Friday, May 7, 2021

Yummy Mother’s Day 'Menumami' Singin’ the red, white and blues; Trente-deux hachoirs à mâcher; Nissans or Novas vrooming past! “A reading from the Book of Genevasis”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Nissans or Novas vrooming past!

An accelerating Nissan or Nova vroomed past us alarmingly. Indeed!

Two of those ten words above ought to begin with a different letter. 

What words are they? 

What letters should they begin with?

Hint: Take the two words that ought to begin with a different letter. 

Put each of the two “different letters” at the beginning of each word and place these two results next to each other to form a word that persons kneeling at a rail once heard (and occasionally still do) while sticking out their tongues.

Econfusing Rebushwacky Appetizer:

Yummy Mother’s Day “Menumami”

M is for the Many things she gave us,

O means only that she’s growing Old.

T is for the Tears she shed to save us,

H is for her Heart of purest gold.

E is for kind Eyes that watch and keep us...

R is for a brain-wave-bending Rebus!

Yes, it’s a third helping of holiday “cerebral rebusity” designed and served up by our friend “EcoarCHEFtect” (aka Ecoarchitect).

And, this time, the menu is all Mom’s.

You may recall that last November 13 Eco
elected to inaugurate his rebus-puzzle campaign with “E Plu Rebus Unum,” a slate of 26 rebus puzzles with presidents... but without precedent on Puzzleria!

Then, on Christmas Eve, Eco presented us with a bagful of 43 Holiday Repast Rebuses.

Which brings us to this week’s gustatory “Rebustatory” Mother’s Day Delights...

Enjoy!





MENU

The Alpha(betical) And The Omega Slice:

“A reading from the Book of Genevasis”*

Name two world capitals, in alphabetical order.

Make anagrams of each — which will also be in alphabetical order.

These anagrams form a phrase that would
make a fitting caption for a memorable scene from the Book of Genesis. 

What are these capitals?

What is the caption?

* Granted, Geneva may not be the capital of Switzerland but it is the capital of the Republic and Canton of Geneva.

Riffing Off Shortz And Kalish Slices:

Singin’ the red, white and blues

Will Shortz’s May 2nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Evan Kalish of Bayside, New York, reads:

Name a famous blues singer — first and last name as this person is generally known.
Change the first letter to a “B”, and phonetically you’ll get a nationality. Who’s the singer, and what’s the nationality?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Kalish Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Name a puzzle-maker — first and last names. 

Remove the first letter of the last name to form an adjective that means “resembling or characteristic of a beer that is brewed by fast fermentation with a quick-acting yeast.” 

Insert a hyphen someplace in this adjective and change the last letter to a “t” to form a noun for a group of people who perform tasks (like constructing puzzles) at the highest level of excellence (like this puzzle-maker).

Spell the puzzle-maker’s first name backward to form an area of a building that usually reaches high “skywardly.”  

Who’s the puzzle-maker?

ENTREE #2

Name a famous professional basketball player — first and last name as he is generally known. 

He died recently and was thus in the news. But a just fortnight later, his surname was again in the news — the collegiate basketball news.  

Move the first letter of his surname to the beginning of his first name and phonetically you’ll get two words:

1. a nationality, and

2. a five-letter synonym of “patient” that appears in no dictionaries (and is not even allowed in Scrabble!).

Who’s the cager?

What are the the nationality and the verboten-in-Scrabble “word”?

ENTREE #3

Take the first names of two title characters — a female from the pen of a female and a male from the pen of a male — from  novels published within a span of 20 years. 

Put the names side-by-side and phonetically you’ll get a member of a fictional race of humanoid extraterrestrials familiar to Trekkies. 

(But if you remove one syllable from the adjacent names you’ll get the demonym of a sovereign landlocked microstate on the Iberian Peninsula.) 

Who are the two characters?

What is the member of fictional race? 

What’s the demonym of the microstate?

ENTREE #4

Name a famous past blues singer, band leader and “harpoon” player — first and last name as this person is generally known. Divide the surname, a compound word, into two words. 

Switch the initial letters of the first name and first part of the surname. 

The result, phonetically, sounds like two pieces of sports equipment that make contact with each other. The second part of the surname is the setting for many other sports. 

Who’s the blues singer/“harpoon” player?

What are the  two pieces of sports equipment and the setting for many other sports

ENTREE #5

Name a very large number — one that is perhaps larger than googol, or even googolplex! 

Change the first letter to a two-consonant blend that begins with the letter five places earlier in the alphabet. 

The result, phonetically will be a nationality. 

What’s the large number?

What’s the nationality?

