Friday, July 13, 2018

“No tanks for the fish, Bonito!” Stacks o’ stately flapjacks; “Waiter, there’s a Cy in my floop!” Driving Miss “Drafties”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1110 + 98) SERVED


Schpuzzle of the Week:
“No tanks for the fish, Bonito!”

Newt’s wife Bonito buys him a variety of exotic goldfish for his birthday. But he has no fish tank. “The fish are nifty,” Newt says, “but where am I supposed to put them... in the bathtub?” 
No, not in the bathtub. So, Newt goes out and buys a fish tank.
The maximum capacity of Newt’s new tank is a bit less than 25.25 gallons. Its depth, in whole-number inches, is half its length and twice its width. 
Express the tank’s capacity using two words that are identical except for their final letter. What are these words? 
What are the three dimensions of Newt’s new tank?

Appetizer Menu

Point Of Tipping Appetizer:
“Waiter, there’s a Cy in my floop!”

Name a two-syllable word for a worker who is customarily tipped, in two syllables. 
Spoonerize the this word (that is, interchange the beginning letter sounds of each syllable) to form two new words. The first word is as old as Creation; the second is a word formed less than a century ago. 
Change the vowel in the first word, then change it to a long instead of a short vowel sound. 
When spoken aloud the result will sound like a natural phenomenon that caused some excitation during the closing years of the 20th century.
Who is the tipped worker? 
What is the phenomenon? 

Yokes Sunny Side Up Appetizer:
Driving Miss “Drafties” 

Name two different words a wagon driver may shout out to tail-waggin’ draft animals. 
Replace the first letter in one word with the letter following it in the alphabet. 
“Yoke” this result to the other shouted-out word with a hyphen to name a “shout” that draft animals might make. 
What is this “shout”?


MENU

Riffing Off Shortz And Chaikin Slices:
Stacks o’ stately flapjacks

Will Shortz’s July 8th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, from Andrew Chaikin of the National Puzzlers’ League, reads:
The word PANCAKE has an unusual property. If you remove its last letter, you get a series of U.S. state postal abbreviations — PA, NC, and AK. Can you name a major city and state that both have this property? To solve this, first think of a state in which you can drop its last letter to leave a series of state postal abbreviations. Then find a major city in that state that also has this property. The city and state names have to be different. What city and state is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Chaikin Slices read: 
ENTREE #1:
The words for a nut and a berry, KOLA and ACAI share a somewhat unusual property. It is the same property shared by the words and phrases below – all for which we have given you clues, and some for which we have given you answers. (ANSWERS ARE GIVEN IN UPPERCASE AND IN PARENTHESES.)
Solve the clues for which we have not given you answers. Then explain what property all words and phrases in the answers share.
1. Software for Nintendo’s dual-screen gaming system (CD-ROM NDS DISK)
2. “Crosswordese” cheese (EDAM)
3. Website promoting bussing, boxing or bucks? (SMACK-A-ROO.COM)
4. Bishop Desmond, or what Desdemona might wear during a performance of the Othello Ballet Suite (TUTU)
5. “A” thing one makes that “mends” fences (6 letters)
6. Two-word phrase describing news that is not fake, not even a little (3 and 7 letters) 
7. Soap brand TV hosts and announcers told us not to touch (4)
8. Things that supposedly “justify” meanies’ means (4)
9. Like woolly mammoths (6)
10. Word preceding “arm saw” or “tires” (6)
11. Immanuel who wasn’t “with God”... or was he? (4)
12. Pasternak heroine (4)
13. A denomination in Islam that considers the book believed to be dictated to Muhammad by the archangel Gabriel as the only dependable religious text (8)
14.Character portrayed by a singer in the movie “Men in Black II”... and, no, the singer wasn’t Johnny Cash (6)
15. Biblical land west of Nod (4)
16. Biblical garments that sound like Walt Frazier and Willis Reed (6)

ENTREE #2:
Dr. Bunsen Honeydew is a Muppet character who has invented edible paper clips, a banana sharpener and an electric nose warmer. 
His last name is made up of two words, one after another, that are liquids: honey and dew. 
The last name of a person who has invented word puzzles is made up of a word that is a liquid followed by letters that can be rearranged to form a liquid.
Who is this puzzle inventor?

