Friday, December 11, 2015

Flagged for a personal fowl; Recalling a hymn? Robert, Robert, Bart & Heriberto; Capital reduction; DDoouubbllee vviissiioonn

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER e5 + pi4 SERVED

Welcome to Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!, the Eleventh day of the Twelfth Month of the Fifteenth year (or should that be Sixteenth year?) of the Third Millennium of the Common Era (CE).

Puzzleria! this week features an excellent puzzle slice contributed by ron, a valued Puzzlerian! His puzzle, listed as an entrée slice under this week’s MENU, is titled: 
Book Cooker Slice: DDoouubbllee vviissiioonn.  

Our guest puzzle creator posts astute comments not only on this this Puzzleria! blog but also on Blaine’s puzzle blog, a discussion forum where Will Shortz’s weekly NPR puzzles are discussed and dissected (pronounced with a short “i” and accented on the second syllable, not the first). Thank you, ron, for another of your many wonderful contributions to P!.

Rounding out this week’s five-square-meal-menu offerings are a repetitive morsel, ubiquitous appetizer, a ripping-off-Shortz entrée slice, and a dessert that for the second week running is hot off the griddle. Please enjoy:

Morsel Menu
 
Repetitive Morsel:
Recalling a hymn?

A timely hymn contains five words, three different words, eight different letters, and a total of 18 letters. Remove a letter that is repeated from the one word that is not repeated, a proper noun. One of the repeated words is a verb. Replace each of these verbs with its antonym, a verb beginning with G. The result is a new five-word phrase that some people in a major U.S. city may have been chanting in recent days.

What is the hymn and what is this phrase?

Hint: The phrase consists of 13 letters. (But you deduced that, didn’t you?)
 
Appetizer Menu

Ubiquitous Appetizer:
Robert, Robert, Bart & Heriberto

Robert Hanophy, Robert Masters, David Bart and Heriberto Seda were among those who were involved... (please replace the ellipsis and complete the sentence by filling in the following blanks with four appropriate words):
__ __  
__  
__ __ __ __ __ __  
__ __ __ __ __ .

Rearrange the 14 letters in those four words to form a six-syllable word that has suddenly been ubiquitous in news stories this past week.


MENU

Book Cooker Slice:

The word “bookkeeper has three consecutive double letters. A common two-word phrase, if you remove the space, also has three consecutive double letters.

What is this two-word phrase?


Ripping Off Shortz Slice:
Capital reduction

This is a puzzle “piggybacking” on Will Shortz’s NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle of December 6.

Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a figure from Greek mythology.


Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters. The remaining letters form a figure from Greek mythology.

Name a U.S. state capital. Drop two of its letters. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form figures from Greek mythology.

Name a U.S. state capital. Drop the two letters of its state postal code. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a Canaanite or Phoenician deity.  


Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters, if you wish, but it is also okay if you do not do so. The remaining (or existing) letters form a figure from Greek mythology.

Name a U.S. state capital. Drop two of its letters that spell out a common verb. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a figure from Greek mythology.

Name a U.S. state capital. Drop none of its letters. The remaining letters form the name of the site that is home of the Temple of Hera and the Temple of Zeus.

Hint: The 14 letters of the current postal abbreviations of the seven states involved in this seven-part puzzle can be rearranged to form four words of 3, 3, 3 and 5 letters: 1.) the title of a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical (with “The”) that was made into a movie and live television production; 2.) a two-word character from that musical; and 3.) the name of an Ada-based company that that markets products, several of which include on their packaging the last word (usually followed by a period) in the title of the book that was the ultimate inspiration for the musical. 

Dessert Menu

Taking Offense Dessert:
Flagged for a personal fowl

Matt Tobin did not appreciate being flagged for offensive face mask penalty, a call made by Ruben Fowler an NFL official since 2006. On the following play from scrimmage, the Philadelphia offense lines up on the Cowboys’ 17-yard line. There are 8 seconds on the game clock and the Cowboys are ahead 33 to 28. Quarterback Sam Bradford, who has called a sweep right, takes the snap from Jason Kelce. Tobin’s assignment is to block linebacker Jeremy Mincey, but he instead ignores Mincey and heads straight for Fowler, who is standing in the end zone, and blind-side-chop-blocks him.

