Thursday, April 15, 2021

Deletion and change begets depletion of change; Enhancement means “even more handsome!” “Paging Doctor Frankenstein...” When you draw blanks fill them in! An improbable blend;

 PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!π SERVED


Schpuzzle of the Week:

When you draw blanks fill them in!

The four letters in the first half of the “blanked-out” verb in this sentence ________ in the second half of the verb. 

What is the verb that belongs in that blank?

Hint: Take the first half of the eight-letter verb that belongs in the blank. 

It spells a four-letter verb for what can be done to the second half of the eight-letter verb. 

That second half is a four-letter noun.

Appetizer Menu

Global Brand Appetizer:

An improbable blend

Think of two religious words that are opposites  four and seven letters, respectively. 

Put them together and rearrange to get a well-known, international brand name. 

What are the opposites and what’s the brand?

Here’s a hint: the brand has a well-known nickname that rhymes with one of the opposites.

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Dance The Light Fundango Slice:

Deletion & change begets depletion of change 

Name a popular type of fundraiser in two words. 

Delete a letter from the second word and change a letter in the first word to form two
new words associated with an activity that might deplete one’s funds. 

What are these four words?


Riffing Off Shortz And Baggish Slices:

“Paging Doctor Frankenstein...”

Will Shortz’s April 11th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Steve Baggish of Arlington, Massachusetts, reads:

Think of part of the body in seven letters. Add an “N” and rearrange all the letters to name two more parts of the body (none related to the original word). What body parts are these?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Baggish Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Name three articles of clothing that may be worn (at least for a while) by an ecdysiast, in 4, 5 and 7 letters. (The 7-letter clothing article is hyphenated.) 

Now take a 5-letter word for what some people might say spectators of ecdysiasts do to themselves while witnessing these “dances,” or what the ecdysiasts themselves do to themselves while performing such “dancing.”

Rearrange all these 21 total letters to name a puzzle-maker (first and last names) and his hometown. 

What three articles of clothing are these?

What do the dancers and spectators do to themselves?

Who is the puzzle-maker?

ENTREE #2

No body’s perfect. People whose ears don’t work may be “____.” Those with bad legs may “____.” Others with faulty tongues or palates may “____.”

Take the twelve letters in those three four-letter words that belong in the blanks. Add a new 13th letter, a “t”,  to the mix. 

Rearrange this “baker’s-dozen” of letters to form three new “occasional” body parts:

1. one that vanishes when you arise from your chair,

2. another which is one of two that appear when you flash a broad smile, and

3. a third that comes and goes while you’re engaged in a game of roshambo.

What are the three words that belong in the blanks?

What are these “occasional” body parts?

ENTREE #3

Think of two common parts of the body that together total six letters. 

Add a “B” and rearrange all the letters to name a word for a “lopsided” roof (but not the kind of roof you find in your mouth). 

What body parts are these?

What is the “lopsided roof word?

ENTREE #4

Think of parts of the body in eleven letters. Subtract an “n” and rearrange the remaining ten letters to name:

1. another part of the body, and 

2. a plural seven-letter word for the eleven-letter body part in the form of disembodied powdery keratin residue. 

What body parts are these?

ENTREE #5

Backers of the recently defeated and disgraced president are willing to spend their bucks to tour, for example, Trump Tower in Midtown Manhattan

Rearrange the sixteen letters in “Trump backers tour” to name three synonymous (and apt, given the president) names for parts of the body. 

What body parts are these?

ENTREE #6

It was late-morning. I was fly-fishing along the banks of the Flathead River in Montana’s Glacier National Park. 

Just as I was lowering my whiskered catch into my wicker creel, a park ranger approached me, pointing to the timepiece on his raised left arm.

“Piscatory game harvesting,” he blurted, is verboten on the Flathead before noon!”

Quick as a flash in a frying pan, I snatched my catch from my creel and tossed it back into the cool crystal-clear current.

Rearrange the combined letters of the creature I briefly caught (7 letters) and profession of the ranger (6), to spell three body parts: What the ranger’s timepiece encircled (5) and two human body parts that are also parts of the timepiece’s body (4 and 4).

What are the creature and profession?

What are the three body parts?