ENTREE #3:
The answers to the fifty clues below share something not-so-unusual in common. 
What is it?
Why are the clues in the order they are in?
And for those who are whizzes at quizzes...
What are the answers to all fifty clues?


1. A Baker by birth (at least according to the certificate)
2. About a dozen feet, a navigable river depth for a steamboat
3. Album created by Parsons 
4. Bizarre foodie celebrity chef born on the Fourth of July
5. “Breathing machine”
6. Catholic congregation outflow after a Sunday service
7. Colorful indication of a deficit
8. Companion to “unreachable star” and “unbeatable foe”
9. Description of Seurat, Van Gogh, Manet and Monet... that is made during the 19th Century, that is
10. Description of Silent treatments, subtle insults, sullenness, stubbornness and other such behavior
11. Emily Litella’s signature sign-off
12. Flexible radio wave receiver
13. Flower pot-hatted band’s hit
14. Foiler of a perfect test score
15. Football play in which both coaches send their “hands team” onto the field  
16. Golden Dome Home
17. Gray contents of a tray (along with brown butts)
18. Hangout for the “brutally handsome” and “terminally pretty”?
19. Hans Conried sitcom role  
20. Hole-in-one at Augusta, perhaps
21. Homered
22. Isaac falsely believing Jacob is Esau is an example of this literary plot device
23. Jubilant shout from salts too long at sea
24. “Look Ma, __ _____!” 
25. Nickname of the guy seen on a “double sawbuck
26. One way to make a sweater
27. One who refers to people as Lyin’ Ted, Little Marco, Crooked Hillary or Pocahontas, for example  
28. Part of a pool that sounds like a diaper brand
29. Part of Dodd-Frank that deals with “paying it back” 
30. Pelvic contusion
31. Philanderer
32. “Poor Young Country Boy” nurturer, according to the Fab Four
33. Precipitation that makes litmus testers see red 
34. Prized possession in the land of Helga braids, horned helmets and Skol  
35. Rainy Day do-re-mi
36. “Six” when written like this: “6”
37. Slash the price
38. Some alternative to which Bob Dylan may have been alluding when he sang “You don't need a meteorologist (sic) to know which way the wind blows” 
39. Someone dropped the ball again? What was the reason this time? 
40. Soul mate 
41. The “best ever written” “flawless work of art,” according to Faulkner and Dostoyevsky
42. There are eight pairs of these formed by a hashtag – half acute, half obtuse
43. Tony who is not in a cage but on a box 
44. Type of goggles used by guys with guns when suns go down
45. Unpremeditated observation
46. What may be observed at the beginning or end of the week
47. What victors once hurdled – a practice that seems to have gone the way of the wooden racket 
48. Wilbur or Fern... or many Carolinians’ source of printed news
49. Woo
50. You can see his mug on a fin 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

47 comments:

  1. Happy Friday everyone! Looks like I'm the first to comment again this week! I hope everyone else is OK. I know this week's edition of P! was a little late. I expected it to appear last night around 2:00 or 3:00, but it didn't. Is everything all right, Lego? So far I've got the Appetizers, all of Entree #1 except 6 and 13, and all of #3 except 2, 5, 7, 9, 12, 14-17, 20-23, 26, 29, 30, 34-36, 39, 42, and 44-47. I hope I'm not giving anything away by saying this, knowing what the 50 parts of #3 represent, but a few of the answers seem like they may repeat, and most likely they're not supposed to. I know I've seen a few whose possible answers, if I'm actually right, would be of much interest to me(though of course I won't explain that until later). Hope you can help clear things up with a few good hints, Lego! I also hope I won't be the only one posting here until Wednesday! Surely I should be hearing from the rest of you soon!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cranberry,
      Yes, In Entree #3, the answers are not supposed to repeat. You are correct. I made the puzzle much more difficult (on Thursday as I was polishing this entree) by puting the clues in the order they are now in. The order they were in originally would have made solving it much easier.
      But because the second Appetizer seems kinda easy, and the first one seems reasonably solvable also I felt justified to make one of the entrees a bit tougher to chew on.
      I will work on a few hints during the weekend.

