Friday, January 31, 2020

Pay-back for a ref under siege! Punctuation & Judy turns tragic; Restraining one’s room to roam; Bountifully billowing sales... promo; “It was 19 years ago today...” Alphabetical “imbibery” Transporting lowercase letters across state lines!

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Punctuation & Judy turns tragic

Take the title of a play that is a comedy. 
Delete a punctuation mark and the two letters that immediately follow it. 
Rearrange the letters to the right of this deletion. 
The result sounds like the title of a tragedy. 
What is the title of this comedy?
What is the title of the tragedy? 


Appetizer Menu

Free Falling Appetizer:
Restraining one’s room to roam

Note: We are privileged this week to present on Puzzleria! a nifty puzzle created by Mark Scott of Seattle, known to many of us also by his blog screen name, skydiveboy. 
Mark created a great puzzle involving spoonerization that Puzzlemaster Will Shortz used last  month as “The Puzzle” on the December 29th edition of NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. 
Mark’s “Restraining one’s room to roam” puzzle also involves a spoonerism. 
Enjoy!

Switch the initial sounds of (that is, spoonerize) a two-word phrase for something that restricts the roaming range of certain creatures. 
Switch the order of the resulting words to form what sounds like a two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of various vehicles. 
What are these two phrases?

Common Law Appetizer:
Transporting lowercase letters across state lines! 

A city and its state share a string of consecutive letters in common. 
Remove these common letters from each, leaving a means of transport and what it once perhaps transported. 
What are this city and state?


MENU

Market Share Slice:
Bountifully billowing sales... promo

Name a type of sales promotion that marketers use, in two words. 
Rearrange the combined letters to form two other words marketers use, often in conjunction with photographs. 
What is this type of promotion? What two words do marketers often use along with photographs.

Super Slice:
It was 19 years ago today...

On January 28, 2001 the rock band Aerosmith performed during the halftime show at the Super Bowl in Tampa, Florida.
It is now nineteen years later. 
Aerosmith will not be performing at this year’s Super Bowl, February 2 in Miami, Florida. But the name of someone related to a member of the band will be ubiquitously visible. 
Who is this someone?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Pay-back for a ref under siege!

Will Shortz’s January 26th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Write down the letter C. Beneath that write ENT. And beneath that write a G. What profession do these letters represent? 
Here’s a hint: It’s a two-word phrase – 10 letters in the first word, 5 letters in the second.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Write down the letters ER. Beneath that write LA. What profession do these letters represent?
Here’s a hint: An honest practitioner of the profession deals with “threads,” while a shady practitioner of the profession deals with “bread.”
ENTREE #2
Write down the letters CO. Beneath that write OFFERS. What money-saving methods do these letters represent, in two words?
Here’s a hint: The money-saving methods the letters represent may be printable or clippable.
(Speaking of money, if you remove one of the two O’s, what you wrote is a two-tiered spelling of COFFERS, places to put money.)
ENTREE #3
Write down the word WOOD. Beneath that write G. And beneath that write the word NOR. What profession/title and surname do these letters represent? 
Here’s a hint: The person with the title and surname was elected to public office and served a four-year term at age 34. Forty years later, at age 74 he was elected to the same public office and served another four-year term!
ENTREE #4
Write down the letter S. Above that write LASS. These letters represent a word that Annie Oakley and other such cowgals who competed in the rodeo were sometimes called, especially during certain events. 
What is it these buckskin-clad lasses were at times called as they vied for a rodeo trophy?
Here’s a hint: An apostrophe comes into play during the solving.
ENTREE #5
The six mini-puzzles below, A through F, correspond to the six graphic representations in the adjoining image below.
Each mini-puzzle contains three clues. Solve for the first two clues, then replace the clues with your answers. Then, taking into account the relative positions of the answers (one above the other in each case), solve for the third clue. The number in parentheses at the end of each clue indicates the number of letters in that clue’s answer.  
A. 
kiss (4)
monogram of  “I’m Sorry” singer (2)
muzzle-loading firearm (11)
B. 
Santa syllable (2)
nature abhoree (6)
dirt sucker (6, 6)
C. 
sort, type (4) 
Bubba’s successor (1)
child prodigy (10) 
D. 
word following drum or dinner (4)
Bonn-born composer (9)
Berry-penned title (4, 4, 9)
E. 
platter that is played (4)
platters that are played (5)
advertising slogan urging younger generations to give “groovy” recordings a listen (8, 5)
F.  
what “Lima” stands for (1)
word in a short Holly title (3)
1980’s “hair band” (8)
ENTREE #6
Write down a compound word for particular time periods. 
Place the first compound part above the second part. Switch the first letters of the two parts. That is, spoonerize them.
Given their positioning, these words represent a two-word phrase that describes events that occurred on March 31, 1973 in San Diego and on June 9, 1978 in Las Vegas. 
What is this two-word phrase? 
Here’s a hint: The two-word phrase has 6 letters in the first word and 6 letters in the second word. 


