Friday, May 3, 2019

“I say London, I say France...” Words on the dictionary; Not a feature of this creature; The secret life of plants; Icicles and broomsticks

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
The secret life of plants

Why is “plants” a doubly fitting heading for each of the words in the following list?
PLANTS:
yams
wheat
vines
tulip
pine nut
juniper 



Appetizer Menu

Correct ProNantesciation Appetizer
“I say London, I say France...”

Note: This tasty French Appetizer was composed by our friend Mark Scott of Seattle (also known by his screen name skydiveboy.) Mark has contributed many excellent puzzles to Puzzleria! over the years; this is one of my favorites. Enjoy!) 
Pronounce France correctly as the French do. Now see if you can find the well known French city that rhymes with France. 
Hint: It only shares two letters with France.


MENU

Zoological Slice:
Not a feature of this creature

Move the last letter of a large creature to the middle of the word and add an “r” to the end to form a word describing some other large creatures, but not this particular one. 
What creature is this? 
What word does not describe it?

Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
Icicles and broomsticks

Will Shortz’s April 28th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle is created by Joseph Young who conducts the blog “Puzzleria.” It reads: 
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first letter of the third word to the start of the first word, and you’ll form two means of transportation. What are they?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form a slang term for “messed up” and what sounds like a general term for a curse, plague or menace. What are these terms?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “or” in the middle (“___ or ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words, and you’ll form what sounds like a pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians – one whose nephew died in an airplane crash and the other who himself died in  an airplane crash.  
Who are they?
Hint: The pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians are possessive proper nouns.
ENTREE #3: 
Think of a somewhat familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first two letters of the first word to the start of the third word, and you’ll form an expression of disgust and a synonym for “nauseated.” What are they?
Hint: Add a letter to the beginning of the expression of disgust to form another synonym for “nauseated.”
ENTREE #4:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form a 3-letter word for where an animal can’t go if attached to a homophone of the altered third word. Where can’t the animal go? 
To what might the animal be attached?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form the last names of a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and a quarterback who played in two Super Bowls. 
Who are they?

Lexicographical Dessert:
Words on the dictionary

Name two words sometimes seen side-by-side on a dictionary. 
Rearrange 5 of the first words  6 letters, then rearrange 4 of those same 6 letters to form two specific examples of the second word. 
What are the words on the dictionary?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

134 comments:

  1. Lego forgot to mention that the APPETIZER PUZZLE is my creation. I hope you have fun trying to solve it.

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    Replies
    1. Nice puzzle. I have a solution, but it shares two letters (not one) with FRANCE.

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    2. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    3. I speak French and have lived in France. I have the answer that shares only one letter with France, but there are at least two other cities that rhyme with France but share more than one letter with France: Valence and Talence.

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. I forgot the city of Coutances, in Normandy.

      Click HERE to verify the correct pronunciation in French of these towns and cities. Le Mans, for example, does NOT rhyme with France.

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    6. I found a city (which I'd never heard of) which rhymes, but it has a first syllable that doesn't. Is that okay? (I see above that such cities ARE being mentioned.) And it shares only one letter....

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    7. This town shares 3 letters with France, but it is the simplest example of a rhyme with France: ANSE, HOW TO PRONOUNCE ANSE.

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    8. Per Wikipedia (French pronunciation given in IPA there) and also in audio at your site, there are two others equally as simple as Anse but that share only 2 letters with France.

      Delete
  2. I am embarrassed. I don't know how I missed it, but you are right, there are 2 letters that are the same in both words. I looked over and over and never saw what was right there.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. And I apologize also, to Mark (for doing a bad job of editing) and to Puzzlerian! solvers (for the confusion). I have corrected the hint in the Appetizer, which IMO is still an excellent puzzle.

      LegoWhoIsHavingARoughWeekButWhoAlsoCongratulatingYouPuzzlerian!sWhoFiguredThePuzzleOutAndProvidedOtherInterestingAlternativeRhymesAndNearRhymes

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    2. Mark doesn't deserve an apology for not doing a proper editing job, even though he did try.

      Delete
  3. sdb, thanks for the upeate. I have deleted my relevant comment (hopefully not too late). I STILL like the puzzle.

    btw, there are at least 2 one-syllable cities that qualify, if 2 letters can be shared. One is noted for its cathedral.

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  4. I deleted the post that gave one of the answere (not the other one though). Hopefully not too late.
    geofan/Ken

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  5. Metz [mɛs] and France [fʁɑ̃s] are not perfect rhymes, as the vowel is different (compare the two IPA transcriptions). The 2 one-syllable solutions I found each have the identical IPA vowel and ending consonant as France [...ɑ̃s].

    If VT's 1-letter, multi-syllable solution also meets the "IPA test", IMHO, she wins :) :) .

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    Replies
    1. Probably so. I have to admit to not speaking French, although I have been there. I love the language, but only know a few words.

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    2. I also have no formal training in French but speak German, Russian, and Spanish. and have been briefly in metropolitan Paris about 20 times, so have picked up a bit over the years. Also have been twice in St.-Pierre et Miquelon - a fascinating place that few know about and which would be a great solution to an obscure geographic puzzle.

      It will be interesting to see if VT's and Ron's solutions are the same city.

      Delete
    3. Well, now I AM confused. And will have to go try to find the two-letters-the-same city. I had gone and listened (hours ago, before posting about my only-one-letter-the-same city) to pronunciations of it, and all but one such pronunciation agreed with each other...however, the one that did NOT agree worried me, given what I had learned in years of French (from fourth grade through first semester of college, whereafter I switched to learning German), that you don't pronounce the 's' at the end of French words, unless there is a word beginning with a vowel immediately following it.

