Friday, January 3, 2020

The 20s roar in crypticktockingly! Mugging for cameras at the café; Poetica Universalis (lyricism of the spheres); Diver of skies advises us to “Spoonerize!” “All this ‘clinical talk’ makes me blue”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Poetica Universalis (lyricism of the spheres)

Describe Mars, Milky Way or Galaxy, in two words. 
Add a letter to the end of this description to name two means to an end that are compared to one another in a poem. 
What are this two-word description and these two means to an end?
Note: The second “means to an end” is a more specific example of the broader, more general term mentioned in the poem.


Appetizer Menu

Lions, Dogs, Horses & Bears Appetizer:
The 20s roar in crypticktockingly!

The holidays seem to be becoming synonymous with the name Patrick J. Berry (screen name, “cranberry”) who this past Thanksgiving had his tenth Cryptic Crossword puzzle appear on Puzzleria! 
This week, in the wake of New Year (and “New Decade”) celebrations, we are reveling in the eleventh of Patrick’s Puzzleria! cryptic crossword puzzles (which, happily, keep cropping up like cryptockticktic clockwork!). 
Here are links to Patrick’s previous ten crosswords:
ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEVEN EIGHT NINE TEN
And here are a few basic cryptic crossword puzzle instructions:
Regarding the Across and Down clues and their format:
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (5, 3) indicates a five-and-three-letter answer like “cargo van,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For further insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!)  

ACROSS
1. Certain pets loved primarily by S. Caesar’s costar in show(6,4)
6. Nobleman expected to entertain king(4)
9. Had a braid out of place? Yes!(3,4,3)
10. Indeed, I think it’s correct(4)
11. Man left pub in terrible mood– we’ve all heard him before!(3,8)
15. Slow working dog?(7)
16. Surprise rattles characters, getting nervous(7)
17. Recent disorder involving some inflammation of the stomach(7)
19. Manage to do it?(4,3)
20. Never easy dancing with different partners shortly before 11 is heard?(3,5,3)
23. Lion’s first appearance in den(4)
24. Unfortunate sunbather, perhaps? It’s not top priority here(4,6)
25. Imaginary creature, still intimidating at first(4)
26. Get toy broken in crowd, looking for fair(6,4)
DOWN
1. Country Bear Jamboree No. 2?(4)
2. Wife’s long, terrible day(4)
3. Be inclined to go on record during trial: “There’s not much money in it!”(6,5)
4. Continue to misbehave(5,2)
5. Snapping a visitor, unable to get one in frame(7)
7. Got awfully rude? Not so on date!(10)
8. Texts excitedly about gypsy characters(10)
12. B-Be ugly as a horse?(5,6)
13. Plan for change of scenery to involve mountain climbing(10)
14. Weakling wants pity – sadly, gets little attention(10)
18. Vulgar-sounding song from pirate(7)
19. Creature – simple feline, say?(7)
21. Ruin card game with last hand(4)
22. Raised money over the phone(4)


MENU

Snapshot Slice:
Mugging for cameras at the café

An actor takes a seat at an establishment where drinks are served. He orders one. Presently, the waitress places a mug in front of his “mug...”
Double a letter in the surname of this actor. Place the letters of a synonym of mug in front of his altered surname. Switch the first two vowels of this result to name the drink in the actor’s mug.
Who is this actor and what is his drink?  
Hint: The first four letters of the drink are the last name of a satirist from the past who has the same first name as the actor.

Riffing Off Shortz And Scott Slices:
Diver of skies advises us to “Spoonerize!”