Dessert Menu

Thirst For Juice-tice Dessert:
Alphabetical “imbibery” 

The second word in the name of a two-word drink sounds like a letter of the alphabet. Replace the word with the letter and move it to the beginning. 
Divide the result into two words. 
Use:
1. the first word twice, 
2. the second word once, 
3. a rhyme of the second word once, and
4. a synonym of “precipitous” once. 
Use those five words to fill in the five blanks in this warning: 
“Don't _____ this drink ___ ____ lest it become ___ ______.” 
What is this drink? 
What is the completed sentence?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

51 comments:

  1. No comments yet? I'll fix that!
    Happy Super Bowl Eve Eve, everybody!
    I've been doing some Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation for my hematoma lately(well, not so much compression, as we don't have any bandages that would help the situation). We didn't eat out tonight, as Bryan and Renae et al were babysitting. So we got some food from Arby's. I highly recommend their new white cheddar mac'n'cheese. After that, I listened to Ask Me Another and did this week's Prize Crossword, compiled by Tramp. The very last clue had to do with cricket, which occasionally comes up in these puzzles, and somehow I manage to figure out clues like that even though I know nothing about the sport. Helps to look up answers you're not 100% sure about. Anyway, on to this week's P!
    The only puzzles I could not get as of yet are SDB's spoonerism puzzle(sorry, Mark), and the two puzzles that followed. Last night I spent a long time looking up cities and states that looked like they might resemble a transport and what might be transported, but to no avail. By contrast, I definitely enjoyed all of the Entrees, even though I had to look up those dates in the last one to get it. I know I can expect hints for the others, but then I also know SDB isn't the type to supply hints for his own work. So I'm most likely screwed with that one. But in case SDB changes his mind(and I won't hold my breath), I will keep checking back in for hints to all of them. I know Lego won't let me down. Good luck to all on the blog, and keep the comments coming!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I've got many, but not all.

    Might I add to the riffs? Some are lame, some less so, this is only 45 minutes distracted by MST 3000.

    1. n¢o
    2. ical
    3. deathlife
    4.
    cl
    leaf
    5. ablapignket
    6. srevo
    7. ɔɐʞǝ
    8. act_o_
    9. b.....e.....d
    10.
    stp
    s e
    ret
    11. reosh
    12. IDEA
    13. x and x
    14. en + da
    15. nat ion
    16.
    |
    |
    |
    |
    17. lookyouleap
    18. facedlie
    19. fence

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. one more for this weekend:
      20. tmso

      Delete
    2. Thanks for dropping by and gracing us with your NON-LAME riffs, eco. They are clever. I have solved most of them but not all, just like I do with your BONUS PUZZLES on Blaine's blog. If you didn't have a day job, you could crank out a heckuva puzzle blog.
      I shall sleep on your riffs that are stumping me.

      Lego
      Barrel

      Delete
    3. and one more:
      21. erf erb

      improvements on last night's haste:
      2. toe
      10.
      s....t....p
      s.........e
      r....e....t
      (graphics are hard in text, think of the . as blank spaces. still isn't right)
      20. ti sh

      Delete
    4. Actually, I have solved only 3. 4. 5. 7. 12, 15, 17, 18, 19 and, maybe, 6 and 8.
      The "improvements" just brought my puzzlement into clearer focus!

