Friday, April 10, 2020

Periodical on the boardroom table; Industrial de-evolution; Plano, Texas! Gherkinsburg, Delaware! International Explorers browse the World Wide...; “mispelled,” not misspelled, is “misspelled”;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“mispelled,” not misspelled, is “misspelled”

Name a composer of music. 
Change one-third of the letters in the composer’s first name to form a word related to DNA (short for deoxyribonucleic acid, the hereditary material in humans and almost all other organisms). 
The composer’s last name is a verb which, if not applied to itself, might sound like an informal shorter term for a branch of science that is also related to DNA. 
Who is this composer?


Appetizer Menu

Adventuresome Appetizer:
International Explorers browse the World Wide...


Think of a famous explorer of the past. Using Scrabble tiles, or similar letter pieces, spell the one-word title of the book he wrote describing his most famous adventure. 
Then switch the positions of the second and third letters with each other. 
Now rotate the tiles in the second and last positions 90 degrees in order to discover the last name of another famous explorer of the past who is also known for exploring the same continent.
Can you name these two well known explorers?


MENU

Subscription Slice:
Periodical on the boardroom table

Name a synonym of “saw” that also spells the title of a magazine. 
Adding three letters to the end of the title spells the name of a business whose employees are likely to read the magazine. 
Rearrange the letters you added to name a city, for short, that is home to many of these businesses.
What are this magazine title, business and city? 

Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices:
Plano, Texas! Gherkinsburg, Delaware!

Will Shortz’s April 5th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Bruce Campbell of Kansas City, Missouri, reads:
Think of a well-known U.S. city. Its population is over a quarter of a million. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will sound like a well-known brand name. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Think of a U.S. town immortalized in the title of a song by a great American composer. 
The first syllable of the town’s name, plus the first syllable of the name of the northernmost city in the continental U.S. with a population of more than 50,000, will form well-known brand name... as well as the last name of a puzzle-maker. 
Who is this puzzle-maker?
Hint: The first name of the founder of the immortalized U.S. town is Job. This town is situated in one of the 13 original colonies.
ENTREE #2
Think of a well-known U.S. coastal-state city. Its population is over a quarter of a million. 
Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first two syllables of the name of its state will sound like a city in another coastal state. 
The city in this second coastal state is one of five in existence that dubs itself as the “Horse Capital of the World.” 
What are these two coastal-state cities?
ENTREE #3
Think of a well-known U.S. city. Its population is over a quarter of a million. The first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will spell a body part that can be “cerebral.”
What is the state? What is the body part?
Hint: The first two syllables of the city’s name are non-English word for “body.”
ENTREE #4
Think of a capital city somewhere in the world. Its population is counted in millions. 
Add a “g” to the end of the first syllable of the city’s name. If you say this new syllable, followed by the first syllable of the capital’s country, it will sound like an 87-year-old character that some in the motion picture business have dubbed “the Eighth Wonder of the World.” 
What is the capital city? Who is “the Eighth Wonder of the World?”
ENTREE #5
Think of a Midwestern U.S. city associated with aviation. Its population is about a seventh of a million. 
Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will sound like the title of a well-known Harry Belafonte song. 
What are this city and song?
ENTREE #6
Think of a well-known Pacific Northwest U.S. city. Its population is over 150,000. 
Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will sound like a coin-or-credit-card-operated business that caters only to Pacificas, Siennas, Odysseys, Sedonas, VW buses, etc. 
What are this city and business?
ENTREE #7
Think of a well-known city in the Middle East. Its population is about four million. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its country will sound like the first two words in song titles by Peter Frampton, The Beatles and Culture Club. 
What is the city? What are the three song titles?


Dessert Menu

Demisery Dessert:
Industrial de-evolution 

By the mid-20th-century a once-booming industry in a U.S. state, and in neighboring states, had virtually ended. 
One reason for this can be found by adding one letter to the name of the state and dividing the result in two. What is the state and what contributed to this industry’s demise? 


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.



61 comments:

  1. I think I've solved the Schpuzzle, and I think it's just wonderful!
    I'm happier than a pied-billed grebe in Barbados.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I myself am CONFUSED about the Schpuzzle. Last night, I chose a word which would be lovely to be 'related' to DNA, as well as a composer whose last name, however, IS a verb, but the last two letters are reversed from where they should be. Also, to turn the first name into the word that I found, would require a bit of "mid-word" adjustment, i.e. merely changing the letters in the same place wouldn't work.