What could be the headline for this fake and fabricated story? The one I have in mind is a four-word headline with words of 1, 6, 7 and 3 letters: an article, common noun, verb, and a common noun that is a truncated form of a 6-letter common noun.

Rearrange the letters in that fake headline to form a possible three-word headline of an event that occurred last August but made the news this past week. The plausibly possible headline – consisting of 5-letter common noun, 7-letter verb and 5-letter proper noun – rhymes with the ersatz NFL headline.

What are these headlines?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!


Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Tuesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


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67 comments:

  1. OOh, I've never been the first commenter before.

    A Morsel Question, LegoOLeaderOfThePack: Are we supposed to anagram the non-repeated word after we remove its one repeated letter? (I know the hymn and the word, and most of the phrase, but can't make any sense out of the word in question left in its original order ... not that I've found an anagram that makes any sense either.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ViolinTeddy,
      Congrats on being the first commenter. Another fine feather in your cap. Amazingly, no anagramming whatsoever is required for solving this morsel of a puzzle!

      The non-repeated word is a proper noun, both before and after removing the repeated letter. There are two pairs of repeated letters in the word. In one pair the letters are adjacent to each other. (See ron's ddoouubbllee vviissiioonn puzzle.) Remove the letter from that pair.

      Also, the two identical words you replaced with the "G-word" are an approximate rhyme of a word the chanters (of the phrase, not the hymn) might insert in the phrase immediately before the altered non-repeated proper noun.

      LegoWhoIsActuallyAFollowerOfThePack

      Delete
    2. AAAAAH, GOT IT!! (I had merely failed to check on what the removed-one-letter-still-a-proper-noun word really referred to.) Now it makes total sense!

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Good job. I have most of the ROSS...

      Delete
    2. Did you drop that smartphone from a ground floor room over on Blaine's blog?

      Delete
    3. I see, you dropped your smartphone from a second floor room!

      Delete
  3. I've got an entry for Ron's puzzle also, although it seems to me it might have made a good 'dessert' puzzle!! : o )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nice hint, ViolinTeddy.

      clotheslover, if you are out there browsing, I (and perhaps others here) would be curious to know how your Thanksgiving Day visit went... if you care to share, that is.

      skydiveboy, how about a hint to your answer to ron's puzzle... the answer that is different from the one ViolinTeddy hinted at?

      LegoDoingHisBestImpressionOfpatjberryInThatRequestToskydiveboy

      Delete
    2. Yeah, Clotheslover, we miss you! Did you get back from Thanksgiving at the professor's house okay?

      Delete
    3. skydiveboy,
      When Scouts (BSA) are roughing it out in the woods, far from the nearest latrine, I believe they resort to taking a “troop poop” and/or a “troop pee.” If they are Indian Scouts with hairpieces… well, you know.

      LegoEvidentlyIsTooPCToSeeHimselfSayingTPOr2P

      Delete
  4. Since I can't seem to get anywhere with the state capitols (any of the 7), I tried to start from the end, but can't find ANY Tony Award-winning Broadway musicals/live TV/movies with 14 letters in their titles (not counting the beginning "The")....are you sure it has 14 letters? I'm stumped.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT,

      It is worded somewhat unclearly. To clarify: The letters in 1.) the musical, 2.) the character in the musical, and 3.) the Ada-based company combine to total 14 letters. They are words of 6, 5 and 3 letters, but not necessarily in that order.

      LegoSaysJohn14:6IsAHintToTheCompany

      Delete
    2. Oh, silly me....I get it now re the musical NOT having 14 letters...duh!

      Delete
    3. I meant to add, however, t hat I have no idea what an Ada company might be. NOt a single clue (and your hint was no help)....

      By now, I am getting all mixed up between two puzzles circling around 14 letters, and having trouble keeping straight which one I'm trying to work on!!

      Delete
    4. Thank you for that link, Word Woman. I was not familiar with Ada (Byron) Lovelace. I found also this New Yorker link.