      LegoWhoSuddenlyHasAHankerin'ForSome
      Eggs
      Easy

      Delete
    5. I just now posted the following puzzle on Blaine's blog. I reprint it here, with permission (and persimmons):
      A Puzzle:
      Take a screen name that appears on Blaine's Blog and, from time to time, on Puzzleria! Rearrange its letters to form two words:
      1. A plural noun, and
      2. What kind of metrical foot this noun would be classified as if it appeared in a poem.
      Hint: The answers to 1. and 2. are in alphabetical order.


      LegoWhoDinesOnPricklyPearsForDessert

      Delete
  3. I just now came up with AN answer for SDB's appetizer. I like the second phrase more than the first phrase, however, so it could well be wrong.

    Also have an answer for the Common Law Slice, although (in reverse), I like the first word way better than the second word.

    Have 'for sure' answers for the Market Share slice, the Super slice, Entree #3, and the Dessert, but not doing so well everywhere else.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT: I am sure you did solve it.

      Delete
    2. Thanks, SDB, but I'm still not sure....

      Delete
    3. What mainly worries me at the moment, sdb, is that the spoonerizing gave an exact result, not a 'sounds like.'

      Delete
    4. VT:
      "sounds like" was put in by Lego, not me. I just expect people to either know what a Spoonerism is, or look it up. I am certain you have solved it. Good job.

      Delete
    5. The difficult part wasn't the spoonerizing, though, it's the trying to come up with WHAT is doing the restricting!

      Delete
    6. A few words about spoonerisms:
      Merriam Webster defines "spoonerism" as:
      a transposition of usually initial sounds of two or more words (as in tons of soil for sons of toil).
      Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 4th Edition defines "spoonerism" as:
      an unintentional interchange of sounds, usually initial sounds, in two or more words, for example, “a well-boiled icicle” for “a well-oiled bicycle.”
      According to Wikipedia, A Mr. Robert Seton, once a student of the Reverend William Spooner, admitted that the good reverend
      made, to Seton's knowledge, only one "Spoonerism" in his life, in 1879, when he stood in the pulpit and announced the hymn: "Kinkering Kongs their Titles Take." Spooner himself claimed that "The Kinquering Kongs Their Titles Take" (in reference to a hymn) was his sole spoonerism.
      But skydiveboy is correct: Usually a spoonerism switches initial sounds or letters.
      A few words about the puzzle:
      Spoonerizing "bowl of salad" spells "sowl of balad."
      Spoonerizing "bowl of salad" sounds like "soul of ballad."
      That is why used "sounds like" in the text of the puzzle.
      If we were spoonerizing "pack of lies" to "lack of pies," I would have not used "sounds like."
      I would have written something like:
      "Switch the initial sounds (or letters) of the first and third words of a three-word phrase for the content of recent State of the Union addresses. The result will spell a phrase indicating a dearth of certain pastries."
      Note: It wouldn't be incorrect to substitute "sounds like" for "spell," but using "spell" makes the puzzle more easily solvable. It gives the solver more information.

      LegoWhoWillNowSitBackAndRestASpell

      Delete
  4. Have laboriously worked out the rest of the Entrees, eXCEPT for #1, 4 and 5F.

    Have other folks gotten the Schpuzzle already?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, Entree #1 wasn't hard after all.

      Delete
    2. "Have laboriously worked out the rest of the Entrees, except for #1, 4 and 5F..."
      I hope, VT, that it was a labor of love rather than a labor of tedium!

      LegoNotes:JustAs"NoGutsNoGlory"SoToo"NoLaboriousNoGlorious"

      Delete
    3. Well, it's fun when one finally solves it. While researching and looking around, awhile nothing works out, I can't say, in all honesty, that THAT is fun!

      Delete
  5. Saturday Hints:

    Schpuzzle:
    In northern climes, in October on ice rinks you may see a puck or two.

    FFA:
    The two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of certain creatures might be invisible. The two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of various vehicles conjures images of lighthouses.

    CLA:
    The means of transport was measured not in cubic feet but in cubic cubits.

    Super Slice:
    Who is this someone? A female actress.
    Market Share Slice:
    The two words do marketers use with photographs are antonyms.