    Am I totally off-base?

    I did swoosh through all seven Entrees, though....oddly enough, the first one taking me the longest time (I kept choosing the wrong composers, and then MIS-read, as I so often do, about where the northernmost town was supposed to be...I mixed it up with the 13 original colonies, whereas that was supposed to be for the song town.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ViolinTeddy,
      Congratulations on your swooshing. The Greek goddess of victory would be green with envy!
      The composer is American, more popular than classical, and associated with both Hollywood and Broadway.

      LegoWhoObservesThatYouUsuallyHaveToTakeAtLeastAShordLeadOffBaseBeforeYouCanScamperHomeToScoreTheWinningRun

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    2. Well, its not being classical (which naturally is where I went first) might be why I have been having trouble. Onward....thanks [Green goddess of victory?????]

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  3. Heh heh, I just figured out the Dessert.

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  4. If you can rotate an H 90° to become a T, then I have SDB's puzzle...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that an "H" rotates to become an I, Ron...not a T, sadly...

      Delete
    2. I normally do not provide hints to my puzzles, but I will make an exception this time and say you should read the puzzle very carefully and not suppose what is not stated.

      Delete
  5. Hello all! Hope everyone is enjoying their time off under the circumstances. How's your sanity been lately? If you're like me, it's probably been hanging by a thread since, say, months(or years even!)before the pandemic started! If one more person utters the phrase "the new normal" again, I think I'm going to scream! Basically all I have to do today is the "Ask Me Another" podcast and Puzzleria!, and I've already heard the podcast. This week's Prize Crossword on the Guardian website is a very tough jumbo puzzle that could only be published in the PDF format, and the Private Eye Crossword is the same as last week's. Mom got us supper from the Green Top barbecue place in town. Two hamburger steak dinners, complete with bread and salad. Someone else suggested it, and Mom thought it sounded good, but she left most of hers to eat again later, and she said she wasn't too crazy about the food anyway. As for this week's P!, I could only find all the Entrees. Nothing else. Hints will, of course, be needed(though hopefully none as vague as SDB's attempt to offer help just now). Glad to see a little thing like a global pandemic hasn't ruined his usual "I've told you all I know" spirit as a fledgling puzzlemaker. Can't have everyone having too much fun nowadays, can we? Good luck, good solving, and STAY SAFE!

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  6. Late Sunday Hints:

    Schpuzzle:
    When catcher Smoky Burgess stepped up to the plate as a batter, stadium organists often would play one of the composers standards.
    The verb is a not-real-common-to-laypeople term used in typesetting.

    Adventuresome Appetizer:
    I normally do not provide hints to skydiveboy's puzzles, but I will make an exception this time and simply say: Solving this puzzle would be a snap for its creator.

    Subscription Slice:
    "Saw," a noun, a toothless noun...
    The title of the magazine contains two words; thus you must add a space to form the magazine title.

    Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices:
    ENTREE #1
    Doo-dah...
    ENTREE #2
    Oh oh!
    ENTREE #3
    The city: Post-transubstantiation, pre-Vatican II
    ENTREE #4
    The 87-year-old character is not human. (To hint at someone who would know this, translate "Foe row" into an non-kosher Latin language.)
    ENTREE #5
    Speaking of aviation, you can solve this puzzle if you have the "_right" stuff.
    ENTREE #6
    The name of well-known Pacific Northwest U.S. city is also the name of a "Great White North" city with the same name but with a population about four times greater.
    ENTREE #7
    The city is a major business hub in western Asia, as the sound of its name suggests, shillingly, at least in English.

    "Demisery" Dessert:
    The letter is added to the end of the name of the state. The name of a famous bridge downcoast from the state is a hint to the industry in question.

    LegoWhoIsWashingTonsOfLaundryAsA MemberOf TheClothesCleaningIndustry

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    Replies
    1. I'm pretty sure I have the right composer now for the Schpuzzle...especially since his first name ends up yielding the SAME DNA-related word that I had turned a prior composer's first name I'd chosen into, with just a bit more trouble (and then I had POSTED that composer's name, since I now knew it was wrong, only a minute or two later realizing that I was wrecking things re the DNA word, so I quickly deleted the post!!) I hope no one saw it.