      However, for years it has bugged me that classical stations would pronounce Camille Saint-Saens' name with the 's' at the end, but this afternoon, I put him into the pronouncing webpages, too, and bingo, they DO pronounce the 's'. I don't understand, but so be it....but it makes my one-letter city's majority of pronunciations more plausible.

      Am I making any sense?

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. VT and Ron:
      It appears that the pronunciation of the final s in Saint-Saëns [IPA sɛ̃sɑ̃s] is an exception to the "standard" rules of French orthography (see Section 5 at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_orthography).
      With respect to "Saint-Saëns" specifically, see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Camille_Saint-Sa%C3%ABns, especially Note n1 there.

      It is possible that the putative solutions to the puzzle under discussion are also exceptions to the standard rules. More at Section 5 of the first Wikipedia reference given above.
      Geofan

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  6. Happy Friday everyone!
    I didn't see the latest puzzles late last night, I spent much of today babysitting, having supper from Arby's, listening to Ask Me Another, solving the Private Eye Crossword, leaving the Prize Crossword by Brendan unfinished, and only being able to get Entree #3 out of the whole bunch here(real toughies this week, and I'm really unsure about SDB's puzzle). Lego, I look forward to any and every hint you can supply under these circumstances. I'm going to need 'em.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Early Hints:

    Schpuzzle:
    Why can't I find a gasahol station in my area?

    Appetizer:
    "You say Pomme de terre, I say pomme dah terre!"

    ZS:
    Manna from heaven and hallowed oats

    ROSAYS:
    1. What may be done to a mole while downing a Michelob Light
    2. ...or, Robert v. Wade
    3. Excamation after eating a Peep + the feeling in the pit of your stomach after eating a Peep
    4. Nicotine and fin
    5. After Peach-Eating but before "Victory, Defeat or 'Kissing Your Sister' "

    LD:
    Haphazard Hovel

    LegoRamblin'ManEatingAPeaChick!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I already had Entrees 2 and 3, but the hint helped me get #1. [But I don't understand the #2 hint.]

      And suddenly the Dessert became clear (when the light went on thanks to the hint.)

      Delete
    2. Yesterday night I already solved the Appetizer, the Zoo, #2, and #3 before the Hints.
      Now to look at what the hints can accomplish...

      btw, it seems to me that I have seen the Zoo somewhere else in the past, but I forgot where...

      Delete
    3. The Hint for the LD rapidly gave me the answer. Here is mine:

      {\displaystyle \varphi (x)={\frac {1}{\sqrt {2\pi }}}e^{-{\frac {1}{2}}x^{2}}}

      There is a connection to both words of the answer.

      Delete
    4. Interestingly, geofan, I do not believe there is anything "haphazard" about your posted property. It is advisable in this case, however, to "get the L out of there!"

      LegoWhoIsRemindedOfACharacterPortrayedByGloriaS.

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    5. Don't make the mistake of asking a colonel to help with the removal of an L.

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    6. Agreed, skydiveboy. The colonel might blow it.

      LegOdieOCologne

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    7. Au contraire, my hint is definitely haphazard, even though it may deviate from the norm.

      Delete
  8. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  9. Got the Zoological Slice and Entree #1, but that's all so far.

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  10. Found 3 solutions for #5 today, but the "-- and --" phrase for each is weak. I defer listing them here, as 1/2 of one of them may be from the preferred solution.

    Still in the dark for #4. Have some leads on #1.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Sunday Wee Hours (CDT) Hints:
    Schpuzzle:
    I had sought a trio of other plants but had no luck... perhaps you can find them?

    Appetizer:
    "You say toe-may-toe, I say toe-rahn-toe and toe-lee-doe!"

    ZS:
    As in my hint for the puzzle, seek how to come up with a more nifty solution; and you don't need an MA in Enigmatology to do it!

    ROSAYS:
    1. What's the familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle? If you've read Oliver Twist or are a fan of Triple-Dog-Dare-Ya-Darkness, that riddle shall be solved.
    2. I'd say you have a fifty-fifty chance of solving this puzzle.
    3. This ought to be a fast and simple solve. You might want to consult the "Peeps Dessert" from our Eastertime blog.
    4. Something bad in a butt, something useful on a budgie... a word in this song + a word in this song
    5. Avoid Siberian Bottlings. Bubbly? Get it the 'ell out!

    LD:
    A rich man minds his mansions and counts his Dough-Re-Mi.

    LegoNotes"WhoCaresHowWeAllPronouncePotatoAndTomato...IScreamYouScreamWeAllScreamForIceCream!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Correction:
      ZS:
      As in my hint for the Schpuzzle, seek how to come up with a more nifty solution; and you don't need an MA in Enigmatology to do it!

      LegoWhoNeedsSchooling!

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    2. I got nothin'. Maybe I do need a MA in Enigmatology.

      Delete
    3. ...or maybe just better hints.

      Delete
    4. Given your comment above, cranberry, perhaps my most recent hint to the Zoological Slice would have been better stated as (and, to be honest, more correctly stated as): "As in my hint for the Schpuzzle, seek how to come up with a more nifty solution; but you should first get an MA in Enigmatology to do it!"
      So,
      A few consecutive words in the hint are helpfully homophonic.
      Also, a few other consecutive words in the hint provide a definition for a comparative adjective which, when a degree both of us could use precedes it, does not describe the creature.
      As for the Schpuzzle reconsider my May 4 at 2:27 AM Early Hint:
      "Why can't I find a gasahol station in my area?"
      Don't read between the lines... (well, that would probably be tough because there is really only one line!). Read rather between the words.