      I was familiar with Vladimir Nabokov’s ”Ada” novel (I’m a Nabokov nut), and of a mess of places named Ada, and the two major national acronyms dealing with dentistry and disabilities. Ada, of course, is prime crosswordese.

      LegoWhoWantsToBeKnownAs”ThePrinceOfParallelograms”OrPerhaps”TheRajahOfRhombi”

      Delete
    5. I am an Ada fan, both Ada Lovelace born December 10, and Ada Comstock, born December 11, and died December 12. Ada Comstock started out in Minnesota, came to Smith College, became Dean and interim President of Smith before becoming the President of Radcliffe. The Ada Comstock program for non-traditional age Smith students and a Smith house (dorm) carry her name.

      Henceforth, PoP it is then, Lego. ;-)

      Delete
  5. Also, I believe I have the four-word phrase for the Appetizer. However, I have thus far failed to be able to anagram it into any 16-letter word (despite looking up lists of 16 letter words.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The 14-letter word (which I have to my best recollection never written or seen in print or even heard before this past fortnight -- although its meaning is very clear) contains six syllables.

      The letters of a somewhat more common four-syllable, ten-letter form of the word can be rearranged to form a two-word half-slangy synonym of "more indolent LSD." Both forms of the word are etymologially related to the name of a vegetable.

      LegoSays"EatYourVegetables,NotYourLSD!"

      Delete
    2. VT,
      The word contains 14 letters, not 16 letters.

      LegoThatIs,XIV,NotXVI

      Delete
    3. I'm afraid none of the above helps me in the slightest. I am only more confused.

      Delete
  6. I have the two-word phrase with three consecutive pairs of letters, but that's it so far. I think I have the four words, but can't get the 14-letter word. Basically I need a lot of help. I've looked up hymns and can't find anything that fits, the football story is just impossible, and don't get me started on that state capital novel you seem to have written. Hints please!

    ReplyDelete
  7. I will say I think I know the musical and especially the last word of the title of the original book it came from. Anyone watching TV in the past few weeks should know this one. Unfortunately, that's as far as I've got with that. Hints please!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Got the hymn! Not as hard as I thought, just needed to find another list of hymns!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,

      Hints:
      UA: See my hints in my 9:31 PM response to ViolinTeddy.
      ROSS (the hint at the end): The company is on this list. The character is like a terrorist… in that he/she a heartless sort who sets off metal detectors.
      ROSS: The initial letters of the seven capitals can be rearranged to form the first and third words of a three-word expression in the form “___ as ____” that appears in a 1913 book titled “Patchwork Girl of Oz” by L. Frank Baum.

      TOD: It helps to know Tobin’s position and the specific type of official Fowler is. Remove the S from the 7-letter word in the fake headline, leaving the name of a Minnesota-based corporation. The plausible, three-word headline contains a creature that appears to wearing a hairpiece and a creature that is bald, separated by a homophone of a synonym of “one levy.”

      LegoDroveMyChevyToThe(DOTToPayMy)Levy

      Delete
    2. Four consecutive letters in the interior of UA’s 6-syllable, 14-letter word form the first name of the elder daughter of the star of a movie based on the book mentioned in the ROSS hint at the end of the puzzle.

      LegoSaysThatStarWasBormInTheNorthStarState

      Delete
    3. If I think that daughter is who it seems to be, then I had the wrong six-letter word in the four-word phrase...because I need a letter clearly NOT in the word I had already chosen....

      Delete
    4. JOY OF JOYS and relief untold, I FINALLY got it! (The 14-letter heretofore unheard of word, that is)....now if only the seven stupid state capitals/Greek folks would work out...no progress on that yet.

      Delete
    5. Incidentally, I just FOUND that very word in a list, not that I'd seen it before I figured it out at long last. My point is, that it MUST have existed before the last two weeks, after all.

      Delete
  9. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Well, the daughter's name helped me get the 14-letter word. I don't know about the rest of it, though. Have you seen how long that list is? It's longer than your puzzle, if such a thing is possible.

