Friday, September 17, 2021

Pawsing to ponder under palms; Idol worship in the Book of Joel? Pineapple rightside-left cake? Gripped by the metatarsals of time (or perhaps metacarpals?) Common cures, characters and computers

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER  6!ฯ€ SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Pineapple rightside-left cake? 

Name dishes you might serve for dinner. 

Double the middle letter and spell the result backward. 

The final result will name what you might serve for dessert. 

What are these dishes and desserts?

Appetizer Menu

Bolts Of Enlightenment Appetizer:

Common cures, characters and computers

1. ๐Ÿ’Š๐ŸนName a common kind of medicine. 

Add an “a” and rearrange the result to name a popular brand of liquid refreshment. 

What are this medicine and brand of liquid refreshment?

2. ๐Ÿ“šName a famous European literary character in one syllable. 

The name is also used in a famous North American brand name. 

Identify the character and brand name.

3. ๐Ÿ๐ŸŸ๐Ÿ–๐Ÿ’ปName a device many outdoorsmen use to attract animals, in two words. 

Rearrange the letters to name two well-known brands of computers. 

Name the device and the computer brands.

MENU

To-marrow Always Comes Slice:

Gripped by the metatarsals of time (or perhaps metacarpals?)

Name two consecutive periods of time, like Wednesday and Thursday, for example.

Rearrange the combined letters of these two time periods to spell two words: 

1. a name of a bone, and 

2. an antonym of an adjective that describes that bone. 

What are the two consecutive periods of time?

What are the bone and the word describing it?


Riffing Off Shortz And Parker Slices:

Idol worship in the Book of Joel? 

Will Shortz’s September 12th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Charley Parker of Exton, Pennsylvania, reads:

Think of two famous singers with the same five-letter first name. Take the last name of one of these singers. Switch the second and third letters. Then advance the resulting first and third letters each to the next letter in the alphabet. The result will be the last name of the other singer. What singers are these? 

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Parker Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Think of a puzzle-maker, first and last names. Delete the first name’s last letter. Three words can be formed from the remaining letters:

* Three consecutive letters spell a “crate” of pairs;

* Four consecutive letters anagram to the shape of the colors above the “crate,” and

* The remaining letters, in order, spell one of many who were healed by Jesus. 

What are these three words?

Who is the puzzle-maker?

ENTREE #2

Think of a famous singer and a fictional character who have the same five-letter first name. 

Take the last name of the singer. Advance the first letter to the next letter in the alphabet and place a space and a “p” between the third and fourth letters to spell something you might find in a pasture. 

The last syllable of the fictional character’s last name is a synonym of “pasture.” 

The first, second, third and sixth letters of the last name spell a prefix associated with what you might find in the pasture.

Who are this singer and fictional character?

What might you find in the pasture? What is the prefix?

ENTREE #3

Think of two famous singers. 

Take the last name of the first singer. 

Switch the second and third letters. Then advance the fourth letter seven places later on in the alphabet (so A would become H, for
example). 

The result will be the last name of the second singer.

Now take the first name of the first singer. Switch the fourth and fifth letters. 

Then move the first letter one place earlier in the alphabet (so B would become A, for example); advance the second letter one place later in the alphabet; and move the third letter eleven places earlier in the alphabet. Place these new-letter results, respectively, in the second, third and first positions (in front of the switched fourth and fifth letters).

The result will be the first name of the second singer.

Who are these two singers?

ENTREE #4

Think of a famous singer with a five-letter first name and four-letter surname. 

ROT13 the letters in the first name to spell a piece of fishing equipment. 

ROT10 the letters of the surname and place an “a” between the third and fourth letters. 

The result, if you insert a space someplace, is the title of a signature song by one of the singer’s professional peers. 

Who are the singer and his professional peer?

What are the piece of fishing equipment and the signature song title?

ENTREE #5

Name an ought-to-be-more-famous singer/songwriter with a five-letter first name and four-letter surname. 

ROT22 her surname to spell a word no one would use to describe her excellent songs and her own versions of them.

Now switch the third and fourth letters in her
surname and ROT24 the result to get what sounds like the title of an early 1980s hit song penned by a singer/songwriter who was greatly influenced by the more-talented yet less-appreciated artist.

Who are these two songwriters?

What word does not describe the output of the less-appreciated artist?

What is the early 1980s hit song title?

ENTREE #6

Name a famous singer with a five-letter first name and four-letter surname. 