      LegoHookedOnHomophonics

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    5. Lego and cranberry-
      At first I was also in the dark on your hints for the ZS (even though I already knew its solution). But now I get them both. Now I have to go and staff a ski lift. See you after lunch.

      Delete
  12. Lego - thanks. Got #1 and #4, only #5 and Schpuzzle still out.

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  13. Well, I'm behind Geo/Ken because although Entree #4 JUST NOW came to me [and I am also still without the Schpuzzle or #5], for the life of me, I haven't been able to 'read between the words" for the Zoo Slice...and no inspiration has suddenly hit me for it, either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ViolinTeddy,
      Of all the puzzles I have created for Puzzleria!, this week's Schpuzzle is one of my favorites.
      Perhaps the most favorite puzzle I have created, however, may be the key for understanding my "read between the words" hint. It appeared on P! about a year ago:
      What very rare and curious property do the five questions below share that most questions (like the one you are now reading) do not?
      What helps undo eskimos’ overcoats?
      Why outlaw antigun statutes?
      Who prepares ingestibles, sushi, miso?
      When do fittest hearts expire?
      Who overtaxed America’s hierarchy?

      However, my "read between the words" advice pertained not to the Zoological Slice but to the Schpuzzle:
      As for the Schpuzzle reconsider my May 4 at 2:27 AM Early Hint:
      "Why can't I find a gasahol station in my area?"
      Don't read between the lines... (well, that would probably be tough because there is really only one line!). Read rather between the words.


      LegoWhoHasAlwaysSungThePraisesOfBenAdamHossAndJoe'sMasterChef

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    2. Yeah, sorry about mixing up which puzzle the 'read between the words' hint was for. Especially when the comments/given hints become very lengthy and verbose, as they are now doing, I tend to get confused....and can't keep straight which hint was for which puzzle!

      I am completely lost, at this point, on the Schpuzzle and all this plant discussion. I look forward to Wednesday, when hopefully it will make some sense to me.

      Meanwhile, my quest for the Zoo slice continues (though I need to go try to find WHAT hints it had, because by now, I can not remember!!)

      Delete
    3. VT-
      wrt Schpuzzle, I would suggest to ignore the extended plant discussion at first. You will probably get Lego's Early hint sooner than I (an analytical chemist) did. But concentrate on Lego's LumpText in his post of May 6, 12:34 PM (below): it is also a hint in itself.

      wrt ZS: Ecclesiasties 1:2 (KJV or RSV) may give you rhyme or reason to rejoice with the gentle beast.

      wrt sdb's French Appetizer, please see my post of May 5, 4:28 PM (above). I may have further relevant comments on Wednesday evening.

      Good luck and keep thinking :) :) :)

      Delete
    4. Thanks, geo. I will go look up what you suggested.

      I do have, however, a two-letter-the-same city for sdb's appetizer, as well as my original one-letter city.

      Not sure I have the 'oomph' to tackle the Schpuzzle at this point. But who knows, finally solving the ZS might inspire me? Anyway, thanks....btw, what does an analytical chemist do specifically?

      Delete
    5. VT-
      See Analytical Chemistry for some general background. Before I retired, I mostly did classical and electrochemical methods, see at Titrimetry .

      Delete
  14. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  15. I had both "halves" of #4 in hand after your first hint, but I was unfamiliar with the slang usage meaning "messed up" and, thus, missed it. Finally it came to me.

    I am still in the dark on #5 and the Schpuzzle (btw, where did the Sch come from?.

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    Replies
    1. Logo - Got it, thanks :). My task is done (Phew!)
      My difficulty was that he did not *start* in either Super Bowl. I assume he must have been a substitute in each one?

      Question: Is the musician's name pronounced to rhyme with the word that transforms into the QB's name?

      Delete
    2. Note: This lengthy comment originally appeared prior to geofan's comment immediately above.

      geofan,
      Some arcane gridiron history:
      The QB who played in two Super Bowls was given a nickname that was a mispronunciation of "brother" by one of his older siblings. The QB, whose given name is Walter, enrolled in a college which is a homophone of a hyphenated description of a type if highway. He was known by his football teammates there as "Bubba," which was similar to but not the exact nickname he had grown up with. His nickname was correctly changed back to his boyhood name after he transferred to Northeast Louisiana.
      Some arcane folkie-rocky history:
      The songwrier sang in a duo with a future Eagle. His songs have been recorded by the Eagles, Bonnie Raitt and a woman who once dated him (and who also dated a governor).

      Thanks for asking about the "Sch" in "Schpuzzle."
      About a year ago, Word Woman, ecoarchetect and others suggested I "streamline" the look of Puzzleria! Word Woman was my mentor in helping me launch this blog. She had launched her excellent Partial Ellipsis Of The Sun (PEOTS) blog in October of 2013, about seven months before I launched Puzzleria!
      Anyway, one "streamlining suggestion" Word Woman made was to feature just one puzzle each week, placing it at the top of the blog, above the "menu" of other puzzles. (Others have suggested that I reduce the number of puzzles, but my Puzzleria! philosophy has always been: "At a pizzaria or other restaurant, you order just what looks good to from the menu; you need not order everything.")
      The name I came up with for the "packaging" of the featured puzzle was "Schpuzzle of the Week," a take-off of those "Special of the Day" entrees that many restaurants offer. I agonized over what consonant or consonant blend should precede "-puzzle" to make it best echo the word "special." After rejecting "spuzzle" and "shpuzzle" (which did sound enough like "special") I settled on "Schpuzzle" which, for some reason, I thought would be easier to pronounce than "shpuzzle." (Both sounded faintly Yiddish to me.) Actually, no other English word that I can find begins with "SCHP" and only only one ("shpiel," a variant spelling of "spiel") begins with "SHP."
      Anyway, that's my "schpiel" about "schpuzzle," and I'm schtickin' to it!