      However, I simply can't figure out WHAT short word to turn the surname into. I had looked up its definition as a word, so understand the hint, but ....

      I'm still nowhere on the last two puzzles...sdb's and the Subscription. Sigh.

      Delete
    2. I meant to type "as a verb..."

      Delete
    3. ViolinTeddy,
      The typesetting verb that the composer has as a surname involves spacing between letters. If an "l" and "o" get too chummy scrunching together, for instance (No 6-foot coronavirus spacing whatsoever!), it might end up looking like a "b"... and the word "lousy" would end up looking like "busy."

      LegoWhoIslousyTryingToClarifyHisPuzzles

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    4. Thanks, Lego, but I already do know the definition of the verb. I haven't been able to turn that verb, however, into a biology-related word, thoug --- that is my trouble.

      Delete
    5. I suggest a stochastic approach.

      Delete
    6. ViolinTeddy,
      I think I understand your quandary in solving the Schpuzzle, but I am not certain.
      "The composer’s last name is a verb which, if not applied to itself, might sound like an informal shorter term for a branch of science that is also related to DNA."
      Those italics, perhaps, are the issue. After you scrunch together two letters in the composer's surname (which of course is also the verb), the result is not a real word, but it is a homophone of a short informal way of saying an academic field of study.

      LegoWhoBelievesPaul'sStochastic/ScholasticSuggestionOf"BasicallyThrowingThingsUpAgainstTheWallToSeeWhatAticks"IsSolidAdvice

      Delete
    7. Firstly, I realize that I had failed to grasp that "if not applied to itself" had meant to scrunch two letters together.

      SEcondly, I've essentially DONE a 'stochastic approach' (thanks Paul), randomly trying everything I could think of. The only two results either make no sense, or else, the scrunching of the two letters don't really make the letter that I would need. So at this point, there is nothing to do but wait until tomorrow. We are beating a dead horse by now!

      Delete
    8. The "informal shorter term for (the) branch of science that is also related to DNA" often precedes "lab" in the ivy halls of academia... nuts.

      LegoNotesThatIfYou'reOneOfTheNutsAtTheWestminsterKennelClubDogShowYouHear"Black"And"Chocolate"OftenPrecedingTheWord"Lab"

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    9. I think now I finally have the Schpuzzle too, and it was the "scrunching together" of the letters that really did it for me. I had everything up until that point. The only thing I could think of for the Dessert was one for my own home state, something about limited laboratory space for scientists. Basically I came up with A LAB A MAN, but I know that can't be the result of breaking the name in two. It's hard to look at state names and try to make up two completely different words by adding an extra letter at the end. I need a little more to go on with that one, Lego.

      Delete
    10. BTW tomorrow I turn the big 5-0! Would you believe we've made NO special plans to celebrate? I can't understand why!
      CranberryHappyToStillHaveHisHealthEspeciallyTheseDays!

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    11. It finally hit me, thanks to your last post, Lego. Duh, do I feel dumb!

      Delete
    12. And just figured out the Subscription Slice (well, had the beginning of it already, but those 3 letters finally occurred to me.)

      Delete
    13. Congrats on the Schpuzzle solve, cranberry and VT.
      And a "Schpecial" congratulations to cranberry on hitting the half-century mark!

      LegoLinkingToAnAlohaBirthdaySongForPatrick!

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    14. The Lord giveth, and Jack Lord taketh away! Book 'em, Lego!
      CranberryThinksTheBandPlayingTheShow'sThemeShouldHaveBeenCalledSteelyDanno

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  7. Have all except the Subscription Slice and (possibly) the Schpuzzle. Liked sdb's puzzle the best of this above-average set of brain-tweakers.

    Dessert hint: it is easier to solve if you pronounce the state's name incorrectly.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I wholeheartedly agree, geofan. skydiveboy's is an excellent puzzle-maker. Our blog has been blessed with great contributions from many brilliant folks over its history.
      Indeed, you yourself geofan, as well all who post comments on this blog regularly (as well as others) have allowed me to feature their artistry. I am so very grateful to all.