Take the surname. Advance the first and third letters each to the next letter in the alphabet, and move the fourth letter nine places back in the alphabet.

Uppercase the resulting four letters to name a band that has been around for more than half a century, and which has been called “a stellar and wildly unpredictable live act.”

Who is this singer?  

What is the band?

ENTREE #7

Name a famous singer with a five-letter first name and four-letter surname. 

Take the first name. ROT3 all but its middle letter to name a low multi-stemmed woody
plant.

Take the surname. ROT14 its letters. Invert and take the mirror image of the resulting first letter. Place the third and fourth letters (and a virgule) in front of the first two letters and uppercase the result to form the name of a band that has sold more than a fifth-of-a-billion records worldwide.

Who is this singer? 

What is the band?

Dessert Menu 

Palm Desert Dessert:

Pawsing to ponder under palms

Name something associated with palms. 

Remove the first two letters and a space to name something associated with paws. 

What are these two things – one associated with palms, the other associated with paws?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, September 10, 2021

Land mass, Manhattan, mixed meanings & Mom’s mmmm’s; Hitchhikin’ Wolfgang Van Hailin’? Curlicue, McCoy and castor oil... Inverted-e words & internal rhyme; Libretti with crystal candelabras & mums in Western trousers

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!ฯ€ SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Libretti with crystal candelabras & mums in Western trousers 

Crystals, trousers, Westerns, libretti (or librettos) and East Asia mums

Besides being plural, what do those five things have in common?

Appetizer Menu

Skydivergent Appetizer:

Land mass, Manhattan, mixed meanings & Mom’s mmmm’s

Note: Mark Scott (aka “skydiveboy,” his screen name) has generously allowed us to use these four clever puzzles on Puzzleria! 

He originally sent them
to Will Shortz who, for one reason or another, declined to use them on NPR.

Holy Mass?

1. ⛪Take a well known North American land mass everyone knows by a one-word name. 

Switch the positions of two letters within that word and say it out loud and it will sound exactly like a well known holy site in another part of the world. 

What are these two places?

Ten-gallon Manhattan

2. ๐Ÿค  A boy from South Texas and a boy from North New York City happened to meet on a crowded Manhattan subway and realized they both had something in common when each asked the other, “What do you do?” 

Their answers, which are homophones, were “I ride the ______.” 
See if you can fill in the blank with each homophone.

Synonyms “antonymized”

3.๐Ÿ•ฎ Think of two three-letter nouns that are synonyms. 

Now think of a four-letter word that might follow each of them to come up with two very different meanings. 

What are these words?

Hint: One answer will be one word, and the other answer will be two words.

Treats spooner-fed by Mom

4. ๐Ÿคถ๐ŸฅThink of a two-word treat mothers like making that is popular with all ages. 

Spoonerize this treat to get something it should not have. 

What is this treat, and what it should not have?

MENU

Delmore SCHWArtz Slice:

Inverted-e words & internal rhyme

Take a fourteen-letter word with two properties: 

1. its syllables rhyme, and 

2. half its letters are the same letter.

(The hyphenated word “pell-mell,” for example, possesses these two properties.) 

The fourteen-letter word is itself a property associated with schwas. 

What word is this?

Riffing Off Shortz And Niederman Slices:

Hitchhikin’ Wolfgang Van Hailin’? 

Will Shortz’s September 5th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Derrick
Niederman, of Charleston, South Carolina, reads:

Name a famous person with 8 letters in the first name and 4 letters in the surname. The last name is a regular uncapitalized word with a single vowel. Change that vowel to make a new word that is humorously defined by the person’s first name. Who is it? 

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Niederman Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Name a puzzle-maker with seven letters in the first name and nine letters in the surname. 

Anagram these sixteen letters to write a three-
word caption for the image pictured here.

What is your caption? 

Note: Your caption should be in the past tense.

ENTREE #2

Name a famous person with 8 letters in the first name and 4 letters in the surname.

The first name is the second word in a country, and also the second word in that country’s capital.

Take that famous person’s surname.  

Change one letter to a “B” to spell an Indonesian provincial land surrounded by water. 

Change that “B” to a “M” to spell an African country surrounded by land.

Who is this famous person?

What are the country and its capital?

What are the provincial island and landlocked nation?

ENTREE #3

Name a famous person with 8 letters in the first name and 5 letters in the surname. 

The first name is also the name of  a U.S. state.

Remove one of the letters that appears twice in the surname. 