      LegoAdds:NoTheQuarterbackWhoPlayedInTwoSuperBowlsWasNotBillClinton

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    3. geofan,
      Regarding your question about whether the musician's name is pronounced to rhyme with the word that transforms into the QB's name: I hope so but am not sure. The musician is not so famous so I am not sure how often, if at all, I have heard his name pronounced. I did just now however seach-engineer "How is (the musician's) last name pronounced?" and, amazing, I got one of those pronunciation recordings (spoken by a robot or by a human being who sounds really bored). The results to my ears were inconclusive, halfway between the two logical possibilities.

      LegoWhoIsAMoutherOfOtherPronunciationPossibilities

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    4. Not to give anything away, but if the songwriter in question is J. D. Souther, what rhymes with Souther?

      Delete
    5. Referring to the genesis of "schpuzzle", I had always wondered that too, but somehow had never thought to ask. Am glad geo/Ken did ask. Thanks for the explanation!

      Delete
    6. cranberry,
      Pronunciation:
      Souther
      J.D. Souther

      LegoAdmitsThereMayBeOtherWaysToPronounceSouther

      Delete
    7. It's still not helping me. Sorry. How about a few more hints? Maybe if I got the football player's name it'd help.

      Delete
    8. cranberry,
      The football player's surname = Jewish rite + "Once, twice, (prefix meaning the two words that belong here) a lady..."

      LegoLionel

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    9. IMHO, the ladies are red herrings (though maybe required in a legal setting). I got it from Lego's earlier hint "Bubbly? Get it the 'ell out!", then using Wikipedia on the literal result.

      Delete
  16. Correction: #4 in my above post should read #1.

    Also, I had written half of the solution to #4 but only solved it after your second hint.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Just solved the Schpuzzle :). Now I am looking for the trio.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. geofan,
      If you find even one of the trio (.333 ain't a bad Puzzleria! batting average) I will be flooded with a trio of emotions: joy at your success; envy at your success; regret that I didn't find it first. It does seem possible that these particular plants may exist because there are no high-value Scrabble letters (such as J, X, Q or Z) involved. Indeed, there is no letter involved that is higher than a value of 4.

      LegoWhoWishesgeofanSuccessOnHisBotanicalQuest

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    2. I did not find one for one of the three of the trio. However, during my botanical search, I unexpectedly stumbled on the fact that one of the missing trio anagrams into another member of said trio, if you use the same transform algorithm on it. Cool?

      The botanical quest continues.

      Delete
    3. geofan,
      That is a great discovery, and indeed cool. Indeed it is more than cool... it is positively frigid!
      Or, rather, negatively frigid: -288 degrees Fahrenheit, or (after the Al-Gore-got-rhythm-Global-Warming transformation) -435 degrees Fahrenheit!

      LegoSaysOhWait!ThatOughtToBeAGlobalCoolingTransformation(EvenThough435DegreesDoesSoundPositivelyALotHotterThan288Degrees)

      Delete
  18. I'm wondering somewhat desperately if one could refer to a single cherry of the Montmorency or Morello variety as an "M" cherry.

    Hi, I'm new by the way. I've lurked for a while. Lego, I very much appreciate your puzzling creativity and diligence.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome to Puzzleria!, Megatart Stratagem! Thank you for your comment and kind words.
      I like your "M-cherry" suggestion for one of our three missing plants. Here is my reasoning: There is such a thing as an "F-bomb." Perhaps an "F-cherry-bomb" and an "M-cherry-bomb" are things too. And, if an "M-cherry-bomb" is a thing, why not simply an "M-cherry"?

      LegoWhoDoesNotHoweverAdvocateTheUseOfFBombsOnPuzzleria!

      Delete
  19. Interesting question by Megatart.
    I found ASH NUT, TRUNKS, RICE RUM, RYE CURD and RYE CHUM, but these are not plants proper.

    I continue to search for more obscure genera.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Fund a "true" answer: PRUNUS. A genus of trees and shrubs including plums, cherries, peaches, nectarines, apricots, and almonds.

    ReplyDelete
  21. One more "true" answer and one possibility:

    RATANS: plural of RATAN, variety of rattan, the rattan palm. It is used to make RATAN canes that are used (notably in Singapore) as a punishment for crimes.

    MURREYS, plural of MURREY, the mulberry fruit. It is cited at https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/murrey but is not listed in M-W 3rd Unabridged (other than for the heraldic color).

    My keyboard is glad that I found a different anagram search site that allows for use of wildcards (?)

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    Replies
    1. geofan,
      I am joyful, envious and regretful regarding the "fruits" of your research and diligence (but mostly, joyful). I hereby officially declare that the three mysteriously missing plants have been, miraculously, dug up!
      I loved the creativity of Megatart Stratagem's "M-cherry" and was also impressed by your "Trunks" and "Ash nut" candidates. (If I can use "pine nut" why can't you suggest "ash nut"?!)
      PRUNUS, RATANS and MURREYS are IMHO botanically legit!