      LegoSincere

      Delete
  8. Grebes swim (see the picture lego added, above), and Barbados is known as "the land of the flying fish". Go figure.
    "CH" sounds differently in "stochastic" than it does in "approach".
    I really liked the idea of "kerning kern and "misspelling misspell. Escher might have also.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul,
      Yes indeed! "Fish gotta fly, birds gotta swim!"
      Two great links in one post.
      Your "stochastic hint, of course, flew right over my head (kinda like one of those Barbados fish)!
      Thanks for explaining your hint to the likes of me.

      LegoWho(WithTheAssistanceOfTheFormerMrs.MickeyRooneyArtieShaw&FrankSinatra)Sings:"Can'tHelpLovin'DozePostersOfMine!"

      Delete
  9. SCHPUZZLE: JEROME KERN => GENOME & KEM (CHEM)

    ADVENTURESOME APPETIZER: I could never find any one-word-titled book written BY an explorer, no matter how many I tried....Hillary, Cook, Vancouver, Amundsen, etc etc....sorry!

    SUBSCRIPTION SLICE: ADAGE => AD AGE => AD AGENCY => NYC

    ENTREES:

    1. CAMPTOWN RACES (STEPHEN FOSTER) & BELLINGHAM, WA => CAMPBELL (soup & BRUCE)

    2. OAKland, CALIfornia => OCALA (Florida)

    3. CORpus Christi, TEXas => CORTEX

    4. KINshasa, CONGo => KING KONG

    5. DAYton, OHio => DAY-O

    6. VANcouver, WASHington => VAN WASH

    7. DUbai, United Arab Emirates => DO YOU; Songs: DO YOU FEEL LIKE WE DO; DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET; DO YOU REALLY WANT TO HURT ME

    DESSERT: OREGON => ORE GONE

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT - Really? I thought you had solved it from your earlier post.

      Delete
    2. Nope, most sorry, sdb. I've made SO many posts this week, I don't know which one let you to believe I had been successful. Sigh....

      Delete
    3. Oh, I forgot to put in that my FIRST composer attempt had been GEORGE HANDEL....turning George also into GENOME, replacing the 'r' with an 'n' and the second 'g' with an 'm', but that then required moving the 'n' before the 'o'.. But Handel not being spelled HANDLE meant I knew that was wrong.

      Delete
  10. Schpuzzle: FREDERICK LOEWE => FRAN(cis) CRICK FRIEDRICH LÖWE

    Adventuresome Appetizer: (Shackleton) SOUTH => SUOTh => SCOTt

    Subscription Slice:

    Entrées
    #1: CAMP(town) + BELL(ingham, WA) => CAMPBELL
    #2: OAKLAND, CA => OCALA, FL
    #3: TEXAS, (cerebral) CORTEX (CORPUS CHRISTI)
    #4: KINSHASA, CONGO => KIN + G + CONG => KING KONG
    #5: DAYTON, OHIO => DAY OH => DE-O
    #6: VANCOUVER, WA => VAN WASH
    #7: DUBAI => DU U => DO YOU (Feel Like We Do, Really Want to Hurt Me, Know a Secret)

    Dessert: OREGON + E => ORE GONE ([gold] mining) [post-Sun-hint]

    ReplyDelete
  11. Schpuzzle
    JEROME KERN, GENOME, CHEM(CHEMISTRY)
    SDB'S Puzzle
    ERNEST SHACKLETON, "SOUTH!", (Robert Falcon)SCOTT(Both men explored the South Pole.)
    Subscription Slice
    ADAGE, AD AGE, AD AGENCY, NYC(New York City)
    Entrees
    1. CAMP(town, PA, founded by Job Camp)+BELL(ingham, WA)=(Bruce)CAMPBELL
    2. OAKLAND, CA; OCALA, FL
    3. CORPUS CHRISTI, TX; CORTEX
    4. KINSHASA, (Democratic Republic of the)CONGO; KING KONG
    5. DAYTON, OHIO; "DAY-O"(The Banana Boat Song)
    6. VANCOUVER, WA; VAN WASH
    7. DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES; DO YOU(Feel Like We Do, Want To Know A Secret, Really Want To Hurt Me?)
    Dessert
    OREGON, ORE GONE
    True personal note: As I was looking up the synonym for SAW, the first thing that caught my eye was the word MAXIM, which is the name of a popular magazine. So my original answer for the part about the type of workers who would read MAXIM would be those who work in a MAXIMALL(by my own "logic"; really this was the only word I could find that begins with MAXIM). I finally realized this was wrong when I couldn't figure out what city abbreviation the "ALL" part could be rearranged to spell. Thank God I went back to the original SAW synonyms and checked again!-pjb

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    Replies
    1. IN addition to Maxim, I had also put down "Axiom" which turns out to be a magazine, too. Not till Lego's last hint about a space being inserted did was I sure that ADAGE was right.