    ReplyDelete
  11. One state capital works for 3 of the seven situations.

    ReplyDelete
  12. I daresay the Repetitive Morsel was my quickest solve ever.

    The first two words in the Ubiquitous Appetizer fill-in-the-blanks are virtually dictated by the syntax of the context. After looking up a couple of the names involved, I thought I had the other two words, but when a 14-letter, 6-syllable word failed to present itself, it became apparent that I had chosen the wrong 6-letter word. The process by which I made this erroneous choice can be described by another 14-letter word whose last n letters match those of the answer word precisely, but whose first 14-n letters are a permutation of the name of a color.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul,
      I am very envious of your quicksilver solve of the RM. How did it come to you so promptly, if you can say so before the Tuesday revealfest?

      LegoThinksPaulDeservesFiveStars

      Delete
    2. I'd prefer to discuss how looooong it took me to comprehend your use of 'envious'.

      Delete
    3. Below is a copy of a comment I made over at Blainesville. Please note the date and time. Solving puzzles before they're even presented may be a routine occurrence for skydiveboy, but this was a first for me:
      PaulThu Dec 10, 03:49:00 PM PST
      Oh go, Oh go, Emanuel

      Not a political statement. I don't know enough about the situation in Chicago to indulge in finger-pointing. Just grabbing the obvious joke before anyone else does.

      --------------------------------------------------

      IN A ZODIAC TRIAL --> RADICALIZATION
      The generalization IN A MURDER TRIAL just doesn't fit.

      Delete
    4. Paul,
      I had not seen your Blainesville post. Honest! All this proves to me is that great minds think alike or, because it is an "obvious joke," as you correctly note, that all minds think alike!

      LegoMasterOfTheObvious

      Delete
  13. I got an answer to the Book Cooker Slice that has been hinted at, although I didn't really need the hint. But I realize it's the thought that counts, so I'll just say "Thank you, young man," and leave it at that.
    My other answer to BCS is somewhat related to a couple of pictures that appeared on this blog within the last month.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. GOOD DEED (e.g. helping a little old lady cross the street)

      LOOK KEEN (as in this song. The brand is unspecified; it could be Burma-Shave.

      Delete
  14. I have a few of the Capital Reductions. As ron has pointed out, there seems to be a bit of overlap.

    Here's one:
    Start with an ancient city of some religious significance. Envelope it with a not-quite-synonym of a word found in the title of a well-known hymn to get the name of a mythological figure. Preface the same city with an anagram of the surname of a TV personality often associated with a musical instrument sometimes found in a temple, and bookend that whole thing with the chemical symbol of the element named after the mythological figure to get a state capital.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul,
      Please give a hint regarding the TV personality often associated with a musical instrument sometimes found in a temple.

      LegoSingsICan'tGetNoPuzzleTraction

      Delete
    2. The TV personality was born in a major city in the same state as the capital in question.
      You apparently already have the mythological figure, so you should have the capital, unless you don't understand what I mean by 'bookend', which is perfectly understandable, as I was exercising a bit of 'puzzletic license' so as not to make it too much of a 'walk in the park'. Perhaps I should have used "earmuff'?

      Delete
    3. Paul,
      I do not already have the mythological figure. I was trying to work backward.
      Your "hint":"The TV personality was born in a major city in the same state as the capital in question," does not help because I know neither the mythological figure nor the capital! (I am beginning to empathize with patjberry in his eternal quest for hints!)

      It is true that I, as a denizen of these frozen-tundral regions, am more familiar with earmuffs than with bookends. (I have begun reading a handful of books in my lifetime but have never really stuck around long enough to come to their ends!)

      You puzzle, sir, is indeed no "walk in the park"... it is a"slog on the obstacle course"!