      LegoProclaimsTheLifeOfPlantsAsBeingNowComplete(AndAfterWednesday'sRevolutionaryRevelationsNoLongerSecret):MurreysVinesWheatYamsJuniperRatansPrunusPineNutTulip!

      Delete
    2. Only problem is that ashes do not have nuts. Their seeds are like maple seeds. On the other hand "pine nut" is a common designation for the seeds of several pines.

      Trunks are, of course, parts of many plants.

      Delete
    3. If Wikipedia is to be believed, yes. See under "Description".

      LegoNotesAlsoThatPeopleSeemToBePlantingKissesAllTheTime!

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    4. I was taught that trees have rings, so that you can tell how many years old they are. But now I discover that palm trees, like ratans for example, do not have rings! And then geofan goes and questions if a tulip is even a plant! My world is turning upside-down!

      LegoWhoCannotBeDissuadedFromHisBeleafThatTheLargestPlantIsNotTheSequoiaButTheJuniperAndThatIfATulipIsIndeedAPlantThenItIsTheSmallestPlant

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    5. And then, of course, we have THANES, FOOTMEN, and ATHEISTS. But these are all people and not plants.

      Delete
    6. Lego,
      Just because palm trees have palms it doesn't mean they have fingers. And, while we're at it, I hope you will endeavor to tiptoe carefully through the tulip issue.

      Delete
  22. OK, I only have the Zoological Slice and all the odd Entrees. I need good hints for the rest. Tomorrow's the big reveal. Go, Lego!

    ReplyDelete
  23. Tuesday Evening Hints:
    Schpuzzle:
    Plants seem stationary, pretty much "planted" in one spot. But, then again, there are creeping vines. Some desert plants roll into a ball and blow to another place where they settle and take root again...
    In this puzzle the plants actually transform into full-fledged etymological wanderers!
    ROSAYS:
    2. One politician had a daughter named Kara and granddaughter named Kiley; the other had a daughter named Cokie.
    When the familiar three-word phrase is spoken, there is almost always something that has been minted in the vicinity.
    4. Those who perform the three-word phrase did it as a form of public torture and humiliation. Happily, it is likely pretty much a punishment of the past.
    "Where the animal can’t go" is a word that can be followed by "cry," by "out" (especially if John Denver is present), or, in the Flickertail State, by "go."
    "To what might the animal be attached" is a word sometimes followed by "ball."
    LD:
    The two words are not Merriam and Webster. They are words that actually appear in this dictionary as well as on it.
    If you change one letter in the first word you get something kidnappers collect.
    If you change one letter in the second word you get what "War of Will," "Cutting Humor" or "Long Range Toddy" is.

    LegoSaysThatKidnappersMayCollectStampsTradingCardsOrPorcelainDollsButThat'sNotWhatHeIsGettingAt

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  24. Got everything but the Schpuzzle and the SDB puzzle. I just can't figure out the whole "plants" thing! Anything else, Lego?

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  25. One More Tuesday Evening Schpuzzle Hint:
    _______ Cougar
    _____ in Blue Jeans
    _____ shoes
    ____ Bar
    _______, Florida
    ______ Sky
    "______ person!"
    _______ Beach
    _____cracy

    ____Lambda

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  26. One Final Wednesday Morning Schpuzzle Hint:

    _____ in Blue Jeans = VINES
    _____ shoes = WHEAT
    ____ Bar = YAMS
    _______, Florida = JUNIPER
    _______ Beach, Florida = PINE NUT
    _____cracy = TULIP

    Concentrate especially on the plants "Vines" and "Juniper."

    LegoRecallsThatAPaulSang"VinesAndYamsAreAlrightTonight..."

    ReplyDelete
  27. I have two answers to SDB's appetizer but both share TWO letters with FRANCE: SENS and MENS.

    ReplyDelete
  28. SENS, FRANCE
    HEADS OR TAILS > TED'S & HALE'S (Note: they never found the body of Cokie's Dad, nor the wreckage of his plane)
    QUICK AND EASY > (S)ICK & QUEASY
    A MANATEE is not a MANEATER (nor was a MAstodon or MAmmoth [unless, of course, the man's name happened to be "Herb"]) ... "hallowed oats", indeed!!
    BROTHER and SISTER > (J.D.) Souther & (Bubby) Brister
    TAR and FEATHER > FAR & TETHER
    MODERN STANDARD > NORM & MODE isn't right; I need a 5-letter word. OK, so it's RANDOM HOUSE > MANOR, DORM
    I might have been able to get the PLANET puzzle from the "wanderer" clue if I had seen that clue before the appearance of the two following it, which were waaay TMI.
    I guess I skipped over the "messed up menace" puzzle, thinking I'd figure it out later. I didn't.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul, you deserve full credit... heck extra credit(!) for your MODERN STANDARD > NORM & MODE answer.

      LegoSuggestThatIfYouNeedAFiveLetterWordThatGoesWithNormGoWithCliff

      Delete
  29. SCHPUZZLE: ?????

    APPETIZER: SOISSONS, France [sharing only N]; SENS, FRANCE [sharing N and E]

    ZOO SLICE: The only thing I could ever come up with, due to the various biblical references, is : ANGEL? => ANGLER?