ENTREE #6

Descibe, in one noun, a coarse, gross, pretentious and earthy person who is lacking in cultivation, perception, or taste; who is morally crude, undeveloped, or unregenerate; who is ostentatious or excessive in expenditure or display; who is lewdly or profanely indecent and who spouts offensive language.

Change its first letter (which appears in the second half of the alphabet) to a letter that rhymes with it (which appears in the first half of the alphabet) to spell a nationality.

What’s the noun? 

What’s the nationality?

ENTREE #7

Take the four-syllable first name of a fictional character created by a British author. 

Move the letter that sits (fittingly) on the right end of the name to its left end. 

Change this letter to a letter that is more befitting of one occupying a spot on the left end of the word, as opposed to the right end.

The result, phonetically, sounds like a three-syllable nationality. 

Who’s the fictional character?

What’s the nationality?

Dessert Menu

Français Dessert:

Trente-deux hachoirs à mâcher

Take a French word for something you chew. 

Invert one letter and add a letter to the end. 

The result is an English word for something that helps you to chew. 

What are these two words?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, April 30, 2021

Net, reef, neigh, net, event... next? A trio of singular conundrums; “What we saw on our safari” Cnsnntsooa frsti, vwlsoe lsta; “Calling Mr. ... Calling Dr. Spock!”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED


Schpuzzle of the Week:

“What we saw on our safari”

Take a word for something you might take on an African safari. 

Change one vowel to a different vowel and
rearrange the result to spell two creatures you might very well see on the safari. 

What are these creatures?


Appetizer Menu

nOt easilY beAtEn conUndrums appetIzer:

A trio of singular conundrums

🥁1. Think of a non-plural six letter word with only one vowel, O (where Y counts as a
vowel). 

Change the O to a U to get another word.

🥁2.Think of a non-plural six letter word with only one vowel, O (where Y counts as a vowel). 

Change the O to a double E to get another word.

🥁3. Think of a non-plural six letter word with only one vowel, O (where Y counts as a vowel). 

Change the O to an I to get another word.


MENU

Sequential Slice:

Net, reef, neigh, net, event... next?

What is the sixth word in the following sequence?

Net, reef, neigh, net, event, ___?

Hint: The word  contains three letters.


Riffing Off Shortz And Gordon Slices:

Cnsnntsooa frsti, vwlsoe lsta

Will Shortz’s April 25th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Peter Gordon of Great Neck, New York, reads:

Think of a person in the news (5,4). The first name and last name each have at least two consonants and two vowels. All the consonants in each name come at the start, and all the vowels come at the end. The letter “y” is not used. Who is this famous person?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Gordon Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Think of the name of a puzzle-maker in the recent National Public Radio news, five letters in the first name, six letters in the surname. 

Rearrange the combined letters to spell a two-word caption, in five and six letters, for the
image pictured here. 

The six-letter word is a compound word that is also a grass genus.

Who is this puzzle-maker?

What is the caption?

ENTREE #2

Think of the first names of a trio of fictional brothers who are the grand-nephews of Scrooge. 

There are 14 total letters in the names. 

Four are consonants, three of which are the initials of the names. 

The other 10 letters are vowels, two of which are the letter “y”.

Who are these brothers?

ENTREE #3

Think of a noun that ends in four vowels. 

The eight letters preceding those four vowels alternate vowels and consonants.

Take letters numbered:

4, 3 &1;

8, 7 & 8;

6, 5 & 8;

4, 3, 5 & 2

6, 7, 3 & 6; and

8, 10, 10 & 8.

The six words formed by those strings of letters are all examples of the noun.

What is the noun?

What are the six words?

ENTREE #4

Think of a seven-letter past-tense verb that is an alternative spelling of a word that is an example of the noun that is the answer to Entree #3, above. 

The verb consists of the five different vowels (not including “y”) which are flanked by a two-letter term for an employee of a hospital. 

What is this verb?

ENTREE #5

Take a two-word name of the early wormlike stage of pesky pests that may infest your pets. 

You may spot them on “Spot,” your puppy, or witness them on “Kittenness,” your kitten. They resemble c-shaped flecks.

The name of these early-stage pests contains four and six letters. 

Both words end with the same two vowels, but in the reverse order of one another. 

What are these early-stage pests?  

ENTREE #6

Think of a country an its capital city. Both end with two vowels. 

Remove those four vowels. 

Remove also one of the two letters that appear twice in the remaining five letters. 

With the four letters that remain you can spell the contents of a world atlas. 

What are this country an its capital city?

What are the contents of a world atlas?

ENTREE #7

“1988 Masters Tournament champion Sandy Lyle, a Scotsman known for his ability to read the greens, kept his caddy in clover and his orange _____ ___ in a caddy.” 