      LegoSaysTheStuffBetweenMyEarmuffsIsStartingToHurt

      Delete
    4. Did I really type 'envelope'? Of course I meant the verb 'envelop', not the noun 'envelope'.
      It's been quite a while since I've solved a cryptic crossword. I hope 'envelop' and 'bookend' (or 'earmuff') qualify as container indicators. That is how I intended them to be understood. With that in mind, some tedious cross-referencing between a list of state capitals and the Periodic Table should narrow things down quite a bit.
      I thought you had the mythological figure because of a word you used in your December 12, 2015 at 5:40 PM response, but apparently that was inspired by my choice of words describing my experience with RM, which was not an intentional hint to the mythological figure, but, well, if I knew what was going on in my subconscious, it wouldn't be my subconscious, would it?
      It's interesting that you refer to an 'obstacle course'. Quite appropriate for the specific park I have in mind.

      Delete
    5. Paulzzerian!
      Great puzzle!

      My use of “that word” in my praise of your lightning-fast RM solve was pure coincidence! My post followed yours by a mere 5 minutes, and I don’t refresh my browser that often. And, if I did, I just do not think that quickly. My thought processes are more like mole asses in January than like, well, you know.

      (Quick tangent: Let's declare January 2 to be Mole Asses Day. What we do is to wait for the mole to emerge from its burrow and, if its anterior precedes its posterior, we will experience 4.428571... weeks of hype before Groundhog Day. Butt, if its posterior precedes its anterior we will experience 52 weeks (before the next Mole Asses Day rolls back around) of hype rehashing the story about how that doggone pesky mole went and stuck its butt out its hole [kinda Klein-Jarish!] instead of its head!)

      That was a word from our sponsor. Now back to Paul's puzzle...
      Paul, do you find it odd that your “not-quite-synonym of a word found in the title of a well-known hymn” is not itself found in the title of a well-known hymn? I do. (I guess we could always broaden [dilute!] our definition of “hymn.”

      One of my issues in solving your poser was that I was hung up on the “TV personality often associated with a musical instrument.” The only one that I could think of is a legendary comedian with a surname that begins with the same letter as that of your TV personality.

      Butt, as they say, "To Err is human (even though it is a holy city), to solve, divine."

      LegoThinksPaul’sSubconsciousHasAPeriscopeAndRegularlyFiresTorpedoes

      Delete
    6. The ancient city is UR.
      Amazing Grace appears at the top of this page. GRACE and MERCY are kind of the same, but not quite. If I understand it correctly, when The Prodigal Son returned home, the Father mercifully refrained from beating the shaving cream out of him and graciously threw a party instead.
      Anyway, UR wrapped up in MERCY is MERCURY. The chemical symbol for mercury is Hg. The state capital that starts with 'H' and ends with 'g' is H(arrisb)(ur)g, Pennsylvania. Chuck BARRIS was born in Philadelphia, and created The Dating Game, The Newlywed Game, and The GONG Show, which he also hosted. He also wrote the song Palisades Park.
      And you might find a GONG in a Buddhist temple.

      Here is a 'merciful' hymn

      Delete
  15. WTF? I still need more hints on the football story and the state capitals, please.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,
      ROSS:
      The 7 capitals…
      > The first name of a reasonably famous cousin of an unsuccessful U.S. presidential candidate
      > Put the first letter of the surname of a rock legend in front of his widow’s middle name
      > anagram the word that names [http://wordwomanpartialellipsisofthesun.blogspot.com/ and http://puzzleria.blogspot.com/ ], for two examples
      > a near homophone of Ms. Berger’s first name followed by a homophone of Ms. Du… no, I’m gonna do away with that one; it’s too easy… followed by a homophone of Mr. Vincent’s first name
      > anagrams to what Puzzlerians! might exclaim (two words) if they solve only four of our five puzzles this week…
      __ __ __ __ __ __
      __ __ __!
      > anagram the surname of a legendary comic and follow it with the first 60% of the surname of a prez he was buddies with
      > replace the final two vowels of a country (that Coach tutored Sam about on Cheers) with an occasional vowel

      TOD:
      Fake football headline:
      __ (common article, c’mon!)
      __ __ __ __ __ __ (football position)
      __ __ __ __ __ __ __ (zeroes in on)
      __ __ __ (official usually associated more with horsehide than pigskin)

      Plausible recent headline:
      __ __ __ __ __ (singular form of the nickname of Matt Tobin’s football team)
      __ __ __ __ __ __ __ (synonym of assails)
      __ __ __ __ __ (synonym of outdo)

      LegoIsHerebyOfficiallyAllHintedOut

      Delete
  16. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Got the football puzzle and ROSS!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Puzzlerians!
    The day before yesterday (Friday) on Blaine’s puzzle blog, David posted a great link to a very worthwhile and polished website called FiveThirtyEight.