    ENTREES:

    1. BLACK and WHITE => WHACK & BLIGHT

    2. HEADS or TAILS => TED'S & HALE'S [Sens. Kennedy and Hale Boggs]

    3. QUICK and EASY => ICK & QUEASY; SICK

    4. TAR and FEATHER => FAR & TETHER

    5. SISTER and BROTHER => BRISTER & SOUTHER (never heard of them, would have never gotten without the initial long descriptive hints)

    DESSERT: RANDOM HOUSE => MANOR & DORM

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  31. My answers agree with Paul's, except as noted below:
    sdb: SENS, LENS. See separate discussion of other possibilities (MENS, METZ, ANSE, SAINT-SAENS, SOISSONS) in my separate post (to follow, as it will take some time to compose it). IMHO, SENS is the "best" answer, as it is best known of those with a perfect rhyme and shares the fewest letters with FRANCE. I apologize for posting (near the start of this week's blogs) SENS as the answer. That was before Lego corrected the puzzle to refer to two shared letters. So at the time, I thought that SENS was not the sought after answer and could post it.

    RANDOM HOUSE - MANOR, DORM. I considered also possibilities with [POCKET BOOKS], FRENCH, GERMAN, [EDITOR, CHIEF] but didn't get far. I felt tethered.

    PLANET. I apologize for the extended discussion of the added plants, but the botanical quest gave me (and hopefully Lego) some modest joy and completed the set.

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  33. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  34. wrt possible solutions for sdb's puzzle, which was tres elegant:
    FRANCE [IPA fʁɑ̃s] has the final IPA phonemes ...ɑ̃s. IMHO, any perfect rhyme must end in these IPA letters to qualify as a solution. Here are the possibilities:

    SENS [IPA sɑ̃s] and LENS [IPA lɑ̃s] each qualify as perfect rhymes. But SENS is better known than LENS. Hence IMHO it is best solution.

    ANSE [probably ɑ̃s, IPA not given in English or French Wikipedia] is also likely a perfect rhyme with FRANCE. But it shares 3 letters, hence is less elegant.

    SAINT-SAENS [IPA sɛ̃sɑ̃s] is also a perfect rhyme (with an additional syllable) but shares 3 letters with FRANCE. Hence, less elegant. wrt its association with the composer, see my above post from May 5 at 4:28 PM

    SOISSONS [IPA swasɔ̃] shares only one letter with FRANCE but has a different final vowel [IPA ɔ̃ vs ɑ̃] and the final s is not pronounced. So it does not rhyme with FRANCE.

    METZ [IPA mɛs] is well known and shares only one letter with FRANCE, but the IPA vowel is different [ɛ vs ɑ̃] so it does not rhyme perfectly. Metz was German during much of its history, hence the unusual orthography and pronunciation.

    The IPA pronunciations for each of the above may be seen in the respective English Wikipedia entries

    MENS [IPA mɛ̃s] see French Wikipedia has a different vowel [IPA ɛ̃ vs ɑ̃] but the pronunciation does end in IPA [s]. But it is not a perfect rhyme. Interestingly, there is also a SENS in French Switzerland (Suisse-Romande) that is pronounced [IPA sɛ̃s], differently from SENS and LENS in France.

    That is all. Any more of this and I will be able to speak fluently and post modified typefaces in blogs [thanks, Lego :) ]

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I beg to disagree re the final "S" not being pronounced in Soissons, geo....as I had noted up above somewhere in this now-endless bunch of comments, after I'd found Soissons, I went to listen to multiple pronunciations, and only ONE of them left off the "S".....and as I had explained about Saint-Saens, I'd always been annoyed to hear classical radio announcers PRONOUNCE the 's', till I checked online (after lo these many years) to hear it DID have the 's' sound. Thus, I had really been on the side of NO "S", but the many examples of its sounding-out convinced me.

      Hence, I maintain that SOISSONS is still a viable solution for sharing only one letter with France.

      Delete
  35. Regarding my various hints:
    sdb PLANTS: Using the "substitute one letter" algorithm, SATURN transforms to URANUS.
    Is a tulip a plant?" => Is Pluto a planet? [recall the IAU's demotion of Pluto to a dwarf planet (which itself transforms to FRAUD PLANET :) ]
    Lego's post of May 7 at 8:34 AM was a pure stroke of astronomical genius. I loved it!
    THANES, FOOTMEN, and ATHIESTS transform to the Sun, the Moon, and the stars. They are not PLANTS.

    ZS: Staff a ski lift => man a T(-bar) => man a tee.
    Ecclesiastes [sorry for earlier misspelling] 1:2 (KJV or RSV) is the well-known "Vanity, vanity, all is vanity, saith the Preacher." Vanity rhymes with MANATEE, which is a gentle beast. If you don't say it once, repeat, repeat, repeat until they get it... :)

    LD: The equation
    {\displaystyle \varphi (x)={\frac {1}{\sqrt {2\pi }}}e^{-{\frac {1}{2}}x^{2}}}
    is what came out when I cut-and pasted the Gauss equation for normal (random) distribution (see at Wikipedia). Gauss rhymes with HOUSE.

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  36. Schpuzzle
    The category PLANTS could also be PLANETS.
    YAMS=MARS
    WHEAT=EARTH
    VINES=VENUS
    TULIP=PLUTO
    PINE NUT=NEPTUNE
    JUNIPER=JUPITER
    Menu
    MANATEE, MANEATER
    Entrees
    1. BLACK AND WHITE, WHACK AND BLIGHT
    2. HEADS OR TAILS, TED'S(Kennedy)OR HALE'S(Boggs)
    3. QUICK AND EASY, ICK AND QUEASY
    4. TAR AND FEATHER, FAR AND TETHER
    5. BROTHER AND SISTER, (J.D.)SOUTHER AND(BUBBY)BRISTER
    Dessert
    RANDOM HOUSE, MANOR, DORM
    I didn't get SDB's France puzzle. C'est la vie.-pjb

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  37. BTW Bubby should not have been in All Caps.