    ROSS:
    ENTREE #1
    The profession is similar, in one way, with that of a caterer.
    ENTREE #2
    The key word in solving this puzzle often follows the word "Once..."
    ENTREE #3
    "Take me home, country roads..."
    ENTREE #4
    Stanley and Helen on an old sit-com
    ENTREE #5
    A.
    The muzzle-loading firearm is a compound word. The first part is not a good word to associate with firearms!
    B.
    Perhaps a German child prodigy?
    C.
    This puzzle might well have substituted "beavers' project (3)" for "nature abhoree (6)"
    D.
    "...and tell Tchaikovsky the news."
    E.
    The platter(s)? Usually black and 78, 45 and 33.3333
    F.
    "OscarHotel _ _ _ )" by BravoUniformDeltaDeltaYankee HotelOscarLimaLimaYankee
    ENTREE #6
    1,209,600 seconds

    Thirst For Juice-tice Dessert:
    "Why not have a spot? It's on the cart."

    LegoPouringOutSippableHints

    ReplyDelete
  6. I think I've accidentally stumbled upon the answer to SDB's puzzle!

    ReplyDelete
  7. If my answer to the transport puzzle is correct(and I doubt it), what's being transported is only one out of many, many, many different "things". Further clarification may be necessary.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What is being transported is one of many things, Perhaps many many. But many many many may be stretching it a bit!
      It is what most of us consider an ancient means of transport. What is being transported is a living creature. The word I am calling it is capitalized and six letters long. It is often followed by a three-letter lowercase noun that names the creature more generally.

      LegoWhoSaysThatIfYouTurnYourTelevisionOnThisEveningYouMayWellSeeOnYourScreenTwentyTwoOfTheLowerCaseVersionsOfTheSixLetterCreatureThatWasOncePerhapsTransported

      Delete
  8. Late last (Saturday) evening, our friend ron over on Blaine's blog posted a wonderful and interesting comment regarding today's date and palindromes. I am reprinting it here for those of you who may not have seen it:
    Tomorrow’s date will be written as an eight-digit palindrome around the world, the first time this has happened in 900 years.

    The coincidence is rare because countries use differing conventions. February 2, 2020, is a palindrome whether expressed as day/month/year (02/02/2020), month/day/year (02/02/2020), or year/month/day (2020/02/02).

    This happened last on November 11, 1111, and it won’t happen again until March 3, 3030.

    02/01/2020 UPDATE: A number of readers have pointed out that 12/12/2121 works fine too, and it’s barely more than a century away.


    LegoWhoNotesThatronAlwaysSeemsToDigUpInterestingStuffLikeThisAndThanksHimForDoingSo(AndWhoHopesronIsOkayWithMyReprintingItHereOnOurBlog)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Sunday clues to some additional riffs

    1. n¢o → Standard Fear Leader Proclamation
    2. toeMight come through your own two lips
    3. deathlife → SDB belief
    4. cl
    leaf → there's a reason it's #4
    5. ablapignket → Vegetarians, Jews, and Muslims won't go for this
    6. srevo → Possible, but unlikely result ending for #5 or #7
    7. ɔɐʞǝ → Pineapple
    8. act_o_ → Pretty unwatchable
    9. b.....e.....d → Sort of related to Undercover Agent
    10.
    s....t....p
    s.........e
    r....e....t → An opportunity to pontificate?
    11. reosh → STRAP cannot condone.
    12. IDEA → Not many of these coming out of Washington DC these days
    13. x and x → "If I've clued you once..."
    14. en + da → I swear I didn't know about today's on-air puzzle
    15. nat ion → Result of standard Fear Leader Proclamation
    16.
    |
    |
    |
    | → Where many would like to see the Fear Leader
    17. lookyouleap → Wise words to SDB, or maybe not
    18. facedlieAnother standard Fear Leader Proclamation
    19. fenceYou might also let yourself be braced
    20 tmso or ti sh → I think happens around 5 PM today
    21. erf erb → You don't want one of these

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, eco, for these hints. It helped me chip away at a few more. I now have more than half.