This week’s challenge, created by Mark Scott of Seattle, Washington (also known by his screen name skydiveboy”) reads: 
Everyone knows what a spoonerism is, right? That’s where you switch the initial consonant sounds of one phrase to get another – like “light rain” for “right lane.” Here’s the puzzle: Name a well-known world leader, first and last names. Spoonerize this, and you’ll get a phrase that means “to have confidence in one of the martial arts.” Who’s the leader, and what’s the phrase?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Scott Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Name two articles of clothing: a 3-letter word for what a banker with a motorcar never wears in the pouring rain, and a 5-letter word for a pair of above-the-knees hybrid britches. 
1. Double the last letter of the second word;
2. Switch the third letter of the first word with the second letter of the second word;
3. Move the fourth letter of the second word somewhere inside the first word.
The result spells a talented puzzle maker, first and last names. 
Who is it? What are the two articles of clothing?
ENTREE #2
Name a well-known world leader, first and last names. 
Spoonerize this, and you’ll get what sounds reasonably similar to a phrase that tells how a martial artist – who in the mid-1990s invested heavily in a fledgling web services provider – made a fortune. 
Who’s the leader, and what’s the phrase?
ENTREE #3
Name a not-so-well-known world leader, first and last names. The name of the republic of which this leader is prime minister contains multiple words. 
Spoonerize this prime ministers name, forming two parts. Ignore a long-E sound at the end of the second part. The two parts sound like two words for things that can be worn on the head.  
Who’s the leader, and what are the two things worn on the head?
ENTREE #4
Name a well-known past world leader, full name. 
Remove six consecutive letters from the interior of this name, leaving what sounds like the last name of an artist whose nationality was the same as that of the world leader.
Who are this leader and artist?
ENTREE #5
Name a well-known world leader, first and last names. The first two letters in the name spell the nickname of the winningest men’s basketball coach in the history of his Big Ten school. 
Change the third and sixth letters of the name, respectively, to the letters in a abbreviated synonym of “bathroom” to spell what sounds like the Big Ten school where the coach was a winner.
Who is this world leader? 
Who is the coach and what was his school?
ENTREE #6
Name a well-known 19th-century world leader, first and last names, 15 total letters.
Replace the fifth letter in the name with a duplicate of the eighth letter. 
The first seven letters spell what sounds like the name of a modern expressway in the land of this leader. The remaining letters spell a U.S. state capital.
Who’s the leader? What’s the expressway? What is the capital?


Dessert Menu

Cinnanonymous Dessert:
“All this ‘clinical talk’ makes me blue”

Name a word for a kind of talk. 
Place it at the end of a medical procedure to form what sounds like a synonym of  “blue.”
What are this procedure and synonym?
Hint: The word for the  “kind of talk” is an an acronym.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

49 comments:

  1. I've been at this for hours, with not very good results. So far, easily solved Entree #6, and with only a bit of trouble, Entree #1. Semi-agonized over Snapshot Slice, but DID finally get it (and like it!)

    I'd thought I was making headway on both the Schpuzzle and Dessert, but though I'm sure I have the beginnings of them, I can't seem to make them work out.

    Lastly, I fought for a LONG time with Entree #5 (knowing nothing about basketball at the Big 10 or anywhere else), but only JUST now hit the correct webpage, after going vainly through all 14 of the Big 10, looking for nicknames. Working somewhat backwards with the 'bathroom' abbrev DID help me pin things down at long last.

    I am too tired to try Entrees 3 and 4, and wasted a long time on #2 with no luck. Long past time for sleep.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The Ayatollah wants his money back, but it's too high for me, so the plot thickens. I have a gut feeling he'll be shaking a fist because I can't even begin to pay the big green right now. I only have a quarter.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. LAIR [L(ion)+AIR(5)]{Presumably, the Ayatollah would like his payment in RIALs}
      YETI [YET+I(ntimidating)] {I can't sing higher than MI, so YE will have to sing TI}
      SCREENPLAY [SCENER(ALP)Y] {The PLOT(or PLAN) thickens}
      ENTERIC [RECENT+I(nflammation)] {GUT}
      DUKE [DU(K)E] {FIST}
      STARTLE [RATTLES] {Begin(start)}
      CORSAIR [COARSE+AIR(8a)
      That's 7/28 or 39/156, depending on how you look at it; either way it's a QUARTER. Now I need to find a good counselor, one who believes in God, having normal reflection (9).

      Delete
    2. Oh, I forgot, The Big Green is one Dartmouth team, and the Corsairs are another.