The missing words in that sentence each end with two vowels. 

Remove those four ending vowels. The remaining letters can be rearranged to spell a third word that appears in the sentence.

What are the two missing words?

What is the third word from the sentence?

ENTREE #8

Otto, an amateur spelunker spends his day-off seeking the wonder of nature’s sculptures – stalactites and stalagmites. 

As he roams deeper down into the darkness he senses a dribbling in his wake. 

Otto aims his headlamp downward and sees a trickling of shallow rainwater tickling the sides of his sneakers’ soles. 

He thinks to himself, “Otto got to get outta here!” So he attempts to retrace his steps, but takes a wrong turn along the route. He calls out, “Help Otto get outta here! 

Eventually, as the seeping water steepens to a near knee-deep flow, he sees a headlamp light at the end of the tunnel. It’s attached to a rescuer named Anna who takes his hand and navigates with him against the teeming stream until, finally, the dark of dank night is washed away by the light of bright day.

Name what Otto has now become, a seven-letter word ending in three vowels.

Remove those three vowels and spell the remaining letters backward to name the “heart of darkness” from which Otto was rescued.

What has Otto become? What is this “heart of darkness.”

Dessert Menu

Rearing And Rearranging Dessert:

“Calling Mr. ... Calling Dr. Spock!”

Take a one-word synonym of “child rearing.”

Its last two syllables rhyme with one another. 

Its first four letters can be rearranged to name what parents often do for children in the early stages of rearing. 

What is this synonym?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, April 23, 2021

Take me to the Nicknameolodeon! Barnyard creatures barnstorming; A “cinenym” of an antonym of “remove...ie” How to tweak a talkie; “Oh I’d love to be an Oscar (Why her!) winner”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED


“Schbuzzle” of the Week:

“Oh I’d love to be an Oscar (Why her!) winner...”


“... that is what I’d truly like to be,

’cause if I were an Oscar (Why her!) winner

everyone would be in love with me!”


Take the last word in a buzz phrase from a popular movie that won multiple Oscars. 

Replace its last letter with the two letters that flank
it in the alphabet to name a popular entertainer who has won many Grammys but no Oscars. 

Who is this entertainer?

What is the buzz phrase?


Appetizer Menu

Note: We are proud to unveil this week the debut of “GB’s Bafflers” on Puzzleria! The new feature is the brainchild of our friend GB. 

His inaugural puzzle, serendipitously and cinematipitously, dovetails beautifully with this week’s Oscar theme. 

Cinematic Sci-Fi Appetizer:

A “cinenym” of an antonym of “remove...ie”

🎥Take the title of a classic Science Fiction film in two words, fifteen letters. That film is
universally considered to be groundbreaking; a pioneer; and culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant. 

The title includes a repeated vowel and a repeated consonant. Remove the second instance of each of those. 

Then remove from the beginning and end of the result four letters in order that spell a noun
that is a synonym of an antonym of “remove”.  

The remaining letters, in order, form a nine-letter two-word term for what we all are now experiencing.  

What is the film title?  

What are we now experiencing? 

Hint: The film’s visual effects team was nominated for an Oscar at the Academy Awards.  


MENU

“Nick Is Just A Four-Letter Word” Slice:

Take me to the Nicknameolodeon

Two main characters in movie nominated for a best-picture Oscar each had a nickname that included a four-letter word. 

Switch the positions of two letters in one four-letter word to spell the other four-letter word. 

Who are these characters?


Riffing Off Shortz And Regan Slices:

Barnyard creatures barnstorming

Will Shortz’s April 18th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Theodore Regan of Scituate, Massachusetts, reads:

Name a famous actor — 4 letters in the first name, 7 letters in the last. You can change the first letter of the actor’s first name to name a bird. And you can change the first letter of the actor’s last name to name a mammal. Who’s
the actor?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Regan Slices read:

ENTREE #1 (ROAD HOG ENTREE... for those eating Greecy Turkey off of fine China)

Name a puzzle-maker — 8 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. You can rearrange these 13 letters to spell three words:

1. a nymph, beginning with a vowel, one might have found on on the forested hills of the Areopagus in Greece,

2. the dwelling place of a dryad (a nymph related to the Areopagus nymph), and

3. a commercial establishment or house of foreign trade in China.

Who’s the puzzle-maker?

What are the nymph, dwelling place and commercial establishment?

ENTREE #2

Oscar Hammerstein II is the only person named Oscar who has won an Oscar. He did it twice, for Best Original Song.

Name a playwright named Oscar who never won an Oscar. 

Add an “r” to the end of his surname to spell a new 6-letter surname shared by two male members of the Academy who between them have either won or been nominated for more than 20 Oscars. 