    As David noted, the site is initiating a new weekly math/logic/probability puzzle called the Riddler. (David is a whiz at numbers as well as words.) FiveThirtyEight will upload a new Riddler each Friday, the same day we upload our posers on Puzzleria!

    On Saturday, jan posted his answer to the puzzle, and early this morning – just hours before Blaine uploaded his Sunday blog with the new NPR puzzle – I responded to jan’s comment. Because I posted my comment at the tail-end of Blaine’s last-week thread (after most of us had hit the hay), I will reprint it here, below:

    jan,
    I got 19 and 63 also. For a 10,000-story building I get 199. For a million-story building I get 1,999.

    To make a generalization (my regards to Paul), for a building with 10-to-the-nth-power stories, the minimum number of smartphone drops will be [2 times (10-to-the-n-divided-by-2-power)] minus 1.

    Curiously, this formula seems to only approximate the number of drops when n is odd. For example, for n = 3, the formula yields 62.2455...

    Thanks very much, David, for linking to this puzzle and website, which I have bookmarked.
    I plan to discuss this wonderful poser more on Puzzleria!

    LegoFormulaicGeneralizer

    ReplyDelete
  19. Puzzlerians!,
    Extra credit:
    One of the people I mention in my TOD football puzzle either has a first name that is the same as the surname of a past late NFL star, or has a surname that is the same as the first name of the late star.

    The first name or surname that the star does not share with our fellow in the puzzle is a word for a "type of learning" that can be anagrammed into what likely happened to Ruben Fowler's anterior cruciate ligament after Matt Tobin blindsided him with his chop block, in the form of "It ____."

    LegoSaysMolesThatBurrowOnGridironsMustBeCarefulNotToDamageTheirPosteriorGluttealLigaments

    ReplyDelete
  20. ROSS:
    -MADISON (-M)>>>ADONIS or MADISON (-S)>>>DAIMON, Inferior Greek Deity.
    -HELENA (-A)>>>HELEN of Troy.
    -ST. PAUL (-PL)>>>TAUS, Greek crosses, or SANTA FE (-SF)>>>ANTAE, figures of Greek mythology.
    -ALBANY (-NY, postal code for New York)>>>BA'AL, Phoenician deity.
    -(-H)ELENA or HELEN(-A).
    -MADISON (-IS, a common verb)>>>DAMON, one of the sea spirits (Telchines).
    -OLYMPIA, site of the Temple of Hera & of Zeus.

    MADISON is particularly fruitful:

    MADISON (-M)>>>ADONIS
    MADISON (-S)>>>DAIMON, Greek demon.
    MADISON (-IS)>>>DAMON
    MADISON (-DA)>>>MINOS, SIMON (another of the Telchines.)
    MADISON (-ON)>>>MIDAS
    MADISON (No dropped letters)>>>DAIMONS
    BOISE (-BI)>>>EOS

    BCS:
    The "COMMON" two-word phrase with 3 consecutive double letters is SWEET TOOTH.
    Congratulations to all who solved it and special congratulations to SDB who found 2 answers!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Is there such a thing as a SUB BOOKKEEPER or SUB-BOOKKEEPER? Spell check lists it. It has four sets in a row.

      My answer is GOOD DEED. Something every Boy Scout is supposed to do every day.

      Delete
    2. I forgot to mention FEED DOOR.

      Delete
    3. I forgot: BOISE (-BE)>>>IO(S).

      Delete
  21. My answer is GOOD DEED as well. SWEET TOOTH is good too. I should have thought of that one.