ENTREE #7

Think of a hollow part of the body, above the neck, in two words of five and six letters. Write it twice. Rearrange all 22 letters to spell four words:

1. a European country (5 letters),

2. a “holy headquarters” in that country (7), 

3. what Michelangelo used the Sistine Chapel ceiling as (6), and 

4. a verb for how an artist like Michelangelo applies paint to a ceiling or a more conventional surface... or what a hen does to eggs. (4).

What are the country, the “holy headquarters,” what Michelangelo used the Sistine Chapel ceiling as, and the verb.

What is the body part?

Hint #1: Dristan, Claritin and other decongestant products sometimes show diagrams that include this body part in their advertisments.

Hint #2: “What Michelangelo used the Sistine Chapel ceiling as” is the next thing boxers hit after they get hit really hard.

ENTREE #8

Think of three singular body parts: of a lion, of a rooster, and of a kitten. 

Rearrange the combined seventeen letters in these body parts to spell three words: the first and last names of a poet associated with free verse, and a word for Judith Durham, Athol Guy, Keith Potger or Bruce Woodley.

What are these three body parts?

Who is the poet?

What is the word for Judith Durham, Athol Guy, Keith Potger or Bruce Woodley?

ENTREE #9

Note: The two puzzles in this entree were posted this past Sunday on Blaine’s Puzzle Blog.

A. Think of the seven-letter body part that is the answer to Steve Baggish’s NPR puzzle. Add the ROT14 of an “n” and rearrange all eight letters to name a second body part and a part of a dining room set. 

Spell a slang term for a third body part backward and place it after the second body part and dining-room-set part to form a pair of compound words. 

What three body parts, dining-room-set part and pair of compound words are these?

B. Think of the seven-letter body part that is the answer to Steve Baggish’s NPR puzzle. Add a letter other than an "n" and rearrange all eight letters to name two words, each which form a new compound word if you place a word for a common oviparous creature in front of  them. What is this body part is this? What are the two new compound words you can form?

Dessert Menu

Keeping Up Appearances Dessert:

Enhancement means “even more handsome!”

Name a two-syllable place patronized by those seeking to enhance their physical appearance. 

Change a vowel to a different vowel and
rearrange the result to name specifically what may be enhanced. 

What is this place and what may be enhanced?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, April 9, 2021

The Philosopher’s Meat Company; Name’s-the-same all-star-game; “Twerking”: a working (it) definition; HorizontAL VerticAL CapitAL; Proverbial phraseology

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!pi SERVED


Schpuzzle of the Week:

Proverbial phraseology

An author’s title character commits a sin which, according to the Book of Proverbs, leads to destruction. 

Remove a letter from the end of the authors surname. The result is a verb. 

That verb immediately follows the name of the sin within the the text of Proverbs. 

Who is the author? 

What is the verb?

What is the pertinent Proverbs text.


Appetizer Menu

Meaty Yet Metaphysical Appetizer:

The Philosopher’s Meat Company

🏭1. Take the name of a nine-letter company. 

Remove the second and seventh letters and replace them with a single T. 

Rearrange these eight letters to get a product of that company. 

What is it?

🥩2. Take the last name of a famous philosopher. 

Change the last letter to L. 

Rearrange these letters to get a type of meat. 

What are the philosopher and the meat?



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Paramaribo Suriname Slice:

Name’s-the-same all-star-game


An author’s surname is the same as a composer’s first name. 

The author’s first name and composer’s
surname are both world capitals. 

Who are the author and composer?


Riffing Off Shortz And Engler Slices:

HorizontAL VerticAL CapitAL

Will Shortz’s April 4th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Steve Engler of Wayland, Massachusetts, reads:

Write in capital letters the name of a popular vehicle brand. Move two vertical lines closer
together. Add a horizontal line. The result will
be another popular vehicle brand. What names are these?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Engler Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Take a six-letter word for a positive spiritual force that flowed through a group of guys from the Bible, the number of people in the group and the singular form of their footwear. 

Rearrange the combined letters of these three words to spell the name of a puzzle-maker and his hometown.

Now take a two-word description, in six and five letters, that describes each of the three passages below:

“A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger.”

“Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me... and you will find rest for your souls. For my
yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”

 “Love is patient and kind; love does not envy or boast; it is not arrogant or rude. It does not insist on its own way; it is not irritable or resentful.”