      LegoWhoDoesNotKnowTheAnswerTo#11ButWhoNeverthelessPresumesToIntroduceTheFollowingRiffOffs:GSGE>Or,MoreSubtley,STUN

      Delete
    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    3. 1.
      KNEE
      SLICED
      2. Ay
      3. 6 25¢
      4. DEPENDECLARATIONOFDENCE
      5.
      N
      E
      T
      H
      G
      I
      A
      R
      T
      S FLY
      6.
      E
      C
      N
      O
      7:15PM
      7. AFF4AIRS
      8.
      G
      NMENT
      9.
      GLASS
      PHEASANT
      10.
      BEER LEMONADE TEA R
      THE HOUSE
      11.
      BAD ACTOR
      RYE
      12. AMABALA
      13. ALEVEL
      Just a few Riff-Offs of my own. Hope you enjoy them.


      Delete
    4. I have solved two-thirds of eco's riffs and 60% of cranberry's riffs.

      LegoWhoDeclares"Hey!That'sOverA600BattingAverage!NotBad!"

      Delete
    5. Three more:
      14. THLACKE
      15.
      TRUMP THINKS HE'S
      POLICE
      16.
      'SDAY
      FO

      Delete
    6. Make that four...
      17. BREA&KING

      Delete
    7. Wouldja believe one more?
      18. ELPPA

      Delete
    8. cranberry,
      I solved #16. I'm so close to solving #18 that I can almost taste it!

      LegoFlummoxed

      Delete
    9. Would that be anything like YGOLOHCYSP?

      Delete
  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  11. SCHPUZZLE: MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM => MARE => MIDSUMMER NIGHTMARE

    FREEFALL APPETIZER: LARGE CHOW (dog) => LOW CHARGE [on electric cars] ; SMART COLLAR => CART SMOLLAR => SMALLER CART ?? [I know these are both wrong, since they don't go with the hint. I tried "VIRTUAL FENCE" but got nowhere with it.]

    COMMON LAW SLICE: NEWARK, NEW JERSEY => ARK & JERSEY (cow)

    MARKET SHARE SLICE: REBATE OFFER => BEFORE, AFTER [Did this backwards]

    SUPER SLICE: LIV TYLER (Super Bowl LIV)

    ENTREES:

    1. LA[UNDER]ER

    2. CO[UPON] OFFERS

    3. G[OVER]NOR [UNDER]WOOD

    4. LASS[OVER] S ?????

    5. A. BL[UNDER]BUSS [Good thing I learned the second word here last week!]
    B. HO[OVER] VACUUM or DAM per the hint
    C. W[UNDER]KIND
    D. ROLL [OVER] BEETHOVEN
    E. DISC[OVER] DISCS
    F. L[OVER]BOY

    6. FORTNIGHTS => NORT[ON] FIGHTS

    DESSERT: OOLONG TEA => TOOLONG => TOO & LONG => 1. TOO, TOO 2. LONG 3. STRONG 4. STEEP => Don't STEEP this drink TOO LONG, lest it become TOO STRONG.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT:
      I thought you had solved it, but I was wrong. You did get 2 of the words though. More later.

      Delete
    2. Yeah, I see from geo's answer below, that 'dog and 'fence' were the answer. However, I DO love my "Low Charge" answer anyway.

      Delete
    3. After reading the "lighthouse" hint, I was really hoping to make BARRIER REEF work somehow.

      Delete
    4. VT: I also liked your LARGE CHOW / LOW CHARGE answer.

      Delete
  12. A Midsummer Night's Dream > A Midsummer Nightmare
    LA(UNDER)ER
    Don't STEEP OOLONG TEA TOO LONG les it become TOO STRONG.

    ReplyDelete
  13. Schpuzzle: ????
    Misunderstood the question to relate to only the letters after the apostrophe, not all the remaining letters (including those before). But I had never heard of the film, so couldn't have gotten it anyway.

    Free-Falling Appetizer: DOG FENCE => FOG DENCE => DENSE FOG (post-Sat-hint)

    Common Law Appetizer: NEWARK, NEW JERSEY – NEW => ARK, JERSEY (breed of cattle)
    Alternate: NEW DURHAM, NH – NEW => DURHAM (boat), HAMPSHIRE (breed of sheep or pig)

    Market Share Slice: ????
    Got stuck on SAIL/SALE from the picture, so got nowhere.