      Delete
  3. Paul, maybe this is a matter between you and your therapist.
    Happy First Weekend of 2020!
    My niece Mia Kate is really into the 1920s, so she's really happy to get to live through a 20s decade of her very own!
    Currently Bryan, Renae, and the kids are spending Week One of "double-twenty" in New Orleans, so Mom and I got our own supper from Lee's Chicken. Delicious as always!
    Other than that, it's been another typical Friday night. I listened to Ask Me Another, and solved the Prize Crossword. I also need to do some more laundry. I'll get to that after I'm done here.
    As for this week's puzzles, I hope everyone is enjoying my latest creation. There will definitely be more where that came from, rest assured. As for my own progress with the other puzzles, the only one I haven't solved yet is Entree #3. Lego, I hope you have a great hint for that one. I'd love to be finished way ahead of time. Just give me what you've got, and I'll certainly do my best to figure it out. BTW great packaging of my puzzle! You're a true artist with an incredible gift! And, to those of you who are still afraid to tackle a cryptic crossword, I say try it. What have you got to lose? Just follow the Tutorial carefully, and be ready for anything. And above all, have fun!(Good luck, Dowager Empress!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the kind words about my "packaging" of your fine cryptic crossword puzzle, cranberry. We are glad to hear that you are working on creating more of them.
      As for:
      ENTREE #3
      Name a not-so-well-known world leader, first and last names. The name of the republic of which this leader is prime minister contains multiple words.
      Spoonerize this prime minister’s name, forming two parts. Ignore a long-E sound at the end of the second part. The two parts sound like two words for things that can be worn on the head.
      Who’s the leader, and what are the two things worn on the head?

      I would think "The name of the republic of which this leader is prime minister contains multiple words" narrows down the list of possibilities.
      The word for one of the things worn on the head is associated with Christmas. The other thing worn on the head is associated with monasticism. It is actually "extended headwear" which also covers part of the torso.

      LegoSaysTheHeadgearCoversTheTorso,LessSoOrMoreSo

      Delete
    2. Good Lord! Who would wear an ashtray on their head?

      Delete
    3. The guy on the right.

      LegoWhoWonders"ButWhoAmITo(Mike)Judge"

      Delete
    4. OOh, thanks for that hint, Lego...applying some hit or miss tenacity, plus logic, I just solved Entree 3.

      Delete
    5. You would think it narrows down the possibilities, but you'd probably be wrong. I just looked up "republics" and tried the multiple-word ones. When they had prime ministers, some of those did not have simple first and last names. And the ones who did, you couldn't make anything out of their names if you spoonerized them. Lego, I need more to go on here if I'm about to clear the board, as it were. And how do Beavis and Butthead fit into all this?!

      Delete
    6. cranberry,
      The name of the republic of which this leader is prime minister contains multiple words.
      There are 35 countries with multiple words in their names. This alliterative one is in North America.

      LegoWhoBelievesBeavisAndButtheadHaveNoConnectionWhatsoeverWithThisPuzzle

      Delete
    7. And now I am done! But since I have a puzzle of my own here this week, I'll keep checking back to see if anyone needs help with it.

      Delete
    8. Only a butthead would have tobacco on the brain.

      Delete
  4. CB, I've been honing my cryptic crossword skills on your last couple of puzzles. Looking forward to a quiet weekend with a fresh set of clues! Happy new year everyone.

    ReplyDelete
  5. MS, I hope you can solve the entire thing. I try not to be as difficult with my clues as they do in the Guardian or the Times. If you've ever done cryptics in GAMES/World of Puzzles, it should be about as easy as that. Good luck to you, and good luck to all!

    ReplyDelete
  6. So far, have all except the Snapshot Slice and the Dessert. Liked the Schpuzzle.

    For Entrée #4, suspect I have an alternate answer (actually 3). For the best-known of these 3, the head-of-state was indirectly responsible for the artist's death.

    Could use hints for the Snapshot Slice and the Dessert. Thought I had an answer for the Snapshot, but it didn't quite work out.

    The cryptic X-word seems harder to me than the earlier two ones. O luck at all so far, but have not spent much time working on it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I might venture a hint: the Snapshot slice drink sounds a little bit like an opera composer.

      I myself need a Dessert hint AND a Schpuzzle hint, and I still don't have entrees 2 or 4, whereas it seems that everyone else does. Frown....