Rearrange those 11 letters to form the name of the puzzle-maker, but not his hometown.

Who is the puzzle-maker?

What are the positive spiritual force that flowed through the group from the Bible, the number of guys in the group and the singular form of their footwear?

What is the two-word description that describes each of the three biblical passages?

ENTREE #2

Write in capital letters the name of an island country in the South Pacific. Move two vertical lines closer together. Add a horizontal line. 

The result will be a suffix that can follow eye-, cup-, use-, woe-, bash-, play-, soul-, wake or meaning-. 

Move the horizontal line you added to a different spot. 

The result is the beginning of a Spanish word for a  sport that ends in -bol.

What country is this?

What is the suffix? What is the beginning of the Spanish word?

ENTREE #3

Write in capital letters the name of a freshwater crustacean that resembes the lobster but is usually much smaller, in eight letters. 

Move two vertical lines closer together. Add a horizontal line. 

The result will be “what an  ember becomes” and the color of that future ember. 

What crustacean is this?

What are the future ember and its color?

ENTREE #4

“The bronco ______ was bucked furiously by the wild stallion. But, despite the _______ that formed on his calloused hand, his grip on the rein remained tight.”

Write in capital letters the seven-letter word
that belongs in the second blank. Move two vertical lines closer together. The result will be the six-letter word that belongs in the first blank.

What words are these?

ENTREE #5

Write in capital letters an adjective meaning “ornamented with intricate gold and/or silver wire metalwork.” 

Move two vertical lines closer together, then do the same to two other vertical lines, thereby decreasing to number of letters from nine to seven.

Remove the second letter of this result to form a verb meaning “saw eye to eye.”

Now take the same seven letters. Switch the second and fourth letters and remove the sixth to form a verb meaning “locked horns.”

What is the adjective associated with metalwork?

What are the two verbs?

ENTREE #6

Write in capital letters the first name of a character on a long-running TV sit-com – a “know-it-all” who spouts trivia and “nonsensical talk that has no meaning and conveys no intelligible ideas.” 

Move two vertical lines closer together. Add a horizontal line. 

The result will be a word for “nonsensical talk that has no meaning and conveys no intelligible ideas.”

Who is this sit-com character?

What is the word for nonsensical talk?

ENTREE #7

Write in capital letters the name of a stereotypical Revolutionary War instrument that is not a drum or bugle. 

Add three horizontal lines, one each to the first three letters. 

The result will be the final 40-percent of the
name of a Civil War figure.

What is the instrument?

Who is the war figure?


Dessert Menu

Def Dessert:

“Twerking”: a working (it) definition

Separate the three syllables of a word to form a possible dictionary definition for “twerking.” 

What is the word?

Hint: The definition contains three words containing nine total letters.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup,


Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you. 

Friday, April 2, 2021

Peggy is partial to purple and pink; “With a cluck-cluck here & a buck-buck there...” Birds do it, bees don’t, educated fleas? Maybe... Keeping cool in the heat of competition; The cryptic mystery of the cross... word

 P/UZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!p SERVED




Schpuzzle of the Week:

“With a cluck-cluck here & a buck-buck there...”

It is Sunday, April 10, 1960 in Mayberry, North Carolina. Andy and Aunt Bee pay a visit a poultry farmer named Aldy MacDonald. 

Bee needs to bake a birthday cake for Opie. And Easter is just a week away!

Aldy and Andy were boyhood pals, and young Andy often bicycled to the MacDonald Family farm to play. Andy, a precocious lad, had made up a nickname for Aldy that consisted of the last three syllables in the refrain of an obvious nursery rhyme/song. 

It is a nickname Andy still occasionally calls Aldy by, as a joke.

The trio visit the henhouse where Bee begins gathering three-dozen Grade-A eggs. 

Aldy helpfully hands Bee a wicker container, but gives her some dubious advice that consists of a common eight-word idiom, minus its initial word. 

When she is done hunting and gathering, Andy gives his aunt a three-word, five-syllable instruction, then they drive home now amply prepared for cake-baking and Easter morning.

Take the seven initial letters of what Aldy said to Bee. The first three spell a word. Say that word and the remaining four letters aloud. The result sounds like what Andy said to his aunt.