      Delete
  12. Am I the only one who questions Entree #1's wording? It said "plus the first syllable of the name of the northernmost U.S. city with a population of more than 50,000". By my map that would be Anchorage, Alaska, with a population of 291,538 and located at 61.2181° N, well north of Bellingham's 48.7519° N.

    Or is that just an answer for those of us who are not incontinent?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Agree. I thought the same thing, even though I am barely continent, from IBD.

      Delete
    2. I had noticed that too, eco & geo, only then decided to ignore it, since we all know WHOSE name we are trying to find in each week's "puzzlemaker' entree...this time needing "Bell", it was obvious that Alaska was out of the running!

      Delete
    3. Good point, ecoarchitect and geofan. I forgot to add the modifier "continental" before "U.S."

      LegoWhoCannot"KissWhileHe'sDancing..."ForPete'sSakeHeCannotEvenChewGumWhileHe'sWalking!

      Delete
  13. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  14. This week's official answers for the record, part 1:

    Schpuzzle Of The Week:
    “mispelled,” not misspelled, is “misspelled”
    Name a composer of music.
    Change one-third of the letters in the composer’s first name to form a word related to DNA (short for deoxyribonucleic acid, the hereditary material in humans and almost all other organisms).
    The composer’s last name is a verb which, if not applied to itself, might sound like an informal shorthand term for a branch of science that is also related to DNA.
    Who is this composer?
    Answer:
    Jerome Kern; (Genome; Kern --> Kem (if "Kern" is not properly kerned) --> Chem --> Chemistry

    Appetizer Menu

    Adventuresome Appetizer:
    International Explorers browse the World Wide...
    Think of a famous explorer of the past. Using Scrabble tiles, or similar letter pieces, spell the one word title of the book he wrote describing his most famous adventure.
    Then switch the positions of the second and third letters with each other.
    Now rotate the tiles in the second and last positions 90 degrees in order to discover the last name of another famous explorer of the past who is also known for exploring the same continent.
    Can you name these two well known explorers?
    Answer:
    Ernest Shackleton (who wrote "South"); Robert Falcon Scott
    Ernest Shackleton who wrote SOUTH and Robert Falcon SCOTT
    SOUTH
    SUOTH
    SCOTT

    MENU

    Subscription Slice:
    Periodical on the boardroom table
    Name a synonym of “saw” that also spells the title of a magazine. Adding three letters to the end of the title spells the name of a business whose employees are likely to read the magazine.
    Rearrange the letters you added to name a city, for short, that is home to many of these businesses.
    What are this magazine title, business and city?
    Answer:
    Ad Age (adage); ad agency; NYC (New York City)

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  15. This week's official answers for the record, part 2:

    Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices:
    Plano, Texas! Gherkinsburg, Delaware!

    Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices read:
    ENTREE #1
    Think of a U.S. town immortalized in the title of a song by a great American composer. The first syllable of the town’s name, plus the first syllable of the name of the northernmost U.S. city with a population of more than 50,000, will form well-known brand name... as well as the last name of a puzzle-maker.
    Who is this puzzle-maker?
    Hint: The first name of the founder of the immortalized U.S. town is Job. This town is situated in one of the 13 original colonies.
    Answer:
    Bruce Campbell; "Camptown Races", by Stephen Foster; Bellingham, Washington
    ENTREE #2
    Think of a well-known coastal-state U.S. city. Its population is over a quarter of a million. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first two syllables of the name of its state will sound like a city in another coastal state. This city is one of five in existence that dubs itself as the “Horse Capital of the World.”
    What are these two coastal-state cities?
    Answer:
    Oakland, California; Ocala, Florida
    ENTREE #3
    Think of a well-known U.S. city. Its population is over a quarter of a million. The first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will spell a body part that is “cerebral.”
    What is the state? What is the body part?
    Hint: The first two syllables of the city’s name are non-English word for “body.”
    Answer:
    Corpus Christi, Texas; Cortex
    ENTREE #4
    Think of a capital city somewhere in the world. Its population is counted in millions. Add a “g” to the end of the first syllable of the city’s name. If you say this new syllable, followed by the first syllable of the capital’s country, will sound like an 87-year-old character that some in the motion picture business have called “the Eighth Wonder of the World.”
    What is the capital city? Who is “the Eighth Wonder of the World?”
    Answer:
    Kinshasa, Congo; King Kong
    ENTREE #5
    Think of a Midwestern U.S. city associated with aviation. Its population is about a seventh of a million. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will sound like the title of a well-known Harry Belafonte song.
    What are this city and song?
    Answer:
    Dayton, Ohio; "Day-O" ("The Banana Boat Song")