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  38. #5: Bubbly - L => Bubby (Lego's hint). A Wikipedia search of Bubby yields Bubby Brister as the first choice.
    I considered to hint at "blister" but thought that it might be too blatant.

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  39. Correction:
    Ecclesiastes 2:1 (KJV) correctly reads:
    "Vanity of vanities, saith the Preacher, vanity of vanities; all is vanity."

    Forgive me, Lego

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  40. Okay, my intended answer to the well known French city that rhymes with France is REIMS. IPA letters stand for India Pale Ale in my book.

    Reims Rhymes with France – Rick Steves' Travel Blog
    https://blog.ricksteves.com/blog/reims-rhymes-with-france/

    Reims was the biggest city on the Western Front in World War I, and about ... expert the French are about floodlighting their great monuments.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I do speak French and no Frenchman would pronounce REIMS to rhyme with France. Listen to the FRENCH pronunciation HERE.

      Delete
    2. Compare the above to the FRENCH pronunciation of FRANCE.

      Delete
    3. ron, None of those pronunciations agree with each other. Why do yours Trump mine?

      Delete
    4. I agree with Ron, having spent many years taking French. Sorry, sdb.....

      Delete
    5. Well, VT, his 2 examples do not even closely agree with each other, and the first one rhymes with France. So, sorry, VT, but many others agree with me, and many of them are French.
      Also, if you learned French in this country, you did not learn French, but Amerikan French. The same is true for Spanish, German, or any other foreign country. You cannot learn to speak perfect foreign languages here in this country.

      Delete
  41. sdb-
    REIMS was my first thought (even before SENS) but I saw that it was IPA [ʁɛ̃s] as compared to FRANCE [IPA fʁɑ̃s]. For the French pronunciations compare from the French Wikipedia, Reims and France.

    Rick Steves is OK if you want to be an American tourist in Europe, but I suspect that several contributors to this site have better knowledge of French (and other foreign languages) than he does.
    My apologies if you know him (or are he): he has his good points also.

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  42. IPA = International Phonetic Alphabet

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  43. Sens is known for its cathedral (which is the first Gothic cathedral in France, see here and also as the native city of William of Sens, who partially rebuilt Canterbury Cathedral in England. But I agree that Reims is better known.

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  44. This Frenchman's pronunciation, to my ear, sounds exactly like France:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e1fRSA0m9wQ

    I know IPA stands for International Phonetic Alphabet, but I do not comprende those (-) bits.

    I did not make the puzzle up from the Rick Steves site, and only found it later on. There are lots of sites that say Reims rhymes with France, and that is where I learned how to pronounce it, and it was some time ago. I thought up the puzzle recently. I also know you, geofan, mentioned and deleted Reims earlier. I had no idea this pronunciation thing was going to be controversial.

    Rick Steves lives close to where I live, but I don't know him personally. He butchers foreign words, but I still find his show interesting when I watch it.

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  45. To my ears, that youtube voicing sounds more like "aanh" and France more like "oonh (where the n denotes nasalization.

    From Wikipedia on French phonology,
    "In some dialects ... there is an attested tendency for nasal vowels to shift in a counterclockwise direction: /ɛ̃/ tends to be more open and shifts toward the vowel space of /ɑ̃/..."

    So the upshot is, it may depend on the given native French speaker.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There seem to be many different pronunciations I have discovered since posting this puzzle. Maybe "Fifty Million Frenchmen Can't Be Wrong" can be rong.

      Delete
    2. True. But note:
      Most people I meet (including educated and well-traveled ones) would pronounce the state due S of you to rhyme with "hexagon"; Lancaster, PA to have equal stress on the first and second syllables; and Newfoundland (Canada) with the main stress on the first syllable. In each case, the given pronunciation is shibboleth to expose the fact that the speaker "ain't from here".

      Delete
    3. I thought it was Newfie. Been there and Oregon, but not Lancaster, although I did enjoy him in 1900 a,k.a. Novecento.

      Delete
    4. The Newfie is the inhabitant. Correct pronunciation (as any Canadian will tell you) is Newfoundlánd (accent on last syllable.

      Lancaster sounds like Lánkisster or you are "from away" (to use the Newfie expression).

      ...and then, of course, there are Sequim and Mukilteo in your woods of the neck... Shibboleths abound near Puget Sound.

      Delete
    5. I used to do business in Kanada and met Newfies outside of Gnufoundland at times. And we Methow, I'm not sure.

      Delete
    6. [without looking], how would you pronounce Bowie (as the city on MD)?

      Delete
    7. geofan, I assume you are aware of Dildo, Newfoundland? Not to mention Dildo South.

      Delete
    8. I have always pronounced Bowie: booE.

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    9. BOO-ee is the usual here in MD. But I have read many outsiders pronounce it differently.

      Delete
    10. I have been in Dildo, South Dildo, and even near there in Come-by-Chance and overnighted in Goobies. Also have been in Hearts Desire, Hearts Content and Hearts Delight, all in a day. The telegraph museum in H.C. is most interesting and highly to be recommended.
      But I have never been to Leading Tickles.