What did Aldy say, and then what did Andy say?

Appetizer Menu

Very Good Friday Appetizer:

The cryptic mystery of the cross... word

It’s Good Friday, a day associated with a cross.

But this particular Friday is particularly Good. 

Why? Because it will also be associated with a cross... specifically, a cryptic crossword puzzle created by our friend Patrick J. Berry (screen name cranberry).

This is the nineteenth cryptic crossword puzzle with which Patrick has graced Puzzleria!

Here are the links to Patrick’s eighteen previous cryptic crosswords on Puzzleria! Each is a masterpiece of crypticism!

ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEVEN 

EIGHT NINE TEN ELEVEN TWELVE THIRTEEN 

FOURTEEN FIFTEEN SIXTEEN SEVENTEEN EIGHTEEN

For those of you who may be new to cryptic crossword puzzles, Patrick has compiled a few basic cryptic crossword puzzle instructions regarding the Across and Down clues and their format:

The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer.

Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.

For example, (6) simply indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (5,3) indicates a five-and-three-letter answer like “cargo van,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”

For further insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword

The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!

Have a good time solving. After all, any Friday you get to solve a Patrick J. Berry cryptic crossword puzzle is a Good Friday...

Make that more than "Good"... it's an excellent Friday!


ACROSS

1. Some head off, taking car trip around part of California(9)

6. Picasso’s top pieces are beautiful, lasting originals(5)

9. Foreign correspondent’s report depicts a corrupt organization(7,8)

10. Attractive girl would be good in comic role(6)

11. Go on one to get back in shape(8)

13. Soul? It's in a different city(5,5)

14. A little for a lot, it’s said?(4)

16. Bachelor has wild party(4)

17. Silly to get groove back, “defying the odds” in story about singer?(4,6)

19. Hymn to go with return of spring?(4,4)

20. Unable to sleep during bad weather—almost a blackout!(6)

23. Accident here—sadly, all the miners die!(5,4,6)

24. Fancy a cracker? Yes(5)

25. Turned on radio, initially calm—getting latest from meteorologist, ultimately fear it’s bad weather(9)



DOWN

1. Dance around piano? Cut!(5)

2. Lingerie pervert craves? It’s erotic!(9,6)

3. Game allowed to get in way?(8)

4. Piece of turkey, no bread?(4)

5. Last-minute entertaining, having no budget(10)

6. Murphy Brown’s heart breaking (apt to break?)(6)

7. Operation in bar?(5,10)

8. “Scream”? Put in less recent film(3,6)

12. Note placed inside gift, as rule(10)

13. Journalist lover gets in the sack?(9)

15. Movie with Lemmon and Matthau—not the first duo to turn up on ocean, primarily (in questionable taste)(3,2,3)

18. “Number one” perfect beauty, raised in New York(6)

21. Passenger I had in back, needing first aid(5)

22. Drop in, humiliate a relative?(4)


MENU


Brrr-umal Slice:

Keeping cool in the heat of competition

Name a type of competition, in two words. 

Move the first letter of one word to the beginning of the other to spell what sounds like something cold and a word that describes cold air.

What is this competition?

What is something cold?

What word describes cold air? 


Riffing Off Shortz And VanMechelen Slices:

Birds do it, bees don’t, educated fleas? Maybe...

Will Shortz’s October 11th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Greg VanMechelen of Berkeley, California, reads:

Name something birds do. Put the last sound of this word at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you’ll name
something else birds do. What are these things?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And VanMechelen Slices read:


ENTREE #1

A pair of cinematic legends – a female and a male – with roots in the same European country are not related but share the same surname. Their first names begin with the same vowel.

One of the legends was an actress who in a classic film said, “Richard, I tried to stay away. I thought I would never see you again, that you were out of my life.” As she speaks, the eyes of the viewers are drawn not to her eyes or lips but rather to another facial feature – a feature down which, as the film is rolling, something else is also rolling.

However, spending hours on end on a sofa or in a theater watching classic films is not wise. It might make you sluggish. Health professionals therefore encourage you instead to (1) move more. They also recommend that you (2) get more sleep, (3) reduce stress, (4) avoid smoking, (5) limit alcohol consumption, (6) eat a nutritious diet, (7) avoid added sugar, (8) stay hydrated and (9) be social. If you follow these nine recommendations, say the experts, you will boost your ______ _____.