The first names of those two men sound like the two names in the title of a 1980’s Grammy-winning song (but that are spelled differently).

Who is the playwright named Oscar?

Who are the two men who between them either won or were nominated for more than 20 Oscars?

What is the Grammy-winning song?

ENTREE #3

Name a famous singer — 5 letters in the first name, 6 letters in the last. 

You can remove the first letter of the singer’s
first name to name a university town in the Midwest. 

And you can change the first letter of the singer’s last name to name a university that has lately been in the news. 

Who’s the singer?

ENTREE #4

Name a famous past entertainer and actress — 7 letters in the first name, 4 letters in the last. 

The second syllable of the entertainer’s first name sounds like the name of a trained mammal. 

And the entertainer’s last name is an object often associated with such a mammal. 

Who’s the entertainer?

ENTREE #5

Name an actress — 4 letters in the first name, 8 letters in the last. The actress’s first name is a bird. And you can rearrange the eight letters of the actress’s last name to name a five-letter mammal and a three-letter prefix associated with birds. 

But you can also rearrange the eight letters of her last name to name a Eastern
U.S. state postal abbreviation and something the mammal has four of.

Who’s the actress?

What are the prefix and the mammal?

What are the postal abbreviation and what that certain mammal has four of?

Hint: The last name of a character the the actress portrayed on TV is a reptile.

ENTREE #6

Name a stately and plump literary character — 4 letters in the first name, 8 letters in the last. You can change the first letter of the character’s first name to name a bird. 

And you can change the first of the first four letters of the literary character’s last name to name a second bird. You can rearrange the remaining four letters in the last name to spell (no, not a third bird, but rather) the name of a character played by Teri Garr (who was also an Oscar nominee for Best Actress in a Supporting Role in the movie “Tootsie”... it was a “Tootsie role”).

Who’s the literary character?

What are the pair of birds and the character played by Teri Garr?

ENTREE #7

Name a famous author — 7 letters in the first name, 7 letters in the last. 

Remove six consecutive letters, the first five of which are the name of a French city. 

The result is certain birds.

Who’s the author?

What are the birds?

ENTREE #8

Name a famous past radio personality — 4 letters in the first name, 8 letters in the last. 

Add two letters to the beginning of the first name to spell a bird. 

Remove four letters from the end of the last name to spell where this bird may perch. 

Who’s the personality? 

What are the bird and the perch.

ENTREE #9

Name a famous author — in 7 letters and with a bit of punctuation in the name. 

Duplicate the first three letters and place these trios of letters side-by-side to name a type of insect. 

Replace the last letter of the remaining four letters with an “n” to spell a mammal.

Who is the author?

What are the insect and the mammal?

ENTREE #10

Name an American cultural icon associated with “dropping balls” and “pyramids,” 4 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. 

You can replace the first letter of the icon’s first name with two letters to name a young bird. 

Or, you can change the second letter of the icon’s first name with one letter to name a different bird. 

And you can remove the first letter of the actor’s last name to name a third bird. 

Who’s the icon?

What are the three birds?

ENTREE #11

Name a late European author, first and last names, and a living three-time Oscar nominated actress, first and last names. 


Two of those four names are “George” and “Laurie.” 
The other two names can be put next to each
other to spell a bird. 

Change one letter in the name of the bird to form something abrasive. 

Who are the author and actress?

What is the bird?

What is the abrasive thing?

ENTREE #12

Name a trusted journalist — 6 letters in the first name, 8 letters in the last. The journalist, while a student at the University of Texas at Austin, appeared in a play with fellow student Eli Wallach (who at the age of 94 received an Honorary Oscar  for his contribution to the film industry from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences).

Remove the first letter from the journalist’s first name, leaving a synonym of “change.” Put that first letter in place the fourth letter of his last name, thereby “changing” the last name so that it spells a pair of four-letter birds. 

Who’s the journalist?

What are the pair of birds?

ENTREE #13

Name an actor, screenwriter and director who was nominated for two Oscars — 4 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. 

The Oscar nomination he received for a screenplay involved a movie which climaxed
at a church wedding. 

You can change the first letter of this person’s first name to name a bird. 

The first three letters of this person’s surname spell a second bird. 

Place the 4-letter site of a well-known wedding in front of the remaining two letters in the surname to name a third bird.

Who’s this actor/screenwriter/director?

What are the three birds?

Dessert Menu

Working To Perk Up A Screenplay Dessert:

How to tweak a talkie

Take a memorable ten-word quote from the script of a classic Oscar-winning film. Insert a “t” somewhere in the last word. 

The result arguably improves the quote by adding more information. 

What are the original last word and the word it becomes?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup,


Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.