”  

Answer: Father Knots Best (Father Knows Best).

And now, here are the “misGUIDEd” shows in Ecoarchitect’s latest edition: 

 An upbeat criminal attorney switches his life orientation, becoming a bricklayer.  “Will he pursue a wife on Easy Street?”

 Police web in LA looks to remove cross
dressers.  “TGIF!”

Retrospective of Rod Serling time-jumping between episodes.  “Unmasked!”

 There’s no accounting for the G-Men chasing bootleggers.  “This stacks up really well!”

An enthusiastic look at the weapons culture of the Old West, with a call for additional arms.  “You can’t dodge this show!”

 Convenience store factors in smaller group’s trip on Los Angeles Boulevard.  “Pretty Kookie!”

There are 8 million stores and they all sell overpriced shoes.  “Just Watch It!”

 20 years ahead of his time, a charming desperado and his sidekick find action
throughout nightclubs in the west.  “You’ll say ‘Let’s Went’ for every episode!”

Shown opposite “Leave It To Be A Her,” there is definite conflict regarding the gender of the title character and the adventures of his/her family.  “Well, this show will never fall down!”

With an alternate ending, Blaine, an expatriate living in the West, marries his former love.  “Never gonna give this up!”

Fan favorite show about a girl falling in love with a man six times her age. “This show is great even though the main character sucks!” 

An Egyptian God decides, ironically, to become a Caucasian in the Old West.  “A Rowdy Show!”

A special tribute to a fictional Joseph Young, whose repeated blog puzzles provide a good example for all, especially his son.  And he gives many a second chance.  “Don’t chuck this out or you might be short-shrifted!”

MENU

Arithmetix Mix-Up Slice:

Basic math leads to higher math

Take something arithmetic students learn, in two words.

Rearrange the letters to spell a calculus term, a
quantum mechanics term, and a two-word economics term pertaining to budgets. 

What are these six words?

Riffing Off Shortz And Pegg Slices:

New horizons, ancient “verticons”

Will Shortz’s August 1st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Ed Pegg Jr., reads:

Think of something that gets people moving vertically. Remove the middle two letters, and you get something that moves people horizontally. What two things are these?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Pegg Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Think of something that gets people moving vertically, in four letters.

Think of something that gets people up and moving about vigorously, in three letters.

Think of a form of lyric poetry, in five letters, that can be very moving – as written by Horace and Pindar, for example.

Rearrange these 12 letters in these three words to spell the name of a puzzle-maker.

Who is the puzzle-maker?

What gets people moving vertically?

What gets people up and moving about vigorously?

What is the moving form of lyric poetry?

Hint: The puzzle-maker’s name includes an abbreviation. In your answer you must spell it out. 

ENTREE #2

Think of things that get people moving vertically. 

Remove three interior letters, and you get
things that cause other things to move in circular paths. 

What three things are these?

ENTREE #3

Think of things that get people moving vertically downward, figuratively. 

Remove three consecutive interior letters, and you shall get things that will move people vertically downward, mephist.... metaphorically. 

What two things are these?

ENTREE #4

Think a verb that means to lift people vertically. 

Remove two consecutive letters near the
middle and you get a verb that means to lift people’s spirits. 

What two verbs are these?

ENTREE #5

Think of something that moves diagonally. 

Move the middle two letters to the end. Invert the new last letter. 

The result is a diagnostic medical procedure.

What moves diagonally?

What is the diagnostic medical procedure?

ENTREE #6

Think of things, in two words, that get people to move an implement vertically, but not upward. 

Spoonerize the two words – that is, switch their initial consonant sounds. 

The result is something certain circus performers pay to the American Guild of Variety Artists (AGVA), an AFL-CIO-affiliated labor union. 

What things get people to move an implement vertically?

What do certain circus performers pay to the AGVA?

ENTREE #7

Think of things, in two words, that get people moving an implement horizontally, but not leftward. 

Rearrange the letters, and you get a two-word term describing or indicating a college student’s high achievent on an exam that requires no implement – such as, say, a pen or word processor. 

What things get people moving an implement horizontally?

What term describes or indicates high achievent on an exam that requires no implement.

ENTREE #8

Think of something that moves both vertically and horizontally. 

Remove the middle two letters. The result will be the first name of someone who spent much of his life going around in circles. 

What moves vertically and horizontally?

Who spent much of his life going around in circles.

Dessert Menu 

Deceitful Dessert:

Forming fibbery from formality

Name some formal attire, in four words. Replace one word with a homophone and change a letter in another word. 

The result is a fib and some falsehoods. 

What is this formal attire?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.