Spell the result backward to name what the Big Otter, Bullpasture and Brush do in that U.S. state.  

Who is this famous person?

What do the Big Otter, Bullpasture and Brush do in the state?

ENTREE #4

Name a famous somewhat recently deceased British person with 8 letters in the first name and 4 letters in the surname. The surname has a single vowel and can also be a regular uncapitalized noun that is a relative of hornworts (not Hogwarts!) and liverworts.

Change the first vowel in the first name to form an uncapitalized adjective with positive connotations. 

Change the single vowel in the 4-letter noun to an “e” to form a new noun with negative connotations. 

Now change that “e” to an “i” to form a second noun with negative connotations.

Placing each new nown after the adjective, in turn, results in two adjective-noun oxymoronic phrases.

Who is this famous British person? 

What are the two adjective-noun oxymoronic phrases?

ENTREE #5

Name a famous person with 4 letters in the first name and 4 letters in the surname. 

Change the last letter of the first name to a 2-letter abbreviation of a league he could have played in, but did not. Place this altered first name after the surname. 

The result is one of millions of delicate things you can see “floating” about Pasadena at the beginning of the year.

Who is this famous person? What do you call one of these “floaters”? 

ENTREE #6

A. Name a famous past American Formula One automobile racing driver with 4 letters in his first name and 4 letters in his surname. 

Change the short vowel in the surname to a long vowel sound of a different vowel. 

Saying the first name and altered surname (after adding the article “a” between them) now sounds like something dentists or gravediggers might do in the process of their work. 

Who is this racing driver? 

What might dentists or gravediggers do?

B. Name a famous American composer with 6 letters in his first name and 5 letters in his surname. 

The composer occasionally enjoys a four-course dinner at a five-star (⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐) restaurant. He is especially thirsty for water because he orders salty fare. His first and last names (after adding the pronoun “his” between them) sound like what the waiter might often do for the composer during the course of the courses. 

Who is this composer? What might the waiter do for the composer during the course of the four courses?

ENTREE #7

Name a British singer/songwriter with 5 letters in the first name and 5 letters in the surname. 

Change the first letter in singer’s surname.

The result is a cylinder one might find on the beach. 

Who is this singer/songwriter? 

What might be found on the beach?

Dessert Menu 

Bobbie Herder Dessert:

Curlicue, McCoy, castor oil...

Whenever Bobbie Herder partakes in her favorite casual hobby she keeps a log of everything she sees. 

For example, one day she wrote down: “freebie,” “flamenco,” “sandpaper,” “curlicue,” “wobbler,” “blackboard,” “Reuben,” “McCoy” and “castor oil.”      
You can thus describe Bobbie with a two-word phrase that, when you spoonerize it by switching its initial letters, sounds like a second two-word phrase that also describes Bobbie. 

What are these two phrases?

What are the nine entries that you would have written (more accurately) into Bobbie’s logbook on that day had you been in her shoes?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, September 3, 2021

Names of different types of people; Stax o’ waxing rhapsodic; Silver screen and printed page; Worker, workplace and work; Toss an old word out, coin a new one

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 6!ฯ€ SERVED

Schpuzzle of the Week:

Silver screen and printed page 

A 1947 movie along with its 1949 sequel seem to be related to a 1951 novel. 

Name an actor, actress and fictional character to explain why.


Appetizer Menu

Birthday gift from a “birthday boy” Appetizer:

Names of different types of people

Note: This week’s edition of “Puzzle Fun by Bobby Jacobs” is extra-special. Indeed, you might call it a “celebration.” Bobby is celebrating his 28th birthday today, September 3, with 4 puzzles on Puzzleria!

Think of it as Bobby’s “birthday gift” to US!

Bobby – who is a whiz at algebra, geometry, calculus, trigonometry, number theory, topology, real analysis, and beyond – reminds us that today is a “perfect birthday” because 28 is a “perfect number.” A perfect number is a positive integer that is equal to the sum of its positive divisors, excluding the number itself. Thus 28 – with 1, 2, 4, 7, 14 as its divisors – is perfect because 1+2+4+7+14=28. Bobby also celebrated a perfect birthday when he turned 6. He won’t celebrate his next perfect birthday until he turns 496.

Another Note:  The four images in the collage appearing in week’s edition of “Puzzle Fun by Bobby Jacobs” correspond to Bobby’s four puzzles. Bobby says he calls the third image  a “twelfie” because it is a “selfie” with 12 people in it.