    Super Slice: KOBE BRYANT (?) - didn't fit with hint. Had never heard of Liv Tyler, and had no idea who could be related to anyone in Aerosmith (also unfamiliar).

    Entrées
    #1: LA (under) ER => LAUNDERER
    #2: CO (upon) OFFERS => COUPON OFFERS
    #3: G (under) WOOD; (over) NOR => (Grant) UNDERWOOD GOVERNOR
    #4: LASS (o'er) S => LASSOERS
    #5 A: BL (Brenda Lee) (under) BUSS => BLUNDERBUSS
    B: HO (over) VACUUM => HOOVER VACUUM
    C: W (under) KIND => WUNDERKIND
    D: ROLL (over) BEETHOVEN => ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN
    E: DISC (over) DISCS => DISCOVER DISCS
    F: L (over) BOY => LOVERBOY (never heard of the band)
    #6: FORT (on) NIGHTS => NORTON FIGHTS

    Dessert: OOLONG TEA => TOO LONG => STEEP, TOO LONG, TOO STRONG


    Also got most of Eco's and cranberry's bonus puzzles.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I had meant to comment a bit earlier, when I read your Schpuzzle comment, that I, TOO, had misunderstood the directions until just last night, when suddenly I realized (having already put down Midsummer NIght's Dream, but 'ream' arranged any way one did it, didn't make sense).....that Lego meant for us to use ALL the letters, not just the ones after the apostrophe deletion.

      Delete
  14. My riffs:

    1. n¢o → in no cent First one I thought of, I hope you got stuck on non-commissioned officer.
    2. toeTip toe Through the two lips.
    3. deathlife → Life after death Easy.
    4.
    cl
    leaf → Cloverleaf Also easy.
    5. ablapignket → Pig in a blanket Even easier
    6. srevo → Leftovers
    7. ɔɐʞǝ → Upside down cake
    8. act_o_ → Missing in action
    9. b.....e.....d → Bedspread
    10.
    s....t....p
    s.........e
    r....e....t → St Peters Square My favorite, no surprise there.
    11. reosh → Horseplay
    12. IDEA → Capital ideal
    13. x and x → Time and time again
    14. en + da → Addenda
    15. nat ion → Divided nation
    16.
    |
    |
    |
    | → line up
    17. lookyouleap → Look before you leap
    18. facedlieBold faced lie
    19. fencechain link fence
    20 tmso or ti sh → half time show
    21. erf erb → f end er b end er
    22. reenigne → reverse engineer

    ReplyDelete
  15. First my riffs:
    1. SLICED BALONEY(below knee)
    2. ABYSMALLY(A by small Y)
    3. QUARTER AFTER SIX
    4. DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE
    5. STRAIGHTEN UP AND FLY RIGHT
    6. ONCE UPON A TIME(up on)
    7. FOREIGN AFFAIRS(four in AFFAIRS)
    8. GOVERNMENT(G over NMENT)
    9. PHEASANT UNDER GLASS
    10. DRINKS ARE ON THE HOUSE(R for are)
    11. HAM ON RYE
    12. THE TIDE IS TURNING(or TURNING THE TIDE)
    13. ALL ABOUT EVE
    14. THE HOUSING SHORTAGE
    15. TRUMP THINKS HE'S ABOVE THE LAW
    16. FOUNDER'S DAY(FO under 'SDAY)
    17. BREAKING AND ENTERING
    18. APPLE TURNOVER
    And of course, REVERSE PSYCHOLOGY.
    Schpuzzle
    A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM, A MIDSUMMER NIGHTMARE
    Appetizer Menu
    skydiveboy's Puzzle
    DOG FENCE, DENSE FOG(Good one, SDB!)
    Common Law Appetizer
    NEWARK, NEW JERSEY(ARK, JERSEY cows)
    Menu
    Market Share Slice
    REBATE OFFER, BEFORE, AFTER
    Entrees
    1. LAUNDERER(under)
    2. COUPON OFFERS(upon)
    3. GOVERNOR UNDERWOOD(over, under, his first name is Grant)
    4. LASSOERS(o'er)
    5. A. BLUNDERBUSS(BL for Brenda Lee under BUSS)
    B. HOOVER VACUUM(over)
    C. WUNDERKIND(George W. Bush under KIND)
    D. ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN(over)
    E. DISCOVER DISCS(over)
    F. LOVERBOY(L over BOY)
    6. NORTON FIGHTS(NORT on FIGHTS), FORTNIGHTS
    Dessert
    OOLONG TEA, STEEP, TOO LONG, TOO STRONG
    Gotta go! I'm missing The Masked Singer!-pjb

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  16. Congratulations to geofan and PJB for solving my puzzle, and also VT, who came very close to solving it. Congrats to anyone else who did too.