      Delete
    2. Nice hint, VT
      Here are a few your you:
      Dessert:
      Dan's son William saved up his dough for a Caribbean cruise.
      Schpuzzle:
      Rambler...
      ...ville
      Entree 2:
      Official Daisy Red Ryder Range Model 1938 Air Rifle
      Entree 4:
      An airport and aircraft carrier named are named after the world leader.

      LegoWhoObservesThatAReallyBigFireIsCalledAThreeAlarmer

      Delete
    3. Your Schpuzzle and Entree #4 hints are making me doubt my answers for them. I may need to do further research.

      Delete
    4. Lego, I'm afraid I've made a mistake or two with the Schpuzzle and Entree #4. Do you have any other hints that may help?

      Delete
    5. Lego-
      WRT "LegoWhoObservesThatAReallyBigFireIsCalledAThreeAlarmer":

      And a REALLY BIG fire is called "Australia."

      Delete
    6. Good point, geofan,
      cranberry,
      Entree #4: Pablo Picasso observed that when Matisse dies, this artist "will be the only painter left who understands what color really is."
      Schpuzzle: The poet's first name is also the name of a city in Utah.

      LegoLoganProvo

      Delete
    7. I know the poet's name. I'm just unsure of the two-word description. Can you help me with that part?

      Delete
    8. Besides Mars, Milky Way or Galaxy, the two-word description applies to Jelly Belly, Hershey, Toblerone and Jolly Rancher.

      LegoAddsThatTheSecondWordInTheDescriptionAndTheFirstSyllableOfTheFirstWordInTheDescriptionRhyme

      Delete
    9. And NOW I am done! Thanks, Lego!

      Delete
  7. cranberry -- your new puzzle lives up to its forebears. I particularly liked 11-A, 24-A and 12-D. I played around with cryptics with a friend some time ago. My favorite clue was
    "Rastafarian campanologist's comment to cat".

    Keep these jewels coming.

    D.E.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Funny, I can't seem to figure out that clue of yours, DE. How many letters does it have? You know you're supposed to put them in parentheses at the end.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I'm afraid I have to give up on that one, DE. Nothing really comes to mind. Is "MON" in there somewhere?

    ReplyDelete
  10. CANDY BRAND(Y) [Reflections on Ice Breaking (1931), Ogden Utah]
    MAC SKORT > MARK SCOTT
    BENJAMIN NETANYAHU > NINJA-MAN BET ON YAHOO (seems like a long stretch)
    KEITH ROWLEY > WREATH COWL
    OTTO VON BISMARCK > AUTOBAHN, BISMARCK (ND)
    X-RAY, TED > X-RATED

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul,
      Your word "stretch" is warranted. "Benjamin" and "Ninja man" are not even proper approximate rhymes... remote rhymes would describe them more accurately.

      LegoObservesHoweverThatIfBenjaminHadBeenNamed"Moshe"ThenSpoonerizationWouldHaveAnsweredTheQuestion:"DidMiriamMeetSaulOnFacebook?"

      Delete
  11. Schpuzzle
    CANDY BRAND, CANDY and BRANDY(Ogden Nash)
    Appetizer Menu
    For cryptic crossword and clue explanations, see Lego's official answers.
    Menu
    Snapshot Slice
    (Al)PACINO, CUP, CAPPUCCINO(Al Capp)
    Entrees
    1. MAC, SKORT, MARK SCOTT
    2. BENJAMIN NETANYAHU(NINJA MAN BET ON YAHOO!)
    3. KEITH ROWLEY(WREATH, COWL)
    4. CHARLES DeGAULLE,(Marc)CHAGALL
    5. BORIS JOHNSON(William Francis Ryan)"BO", WISCONSIN
    6. OTTO VON BISMARCK, AUTOBAHN, BISMARCK(North Dakota)
    Dessert Menu
    X-RAY, TED, X-RATED
    Cranberry out!-pjb

    ReplyDelete
  12. Schpuzzle: CANDY BRAND + Y => CANDY BRANDY => CANDY LIQUOR
    (Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker – Ogden Nash)

    Snapshot Slice: ???? [VT's hint (Puccini) did not help; Lego never offered a hint for this one]