Rearrange the combined letters in the surname of the two cinematic legends, the actress’s facial feature, and what health professionals say you can boost. The result is the name of a puzzle-maker and his hometown.

Who is this puzzle-maker and his hometown? 

What are the four words you rearranged?

ENTREE #2

“Fastenation”

Name two fasteners, one and two syllables,

(If you’d purchase them, both would be “billables.”)

One is shaped like a U

And the other’s a glue...

Write them down in these  blanks: ______, _____                                                      (...both are “fillables”).

From the first, strike the final two letters

Then switch first and last sounds, like typesetters

Will at times have to do.

The result, when you’re through,

Sounds like Word Number-One, you go-getters!

Okay, okay, enough of that silliness... here’s the prose version of this puzzle:

Name two fasteners, in one and two syllables. The first is shaped like a U, and and the other is a glue. 

Remove the final two letters from the U-shaped fastener. Put the last sound of this result at the start and the first sound at the end, keeping the vowel sound as it was. The final result, phonetically, will sound like the “gluey” fastener... you go-getters!

What are these two “fastenating” fasteners?

ENTREE #3

Take the surname of our most athletic U.S. president, one who once played a game against the Chicago Bears, and who chose law school over an opportunity to play for the Green Bay Packers! He was also a scratch golfer. 

Put the last sound of this name at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you’ll get the name of a fictional character featured in a series of direct-to-video comedy films focusing on golf, auto racing, fishing, football and baseball.

Who are this president and fictional character?

ENTREE #4

Take a two-word synonym of “initial attempt” in which two identical letters appear consecutively. Remove the second one.

The first word has remained intact after the letter removal. Put the last sound of this word at its the start and the first sound of this word
at its end.

Now move the space between the two-word synonym one place to the left and replace it with a hyphen. The  result is something you prepare in a wok.

What is it?

ENTREE #5 

Name an idiom for an especially irritating, aggravating, or obnoxious person, thing, or situation. 

The fourth and final word in the idiom is a body part.

Take a part of that body part, specifically the back part. 

Put the last sound of this word at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you’ll name the first word in the idiom. 

What is this idiom?

What is the “back part” of the body part in the idiom

ENTREE #6

A mascot who resembles a miniature version of Peter Pan appears on a cereal box. 

The mascot is associated with a nationality and a holiday.

Take the month associated with the holiday. 

Put the last sound of the month at the start and the first sound at the end to spell the singular form of a word that appears on the cereal box along with the mascot. 

What are this month and mascot?

Hint: The name of the mascot rhymes with “Chuckie.”

ENTREE #7

Take one of the fifty U.S. states. 

Put the last sound of this state at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically
you’ll name a word that appears somewhere in the text of this puzzle. 

What state is this?

What is the word in the puzzle?

ENTREE #8

One of the great players in NBA history was known by a nickname that was an abridgement of his given first name. 

Put the last sound of this nickname at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you’ll name one of the benefits he reaped for being so talented.

He played on championship teams with two franchises led by Phil Jackson and Pat Riley, who appreciated his capacity to stay calm, steady and focused, even under extreme
pressure – in other words, this player did not _____ under pressure.

Take the word in that blank. Put the last sound of that word at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically you’ll name the title of the role played by Jackson and Riley.

Who is this player?

What benefit did he reap?

What didn’t he do under pressure?

What role did Jackson and Riley play?

ENTREE #9

Name an eight-letter hyphenated word that means “of the highest quality, first-rate.” It is an adjective that many would use to describe four presidents surnamed Roosevelt, Jefferson, Roosevelt and Lincoln, for example.

Put the last sound of this word at the start and the first sound at the end, and phonetically

you’ll name counsel that a fifth president’s conscience may have once whispered to him, when he was a lad, during a time of temptation, in two words.

What is the synonym of “first-rate?”

What did the future president’s conscience perhaps whisper to him?

Dessert Menu

Filling The Basket Dessert:

Peggy is partial to purple and pink

During the morning hunt, little Peggy puts only the ones with pink and purple shells into her basket. 

What is curious about what Peggy does and what she does it to?

Hint: The curious nature about what Peggy does is related to wordplay.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup,


Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.