    Interestingly, at least to me anyway, I came up with the puzzle on the spur of the moment during a phone conversation with Lego. I really don't know how it came to me so quickly and easily, seemingly without any thought at all. At that moment I didn't think it worthwhile as a puzzle. I had to look at it again after Lego said he would like to use it to see that it might be okay. Thanks Lego.

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  17. (Sorry about the tardiness of these official answers)

    This week's official answers for the record, part 1:

    Schpuzzle Of The Week:
    Punctuation & Judy turns tragic

    Take the title of a play that is a comedy.
    Delete a punctuation mark and the two letters that immediately follow it.
    Rearrange the letters to the right of this deletion.
    The result sounds like the title of a tragedy.
    What is the title of this comedy?
    What is the title of the tragedy?
    Answer:
    "A Midsummer Night's Dream"; "A Midsummer Nightmare"

    Appetizer Menu

    Free Falling Appetizer:
    Restraining one’s room to roam

    Spoonerize a two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of certain creatures. Switch the order of the resulting words to form a two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of various vehicles. What are these two phrases?
    Answer:
    Dog fence; Dense fog

    Common Law Appetizer:
    Transporting lowercase letters across state lines!

    A city and its state share a string of consecutive letters in common. Remove these common letters from each, leaving a means of transport and what it once perhaps transported.
    What are this city and state?
    Answer:
    Newark, New Jersey; Noah's ARK perhaps transported a JERSEY (cow)


    MENU

    Super Slice:
    It was 19 years ago today...

    On January 28, 2001 the rock band Aerosmith played during the halftime show at the Super Bowl in Tampa, Florida.
    Nineteen years later, Aerosmith will not be performing at this year’s Super Bowl, February 2 in Miami, Florida. But the name of someone related to a member of the band will be ubiquitously visible.
    Who is this someone?
    Answer:
    Liv Tyler, the daughter of Aerosmith lead singer Steven Tyler. Her first name is the Roman numeral of this year's Super Bowl LIV (54).

    Lego...

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  18. This week's official answers for the record, part 2:

    Market Share Slice:
    Bountifully billowing sales... promo

    Name a type of sales promotion that marketers use, in two words.
    Rearrange the combined letters to form two other words marketers use in conjunction with photographs.
    What is this type of promotion?
    What two words do marketers use with photographs.
    Answer:
    Rebate offer; before, after

    Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
    Pay-back for a ref under siege!

    Will Shortz’s January 26th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
    Write down the letter C. Beneath that write ENT. And beneath that write a G. What profession do these letters represent?
    Here’s a hint: It’s a two-word phrase – 10 letters in the first word, 5 letters in the second.
    Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
    ENTREE #1
    Write down the letters ER. Beneath that write LA. What profession do these letters represent?
    Here’s a hint: An honest practitioner of the profession deals with “threads,” while a shady practitioner of the profession deals with “bread.”
    Answer:
    Launderer (of clothers or, more shadily, of cash)
    ENTREE #2
    Write down the letters CO. Beneath that write OFFERS. What money-saving methods do these letters represent, in two words?
    Here’s a hint: The money-saving methods the letters represent may be printable or clippable.
    (Speaking of money, if you remove one of the two O’s, what you wrote is a two-tiered spelling of https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/coffer COFFERS, places to put money.)
    Answer:
    Coupon offers; CO UPON OFFERS (Coupons that are offered may be printable from online sites or clippable from print media.)
    ENTREE #3
    Write down the word WOOD. Beneath that write G. And beneath that write the word NOR. What profession/title and surname do these letters represent?
    Here’s a hint: The person with the title and surname was elected to public office and served a four-year term at age 34. At age 74 he was elected to the same public office and served a four-year term!
    Answer:
    Governor (Cecil) Underwood (G OVER NOR UNDER WOOD)
    ENTREE #4
    Write down the letter S. Above that write LASS. These letters represent a word that Annie Oakley and other such cowgals in the rodeo are sometimes called, especially during the calf-roping competition.
    What is it these buckskin-clad lasses are called as ther vie for a calf-roping TROPHY?
    Here’s a hint: An aposTROPHE comes into play during the solving.
    Answer:
    Lassoers; LASS O'ER S

    Lego...