      Delete
    11. I am truly diminished! I have only been to Gander, and a gander is all I got. But you know what they say. "You can take the boy out of Dildo, but you can't take the....." Shit! Now I've upset Lego. Sorry Lego, but I couldn't control myself.

      Delete
    12. Actually, I went on my honeymoon (July 1988) to NF (also to SPM). I had been to both by myself in 1982. In 1988 we also went to Carbonear, Holyrood, sailed across Placentia Bay and saw Conception Bay (with some icebergs). But, alas, the marriage did not last.

      Delete
    13. Sounds like it may have a chilling effect.

      Delete
    14. We also drove through Sequim (with its rain shadow) and were in Humptulips and Forks. It was a different time back than in Forks.

      Delete
    15. The interesting thing about Forks back then is that there were no forks; you had to either continue straight ahead or turn around and go back. In Seattle high society we simply refuse to say Humptulips. What were they thinking anyway?

      Delete
    16. I believe back then (1986) Forks was still a lumbering town. Now it is different.

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    17. Well there may not be logging there anymore, but they are still lumbering.

      Delete
    18. My nomenclature error, sorry. I am going to lumber on to bed but may log on tomorrow.

      Delete
    19. Is that your way of boughing out?

      Delete
  46. This week's answers for the record, part 1:

    Schpuzzle Of The Week:
    The secret life of plants

    Why is “plants” a doubly fitting heading for each of the words in the following list?
    PLANTS:
    yams
    wheat
    vines
    tulip
    pine nut
    juniper
    Answer:
    If you replace one letter in "plants" and rearrange the result you can form the word "planet." If you replace one letter in each of the plants in the list and rearrange the result you can form the name of a planet: Yams (Mars); Juniper (Jupiter); Pine nut (Neptune); Tulip (Pluto); Vines (Venus); Wheat (Earth).

    Appetizer Menu

    Appetizer
    “I say London, I say France...”

    Pronounce France correctly as the French do. Now see if you can find the well known French city that rhymes with France.
    Hint: It only shares two letters with France.
    Answer:
    Reims

    MENU

    Zoological Slice:
    Not a feature of this creature

    Move the last letter of a large creature to the middle of the word and add an “r” to the end to form a word describing some other large creatures, but not this particular one. What creature is this? What word does not describe it?
    Answer:
    Manatee; Maneater

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  47. This week's answers for the record, part 2:

    Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
    Icicles and broomsticks
    https://www.enchantedlearning.com/wordlist/transportation.shtml

    Will Shortz’s April 28th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle is created by Joseph Young who conducts the blog “Puzzleria.” It reads:
    Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first letter of the third word to the start of the first word, and you’ll form two means of transportation. What are they?
    Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices read:
    ENTREE #1:
    Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form a slang term for “messed up” and what sounds like a general term for a curse, plague or menace. What are these terms?
    Answer:
    whack and blight (black and white)
    ENTREE #2:
    Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “or” in the middle (“___ or ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words, and you’ll form what sounds like a pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians – one whose nephew died in an airplane crash and the other who himself died in an airplane crash. Who are they?
    Hint: The pair words used to describe possessions of two late Democratic politicians are possessive proper nouns.
    Answer:
    Ted's and Hale's (Kennedy and Boggs) (Heads and tails)
    ENTREE #3:
    Think of a somewhat familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Move the first two letters of the first word to the start of the third word, and you’ll form an expression of disgust and a synonym for “nauseated.” What are they?
    Hint: Add a letter to the beginning of the expression of disgust to form another synonym for “nauseated.”
    Answer:
    Ick! and queasy (Quick and easy) Add an S to ick to form Sick
    ENTREE #4:
    Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form like a 3-letter word for where an animal can’t go if attached to a homophone of the altered third word. Where can’t the animal go? To what might the animal be attached?
    Answer:
    Far and tether (tar and feather)
    ENTREE #5:
    Think of a familiar three-word phrase with “and” in the middle (“___ and ___”). Switch the initial sounds of the first and third words and you’ll form the last names of a member of the Songwriters Hall of Fame and a quarterback who played in two Super Bowls. Who are they?
    Answer:
    (J.D.) Souther and (Bubby) Brister (brother and sister)

    Lexicographical Dessert:
    Words on the dictionary
    Name two words sometimes seen side-by-side on a dictionary. Rearrange 5 of the first word's 6 letters, then rearrange 4 of those same 6 letters to form two specific examples of the second word. What are the words on the dictionary?
    Answer:
    Random House; (Dorm, Manor)

    Lego!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I (and others on this site) feel that SENS is a equally good or better answer to sdb's fine and worthy puzzle. As to the "best" answer, I rest my case above.

      Maybe the worth of a puzzle is in the amount of discussion that it engenders, or the learning it implants.

      Delete
    2. geofan:

      You are quite right. I frequently say a good puzzle should provide some reward upon solving, and if it is didactic, well then it is great. I did not know of Sens before. Thanks for making Sens of my puzzle.

      Here is the email reply I received from WS in rejecting this puzzle for NPR:

      "Hi Mark,

      Thanks but regrets on this one. I wouldn't expect everyone to know how to pronounce "Reims." I certainly don't.

      But I appreciate the offer.

      --Will"

      I found it appalling to say the least.

      Delete
  48. I want you, all of you. I want to feel you inside me, deep inside me. I want you to tell me when you’re going to cum, hear you moan my name and fuck me harder. Click here and Check me out i am getting naked here ;)

    ReplyDelete