    Entrées
    #1: MAC, SKORT => MAC SKORTT => MAK SCORTT => MARK SCOTT
    #2: BENJAMIN NETANYAHU => NINJA MAN BET ON YAHOO
    #3: KEITH ROWLEY (Trinidad and Tobago) => Reith (WREATH), COWL
    #4: CHARLES DE GAULLE – RLESDE => CHAGAULLE => CHAGALL [post-hint]
    pre-hint: ADOLF HITLER – OLFHIT => ADLER (Friedrich)
    [Friedrich Adler was murdered at Auschwitz in July 1942,
    indirectly by Hitler, as a result of his policies.]
    #5: BORIS JOHNSON => BOWIS COHNSON => WISCONSIN, BO RYAN
    #6: OTTO VON BISMARCK / AUTOBAHN BISMARCK

    Dessert: ???? [Sun hint did not help]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. "X-rated" and "blue" are not related in my vocabulary, so I never would have gotten it. I got stuck on "depressed."

      Never got anywhere on the Cryptic this time (for me, much harder than pjb's last one). Only got 10A = EDIT (not even sure of that one).

      Delete
    2. Me either, geo (re your first paragraph above.)

      Delete
    3. geofan,
      My "scattershot" method of giving hints to my puzzles, in recent weeks, has resulted in gaps. When I fail to post a comment that includes hints for all puzzles, some puzzles fall through the cracks. I'll try to remedy this.
      I think your ADOLF HITLER – OLFHIT => ADLER answer to Entree #4 is excellent!
      You gave pjb's Cryptic Crossword a shot. Angels can do no more (as my mother used to say).

      LegoWhoWondersHowTheColorOfRobins'EggsCanBeConsideredLewd

      Delete
    4. Ooh, I just saw your comment in your answers, geo, about how PUCCINI didn't help...it had just 'hit' me how CAPPUCCINO and Puccini sounded so similar. Oh well.

      Delete
    5. Geofan, I too originally thought of ADOLF HITLER and ADLER, but there were actually two different German artists named ADLER that I could find. I didn't really know which to choose!

      Delete
  13. SCHPUZZLE: CANDY BRAND & Y => CANDY BRANDY ["Candy is dandy, but liquor is quicker", by Ogden Nash, on Ice Breaking]

    SNAPSHOT SLICE: AL PACINO => CUP & PACCINO => CAPPUCCINO [SATIRIST: AL CAPP]

    ENTREES:

    1. MAC SKORT => MAC SKORTT => MAK SCORTT => MARK SCOTT

    2. BiBi NETANYAHU => (Nibi??) "BET ON YAHOO" [Jack Ma]

    3. KEITH ROWLEY (TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO) => WREATH & COWL

    4. CHA[RLES DE]GAULLE => CHAGALL

    5. BORIS JOHNSON => BO [Ryan] ; Bathroom: W.C. => WISCONSIN

    6. OTTO VON BISMARCK => OTTO BON BISMARCK => AUTOBAHN & BISMARCK, ND

    DESSERT: TED [Already had this much, pre hint] & "?" ......I couldn't turn the hint "WILLIAM CRUISE" into anything medical. I considered "BILL TOM" and even "WILL ROBINSON"..... i.e. "DANGER WILL ROBINSON, ie. "ROBOT" but that still got me nowhere. Nearest guess: [down] or [dis] HEART -TED ???

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT,
      Dessert Hint explained:
      Dan's son William saved up his dough for a Caribbean cruise:
      Ted Danson
      Ted Williams
      Ted Cruz.

      LegoAdmitedlyHintedObscurely

      Delete
    2. I thought of Ted Williams but had never heard of Ted Danson and do not know what a TED talk is. The link to Ted Cruz seems a bit remote also. But as I was already stuck on "depressed" I never got anywhere at all.

      Delete
    3. TED talks are technological/entertainment/design-based talks put out for free on the internet, but cost $5000 to attend the conference (so said the research I just did.)

      Clearly, since I already had the TED portion, I didn't need the Ted Williams or Ted Cruz (or even Ted Danson) hints, but DID need a hint for the medical part. I had thought of MRI, or CT Scan, but somehow, never thought of X-ray. Very frustrating!