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  19. This week's official answers for the record, part 3:

    ENTREE #5
    The six mini-puzzles below, A through F, correspond to the six grapic representations in the adjoining image.
    Each mini-puzzle contains three clues. Solve for the first two clues, then replace the clues with your answers. Then, taking into account the relative positions of the answers (one above the other in each case), solve for the third clue. The number in parentheses at the end of each clue indicates the number of letters in that clue’s answer.
    A.
    kiss (4)
    monogram of “I’m Sorry” singer (2)
    muzzle-loading firearm (11)
    B.
    sort, type (4)
    Bubba’s successor (1)
    child prodigy (10)
    C.
    Santa syllable (2)
    nature abhoree (6)
    dirt sucker (6, 6)
    D.
    word following drum or dinner (4)
    Bonn-born composer (9)
    Berry-penned title (4, 4, 9)
    E.
    platter that is played (4)
    platters that are played (5)
    advertising slogan urging younger generations to give “groovy” recordings a listen (8, 5)
    F.
    what “Lima” stands for (1)
    word in a short Holly title (3)
    1980’s “hair group” (8)
    Answer:
    A.
    kiss (4) BUSS
    monogram of “I’m Sorry” singer (2) BL
    muzzle-loading firearm (11) BLUNDERBUSS
    BL UNDER BUSS = BLUNDERBUSS
    B.
    sort, type (4) KIND
    Bubba’s successor (1) W
    child prodigy (10) WUNDERKIND
    W UNDER KIND = WUNDERKIND
    C.
    Santa syllable (2) HO
    nature abhoree (6) VACUUM
    dirt sucker (6, 6) HOOVER VACUUM
    HO OVER VACUUM = HOOVER VACUUM
    D.
    word following drum or dinner (4) ROLL
    Bonn-born composer (9) BEETHOVEN
    Berry-penned title (4, 4, 9) ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN
    ROLL OVER BEETHOVEN
    E.
    platter that is played (4) DISC
    platters that are played (5) VINYL
    advertising slogan urging younger generations to give “groovy” recordings a listen (8, 5) DISCOVER VINYL
    DISC OVER VINYL = DISCOVER VINYL
    F.
    what “Lima” stands for (1) L
    word in a short Holly title (3) BOY
    1980’s “hair group” (8) LOVERBOY
    L OVER BOY = LOVERBOY
    ENTREE #6
    Write down a compound word for particular time periods. Place the first compound part above the second part. Switch the first letters of the two parts. Given their positioning, these words represent a two-word phrase that describes events that occured March 31, 1973 in San Diego and June 9, 1978 in Las Vegas.
    What is this two-word phrase?
    Here’s a hint: The two-word phrase has 6 letters in the first word, 5 letters in the second.
    Answer:
    Fortnights; Nort (on) Fights

    Dessert Menu

    Thirst For Juice-tice Dessert:
    Alphabetical “imbibery”

    The second word in the name of a two-word drink sounds like a letter of the alphabet. Replace the word with the letter and move it to the beginning.
    Divide the result into two words.
    Use:
    1. the first word twice,
    2. the second word once,
    3. a rhyme of the second word once, and
    4. a synonym of “precipitous” once...
    to fill in the five blanks in this warning:
    “Don't _____ this drink ___ ____ lest it become ___ ______.”
    What is this drink?
    What is the completed sentence?
    Answer:
    Oolong tea; (oolong t -->too long -->too strong)
    "Don't steep this drink too long lest it become too strong."

    Lego!

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  20. Wow! this is Amazing! Do you know your hidden name meaning ? Click here to find your hidden name meaning

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