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  16. This week's official answers for the record, part 3:
    (Riffing Off Shortz And Campbell Slices. continued):

    ENTREE #6
    Think of a well-known Pacific Northwest U.S. city. Its population is over 150,000. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its state will sound like a coin-or-credit-card-operated business that caters only to Pacificas, Siennas, Odysseys, Sedonas, VW buses, etc.
    What are this city and business?
    Answer:
    Vancouver, Washington; Van wash
    ENTREE #7
    Think of a well-known city in the Middle East. Its population is about four million. Phonetically, the first syllable of the city’s name plus the first syllable of the name of its country will sound like the first two words in song titles by The Beatles, Peter Frampton and Culture Club.
    What is the city? What are the three song titles?
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates; "Do You Want to Know a Secret?" (Beathles); "Do You Feel Like I Do?" (Peter Frampton); "Do You Really Want to Hurt Me?" (Culture Club)

    Dessert Menu

    Demisery Dessert:
    Industrial de-evolution
    By the mid-20th-century a once-booming industry in a U.S. state, and in neighboring states, had virtually ended.
    One reason for this is found by adding one letter to the name of the state and dividing the result in two. What is the state and what contributed to this industry’s demise?
    Answer:
    Oregon; Ore Gone (Ore + gon+e); The gold rush that boomed in Oregon beginning in the mid-19th-century lasted less than a century.

    Lego!

    ReplyDelete
  17. Congratulations to those daring enough to attempt the conquering of my latest puzzle and discovered the answer. One aspect of this puzzle that I like is that it does not ask one to rotate the two letter tiles in order to SPELL the name of the second explorer, but it simply says when you have done the required tile rotations you will DISCOVER the name of the second explorer. Too bad Will Shortz did not use it for an NPR Sunday offering.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What am I missing, SDB, that rotating an "H" 90 degrees somehow yields a "T" [rather than a capital I], just like Ron asked about??

      Delete
    2. What you are missing, VT, is that my puzzle is not asking you to reach a spelling of SCOTT. It is asking you to discover that Scott is the second explorer. I don't care if you accept that H rotated 90 degrees becomes a T or an I or nothing, as long as you have discovered Scott. If you found Shackleton's book, SOUTH, and did the rotations and discovered Scott's name, then you solved my puzzle. Did you do that? Or simply reply to ron?

      Delete
    3. I read sdb's puzzle to indicate that it spelled the explorer's name. However, what I did not assume was that the letters had to be upper-case letters (as "Scrabble tiles" implied). If one allows lower-case letters, an "h" rotated 90° looks like a "t" (though strictly speaking it is an enantiomerism).

      Hence my comment on tau (even closer resemblance than a lower-case "h".

      Delete
    4. Very interesting, geofan. Indeed, a lowercase tau, reflected an rotated, would look exactly like a lowercase "h".
      (Also, thanks for teaching me a new word: enantiomerism

      LegoTauLambda

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    5. I must admit to still NOT getting it. If I interpret sdb's post above that we were supposed to have gotten as far as "SCOTI" and then somehow 'discover' that Scott was the answer...what is the point of rotating the last letter AT ALL? Was the idea to get 'close to' the spelling of Scott? Like geo, I had interpreted 'discover' as "spell". But even now, I fail to see how calling it 'discover' means the last letter can be wrong. ???

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    6. I don't see what is so hard to understand. The rotated H does allow for it to appear to be a T and does basically come to look like SCOTT. But even if it doesn't in your opinion, you still cannot honestly say you did not then discover the other explorer is Scott.

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