Now, let’s open Bobby’s gift to us: 

A capital with character

1.⭐ Take the name of a literary character. Remove the last two letters. Replace the 2nd-to-5th letters with a “t”. You will get a world capital. 

What character and capital are these?

Nominal binomials?

2.๐Ÿ‘ฑ๐Ÿ‘ฆ Take two common English boys’ names and add an “a”. 

You can rearrange the letters into an adjective meaning “related to algebra, geometry, calculus or trigonometry.” 

What adjective is it?

Lights, camera, animation!

3.๐ŸŽฅTake the name of a famous actor. Remove the last three letters of the actor’s first name. 

Switch the second and second-to-last letters of the actor’s last name. Then change the last name’s last letter to “m”. 

You will get the name of a famous cartoon character. 

What are the names of the actor and cartoon character?

Timely prime placement

4.๐Ÿ”ข Take the name of a famous mathematician. 

Rearrange the letters at the prime-number positions in that name to get what the mathematician is known for. 

Who is it?

MENU

“New-mismatism” Slice:

Toss an old word out, coin a new one

Take a word whose seven lowercase letters appear within a seven-letter string in the alphabet, like “outpost,” for example. 

Replace its first letter with two duplicates of its last letter. Invert the new first letter. 

The result is an eight-letter “non-word” that would be a good neologistic candidate to replace the original seven-letter word. 

What are this “non-word” and original word?

Riffing Off Shortz And Carr Slices:

Stax o’ waxing rhapsodic 

Will Shortz’s August 29th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Ari Carr of Madison, Wisconsin, reads:

Name a form of musical composition. If you
say the word quickly, you’ll name something, in two words, that you might buy in a music store. What is it?
 

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Carr Slices read:

ENTREE #1

Name a puzzle-maker and their hometown. 

Anagram these combined letters to form three names: the surname of an “amazing” debunker, the first name of a “Wilde” playwright, and the first name of a “sweet” Billy Wilder-directed-movie character.

Who is this puzzle-maker?

Who are the debunker, Wilde playwright and Wilder character?

ENTREE #2

Name an introductory musical section or movement that begins with a two-consonant blend (like the “bl-” in “blend”) trailed immediately by a long-a sound (like the “a” in “trailed”). 

Replace the two-consonant blend with the consonant that is sandwiched between those two consonants in the alphabet. After this new consonant place a vowel that almost always follows this consonant in the English language. 

The result sounds like a half-century-old pop-culture “time-capsule” also known as a “disco-biscuit.” What is this musical movement?

What is a “disco-biscuit?”

ENTREE #3

You visit a music store. Name something, in one word, that you might see there at the store – something with an beautifully elegant shape and elegantly beautiful tone that you just have to purchase.

Switch the order of two adjacent vowels in this purchase to name a word that literally means “see there.”

What are these two words?

ENTREE #4

Name a form of musical composition that Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky composed. Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto, for example, is considered one of the most technically difficult works for the violin. It is Pyotr’s concerto but, alas, a concerto is not the form of musical composition you must find to solve this puzzle.

No, we are looking for a musical composition with fewer than three syllables. It is also
Pyotr’s composition but it was also appropriated by a producer to be used 
in a “botanical scene” in his 1940 movie,  So this particular musical composition became this producer’s ____ as well as Pyotr’s ____. 

The musical composition that belongs in either blank is a homophone of the possessive form of the producer’s first name. 

What is this form of musical composition?

Who is the producer?

ENTREE #5

Name a form of musical composition. 

The first four letters spell what sounds like a word for a foolish or stupid person. 

The final five letters spell a synonym of a fraud or impostor.

What is the form of musical composition?

What are the word and synonym?

ENTREE #6

Name a form of stately dance. 

The first five letters spell what sounds like a word for a dusty mass of microspores. 

The final five letters, if you add an “L” to the end, spell what sounds like the adjectival form of the organ negatively affected by the dusty mass of microspores.

What is it?

ENTREE #7

Name a form of musical composition. 

The first three letters spell what sounds like a word for what polite people, like you and I, usually do before opening a door to enter a room. 

The final five letters spell what sounds like what you might do to the doorknob if what you do initially doesn’t elicit any response. 

What is this musical composition? 

Dessert Menu 

Professional Dessert:

Worker, workplace and work

Take a word for a professional person, in three letters, and a synonym of their workplace, in five letters. 

Anagram the combined letters of these two informal words to name another profession. 

What is this profession?

Who is the professional person? 

What is the synonym of their workplace?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.