    ReplyDelete
  22. The postal codes of each state can be rearranged to spell WIZ, TIN MAN, and AMWAY.
    The phrase IN A ZODIAC TRIAL can be rearranged to spell RADICALIZATION.
    A TACKLE TARGETS UMP=EAGLE ATTACKS TRUMP
    The hymn is "O Come O Come Emmanuel", which can be changed to "O Go O Go Emanuel"(Rahm Emanuel, that is).

    ReplyDelete
  23. I did know Phoenix and Olympia had to do with Greek mythology, and Helena could be changed to Helen. Other than that, I'm not really an expert on Greek mythology. Should have gotten Adonis for Madison, though.

    ReplyDelete
  24. I concentrated more on the postal code anagrams for that one.

    ReplyDelete
  25. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 1:

    Morsel Menu

    Repetitive Morsel:
    Recalling a hymn?
    A timely hymn contains five words, three different words, eight different letters, and a total of 18 letters. Remove a letter that is repeated from the one word that is not repeated, a proper noun. One of the repeated words is a verb. Replace each of these verbs with its antonym, a verb beginning with G. The result is a new five-word phrase that some people in a major U.S. city may have been chanting in recent days.
    What is the hymn and what is this phrase?
    Hint: The phrase consists of 13 letters. (But you deduced that, didn’t you?)

    Answer:
    O Come, O Come Emmanuel;
    O Go, O Go Emanuel;

    Appetizer Menu

    Ubiquitous Appetizer:
    Robert, Robert, Bart & Heriberto
    Robert Hanophy, Robert Masters, David Bart and Heriberto Seda were among those who were involved... (please replace the ellipsis and complete the sentence by filling in the following blanks with four appropriate words):
    __ __
    __
    __ __ __ __ __ __
    __ __ __ __ __ .

    Rearrange the 14 letters in those four words to form a six-syllable word that has suddenly been ubiquitous in news stories this past week.

    Answer:
    Robert Hanophy, Robert Masters, David Bart and Heriberto Seda were among those who were involved...
    IN
    A
    ZODIAC
    TRIAL


    The letters of which can be rearranged to form:
    RADICALIZATION

    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  26. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 2:
    MENU

    Book Cooker Slice:
    DDoouubblleevviissiioonn
    The word “bookkeeper has three consecutive double letters. A common two-word phrase, if you remove the space, also has three consecutive double letters.
    What is this two-word phrase?

    Answer:
    Sweet tooth


    Ripping Off Shortz Slice:
    Capital reduction
    This is a puzzle “piggybacking” on Will Shortz’s NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle of December 6.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a figure from Greek mythology.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters. The remaining letters form a figure from Greek mythology.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop two of its letters. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form figures from Greek mythology.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop the two letters of its state postal code. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a Canaanite or Phoenician deity.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop one of its letters, if you wish, but it is also okay if you do not do so. The remaining (or existing) letters form a figure from Greek mythology.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop two of its letters that spell out a common verb. The remaining letters can be rearranged to form a figure from Greek mythology.
    Name a U.S. state capital. Drop none of its letters. The remaining letters form the name of the site that is home of the Temple of Hera and the Temple of Zeus.
    Hint: The 14 letters of the current postal abbreviations of the seven states involved in this seven-part puzzle can be rearranged to form four words of 3, 3, 3 and 5 letters: 1.) the title of a Tony Award-winning Broadway musical (with “The”) that was made into a movie and live television production; 2.) a two-word character from that musical; and 3.) the name of an Ada-based company that that markets products, several of which include on their packaging the last word (usually followed by a period) in the title of the book that was the ultimate inspiration for the musical.

    Answers:
    MADISON – M = ADISON >> Adonis
    HELENA – A = Helen (of Troy)
    SANTA FE – A – N = STAFE >> Fates
    ALBANY – NY = ALBA >> Baal
    PHOENIX – O = Phenix;
    PHOENIX – 0 = Phoenix
    DES MOINES – DO = ESMINES >> Nemesis
    OLYMPIA – 0 = Olympia

    Hint:
    The 14 letters of the current postal abbreviations of the seven states involved in this seven-part puzzle:
    WI + MT + NM + NY + AZ + IA + WA
    can be rearranged to form
    1.) “The WIZ”
    2.) TIN MAN
    3.) AMWAY, the name of an Ada, Michigan-based company that markets many products sold by the ounce (oz.). The title of the book that was the ultimate inspiration for the musical is The Wonderful Wizard of OZ.