      Delete
  14. This week's official answers for the record, part 1:

    Schpuzzle Of The Week:
    Poetica Universalis (lyricism of the spheres)


    Describe Mars, Milky Way or Galaxy, in two words.
    Add a letter to the end of this description to name two means to an end that are compared to one another in a poem.
    What are this two-word description and these two means to an end?
    Note: The second “means to an end” is a more specific example of the broader, more general term mentioned in the poem.
    Answer:
    Candy brand; Candy brandy
    Ogden Nash's short poem, “Reflections on Ice-Breaking,” reads:
    Candy
    Is dandy
    But liquor
    Is quicker.

    NOTE: The CRYPTIC CROSSWORD ANSWER GRID can be found above this week's Comments Section.
    Appetizer Menu

    Lions, Dogs, Horses & Bears Appetizer:
    The 20s roar in, Crypticktockingly!

    ANSWERS:
    1. Certain pets loved primarily by S. Caesar’s costar in show(6,4)
    CALICO CATS
    L+I(mogene)COCA(who costarred with S(id)Caesar on "Your Show Of Shows" in the 1950s)inside CATS(it was a Broadway show before it was a movie)
    6. Nobleman expected to entertain king(4)
    DUKE
    DUE containing K
    9. Had a braid out of place? Yes!(3,4,3)
    BAD HAIR DAY
    HADABRAID anagram+Y & lit.
    10. Indeed, I think it’s correct(4)
    EDIT
    hidden inside deEDIThink
    11. Man left pub in terrible mood – we’ve all heard him before!(3,8)
    GUY LOMBARDO
    GUY+L+BAR inside MOOD anagram
    15. Slow working dog?(7)
    CRAMPON
    CRAMP (as a verb)+ON (something that's ON is "working")
    16. Surprise rattles characters, getting nervous(7)
    RATTLES anagram
    17. Recent disorder involving some inflammation of the stomach(7)
    ENTERIC
    RECENT anagram containing I
    19. Manage to do it?(4,3)
    double definition (I won't explain "do it"!)
    20. Never easy dancing with different partners shortly before 11 is heard?(3,5,3)
    NEVEREASY anagram containing East and West
    23. Lion’s first appearance in den(4)
    L+AIR
    24. Unfortunate sunbather, perhaps? It’s not top priority here(4,6)
    pun(An unfortunate sunbather might burn his/her back.)
    25. Imaginary creature, still intimidating at first(4)
    YET+I
    26. Get toy broken in crowd, looking for fair(6,4)
    GET TOY anagram inside PROD

    DOWN
    1. Country Bear Jamboree No. 2?(4)
    CUB+A
    2. Wife’s long, terrible day(4)
    L+DAY anagram
    3. Be inclined to go on record during trial: “There’s not much money in it!”(6,5)
    HANG+EP inside CURSE
    4. Continue to misbehave(5,2)
    double definition
    5. Snapping a visitor, unable to get one in frame(7)
    AVISITOR anagram minus I
    7. Got awfully rude? Not so on date!(10)
    RUDENOTSO anagram plus D
    8. Texts excitedly about gypsy characters(10)
    TEXTS anagram containing ROVER
    12. B-Be ugly as a horse?(5,6)
    B+LACK BEAUTY
    13. Plan for change of scenery to involve mountain climbing(10)
    SCENERY anagram containing ALP reversed
    14. Weakling wants pity – sadly, gets little attention(10)
    WANTSPITY anagram containing A
    18. Vulgar-sounding song from pirate(7)
    sounds like COARSE+AIR
    19. Creature – simple feline, say?(7)
    MEEKKAT
    sounds like MERE CAT
    21. Ruin card game with last hand(4)
    UNO containing D
    22. Raised money over the phone(4)
    sounds like BREAD

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Lego...
    This week's official answers for the record, part 2:

    MENU

    Satirical Slice:
    Mugging for cameras at the café
    An actor takes a seat at an establishment where drinks are served. He orders one. Presently, the waitress places a mug in front of his “mug...”
    Double a letter in the surname of this actor. Place the letters of a synonym of mug in front of his altered surname. Switch the first two vowels of this result to name the beverage in the actor’s mug.
    Who is this actor and what is his drink?
    Hint: The first four letters of the beverage are the last name of a satirist from the past who has the same first name as the actor.
    Answer:
    Al Pacino; cappuccino
    Hint: Al Capp is the satirist.