    Lego…

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  27. This week’s official answers for the record, Part 3:

    Dessert Menu

    Taking Offense Dessert:
    Flagged for a personal fowl
    Matt Tobin did not appreciate being flagged for offensive face mask penalty, a call made by Ruben Fowler an NFL official since 2006. On the following play from scrimmage, the Philadelphia offense lines up on the Cowboys’ 17-yard line. There are 8 seconds on the game clock and the Cowboys are ahead 33 to 28. Quarterback Sam Bradford, who has called a sweep right, takes the snap from Jason Kelce. Tobin’s assignment is to block linebacker Jeremy Mincey, but he instead ignores Mincey and heads straight for Fowler, who is standing in the end zone, and blind-side-chop-blocks him.
    What could be the headline for this fake and fabricated story? The one I have in mind is a four-word headline with words of 1, 6, 7 and 3 letters: an article, common noun, verb, and a common noun that is a truncated form of a 6-letter common noun.
    Rearrange the letters in that fake headline to form a possible three-word headline of an “event” that occurred last August but made the news this past week. The plausibly possible headline – consisting of 5-letter common noun, 7-letter verb and 5-letter proper noun – rhymes with the ersatz NFL headline.
    What are these headlines?

    Answer:
    Fake Football Headline:
    A Tackle Targets Ump
    Plausible Recent Headline:
    Eagle Attacks Trump

    Lego…

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  28. Had NO time or chance to get to PUzzleria today until now. I haven't even LOOKED at the official answers, but am plunking in what I had....I'm sure there must be lots of mistakes in the STate Capitols puzzle....the more I tried on that, the more confused I became!

    Morsel: O COME O COME EMMANUEL and O GO O GO EMANUEL

    Appetizer: IN A ZODIAC TRIAL, RADICALIZATION

    Book Cooker Slice: SWEET TOOTH

    Ripping Off Shortz:

    NOTES: To make up WIZ and ANY WITCH, after 4, 5, 6 and 7 are solved, we still need HICTWI. The only state with an "H" in postal abbrev, is Hawaii, thus Honolulu is 1, 2, or 3.
    CT means we have to have HARTFORD for 1, 2 or 3.. And the remaining WI means we have to have Madison.

    1. & 2: in who-knows-what-order: HARTFORD, CT & HONOLULU, HI. (Can't solve any Greek figures for either of these.)
    3: MADISON, WI (because it's supposed to become plural figures, and is the only one with an S.) HOW ABOUT DROP THE LETTER M, rearrange, and get ADONIS!
    4. ALBANY, NY [BAAL] (NO IDEA what the hint meant, though.)
    5. DES MOINES, IA (From Lego's hint, "missed one") But, no idea what it anagrams into for Greek figure.
    6. PHOENIX, AZ (HOPE/NIX, according to the hint, but I can't find a two-word verb in here to reach any Greek figure)
    7. OLYMPIA, WA (Though the hint makes no sense to me.)

    Musical: (The) WIZ
    Character: ANY WITCH
    Ada-based company: 3 letters, so they must be AAI or IAA or AIA; has OZ.. on packages. Have no idea what any of those might have to do with stuff sold with ounces on packages.

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  29. Answer to my December 15 at 1:08 AM Extra credit Challenge:
    Philadelphia Eagles offensive tackle Matt Tobin shares a first name/surname with past late great NFL star Tobin Rote.
    Rote’s surname is also a word for a "type of learning" (rote learning). “Rote” can be anagrammed into what likely happened to Ruben Fowler's anterior cruciate ligament after Matt Tobin blindsided him with his chop block, in the form of "It ____." (“It Tore.”)

    LegoFearedThatMattTobinMightHaveRote(DoubleSic)LegoAnEmailObjectingToHisFictionalCharacterizationOfTobinAsABlind-Side-Chop-Blocker

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