    Riffing Off Shortz And Scott Slices:
    Diver of skies advises us to “Spoonerize!”

    Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Scott Slices read:
    ENTREE #1
    Name two articles of clothing: a 3-letter word for what a banker with a motorcar never wears in the pouring rain, and a 5-letter word for a pair of above-the-knees hybrid britches.
    1. Double the last letter of the second word;
    2. Switch the third letter of the first word with the second letter of the second word;
    3. Move the fourth letter of the second word somewhere inside the first word.
    The result spells a talented puzzle maker, first and last names.
    Who is it? What are the two articles of clothing?
    Answer:
    Mark Scott; Mac, skort;
    MAC + SKORT--> MAC + SKORTT--> MAK + SCORTT--> MARK + SCOTT
    ENTREE #2
    Name a well-known world leader, first and last names. Spoonerize this, and you’ll get what sounds reasonably similar to a phrase that tells how a martial artist who in the mid-1990s invested heavily in a fledgling web services provider.
    Who’s the leader, and what’s the phrase?
    Answer:
    Benjamin Netanyahu; Ninja man bet on Yahoo

    Lego...

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  16. This week's official answers for the record, part 3:
    (Riffing Off Shortz And Scott Slices, continued)

    ENTREE #3
    Name a not-so-well-known world leader, first and last names. The name of the republic of which this leader is prime minister contains multiple words. Spoonerize this, forming two parts. Ignore a long-E sound at the end of the second part. The two parts sound like two words for things that can be worn on the head.
    Who’s the leader, and what are the two things worn on the head?
    Answer:
    Keith Rowley (prime minister of Trinidad and Tobago); Wreath, cowl
    ENTREE #4
    Name a well-known past world leader, full name. Remove six consecutive letters from the interior of this name, leaving what sounds like the last name of an artist whose nationality was the same as the world leader.
    Who are this leader and artist?
    Answer:
    Charles de Gaulle; Marc Chagall
    CHARLESDEGAULLE - RLESDE = CHA+GAULLE
    ENTREE #5
    Name a well-known world leader, first and last names. The first two letters in the name spell the nickname of the winningest men’s basketball coach in the history of his Big Ten school. Change the third and sixth letters of the name, respectively, to the letters in a abbreviated synonym of “bathroom” to spell what sounds like the Big Ten school where the coach was a winner.
    Who is this world leader?
    Who is the coach and what was his school?
    Answer:
    Boris Johnson; Bo (Ryan), Wisconsin (BO+WIS+COHNSON)
    ENTREE #6
    Name a well-known 19th-century world leader, first and last names, 15 total letters.
    Replace the fifth letter in the name with a duplicate of the eighth letter. The first seven letters spell what sounds like the name of a modern expressway in the land of this leader. The remaining letters spell a U.S. state capital.
    Who’s the leader? What’s the expressway? What is the capital?
    Answer:
    Otto von Bismarck; Autobahn, Bismarck (North Dakota) (OTTO+BON+BISMARCK)

    Dessert Menu

    Produce Section Dessert:
    “All this ‘clinical talk’ makes me blue”
    Name a word for a kind of talk.
    Place it at the end of a medical procedure to form what sounds like a synonym of “blue.”
    What are this procedure and synonym?
    Hint: The word for the “kind of talk” is an an acronym.
    Answer:
    X-Ray; X-Rated (X-Ray + Ted)
    Hint: The "TED" in "TED talks" stands for Technology, Entertainment and Design.

    Lego...

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  17. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

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  18. cranberry --

    Look up Don Marquis and you'll get the answer to my puzzle. It's a silly fun play on words. And it comes from what I consider one of the two best books in the American language (The other is the "Sot-Weed Factor by John Barth,)

    When my pals and I were playing around with cryptics we didn't always follow the construction rules -- but we had a lot of fun. It was more an in-house thing. Alas, most of them have passed on and are playing with Aracauria and Bunthorne
    now..

    D.E.

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  19. I don’t know the question, but sex is definitely the answer. Hey, i am looking for an online sexual partner ;) Click on my boobs if you are interested (. )( .)

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