      LegoFeelingFlatAsAFlapjackAfterCookingUpThoseFiftyClues

      Delete
  2. Oh, you JUSt beat me to it, pjb!! When I hit "NO comments" yours was not there yet, and so I thought I'd prevent your feeling 'lonely' like last week! HA...missed it by a split second!

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was chugging along nicely (LOVE math puzzles), although I'm not SURE I have the correct two words (one of them HAS to be correct, even if not what you intended), and the two Appetizers, and then hit the Entrees. OUch.

    While I could come up with answers for Entree #1's 10 through 14, even if I do get some more, I am failing to see the 'property' we are supposed to find.

    I've worked through the first 15 or so of Entree #3 (skipping a few), but STILL fail to ascertain the property, or know why the specific order. WEll, I should add that I THOUGHT I might have found a property, but then some of my answers thus far don't fit it. Perhaps THEY are wrong?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am gratified that you chugged right through the Schpuzzle of the Week, ViolinTeddy. As usual, I look forward to your answer, be it my intended or not.
      I should try to mix more math puzzles into the Puzzleria! mix. I do have a few more ready to go, but I will also commit to spending a greater percentage of my time and energy to compose even more.

      LegoChuggingLikeTheLastSteamEngineTrainToFillHis"FishTank"WithPuzzles

      Delete
  4. Oh, I believe I was on the right track for Entree 3 after all....lots to go, though

    ReplyDelete
  5. Having spent (wasted?) HOURS on Entree 3, at this point, I am down to being stuck on clues 21, 29, 35, and 49. Of course, if there are any errors (which is certainly possible, given that I've changed some already), that might well affect the unanswered clues. You'd think I could get 'homered', not to mention "woo", but no such luck.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT,
      "Homered" and "Woo" are two of the toughest clues to`solve.
      The answer to "Homered" contains two 4-letter words. The second is a unit of measurement.
      The answer to "Woo" is even tougher. The singular form of the second word is familiar to fans of opera. A piece of music with that word in the title is familiar to fans of early TV westerns.
      #29: The answer contains a word and a numeral, and is similar to a recent Puzzleria! puzzle title.
      #35: The answer includes an ingredient in a cake-baker's kitchen and a word associated with Matryoshka (or Babushka) dolls.

      LegoSaysThatAnyTimeSpentOnAPuzzleIsTimeWellWasted

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the hints, Lego. I did manage to come up with #29. And possibly HALF of "homered" and half of #35, but I'm not actually sure. Things very well might NOT work out given the possibilities I have left.

      Delete
  6. I'm pretty confident about my Math score on the Schpuzzlastic Aptitude Test. The Verbal part is another matter.

    The Appetizers were easy enough.

    I have a lot of the answers for #1, but no idea about the property.
    No idea for #2.
    I have the property for #3, and the ordering principle, but not all answers.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul,
      "Schpuzzlastic Aptitude Test..." Love it!
      Thank you for confirming my suspicion about the facility of the Appetizers.
      ROSACS:
      #1: The property is a slight twist on the property in Will Shortz's challenge.
      #2. I was not aware of the "person who has invented word puzzles" until very recently.
      #3. If you get ALL the answer, you are truly a quiz whiz!

      LegoAddsThatHebrewScriptures(OldTestament)IsAClueToTheVerbalPartOfTheSchpuzzlasticAptitudeTest

      Delete
  7. By the way, as has sometimes happened, as I was trying to fall asleep in the wee hours, the 'property' for Entree #1 suddenly hit me! Now I'll see if I can get anywhere with all the other numbers.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I now have all the parts of #3 except 2, 5, 15, 20, 21, 29, 30, 36, and 39. Still pretty tough, IMHO. Any more hints, Lego?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ENTREE #3 Hints:
      2. Perhaps it's a "Moon River" depth, my friend.
      5. I run long puzzles like this one, but give only short hints.
      15. This play, like a Hail Mary pass, has a pretty low rate of success.
      20. Draining a 90-foot putt would also qualify, as would any superior shot at this storied tourney.
      21. You might have to break out the baseball slang books for this one.
      29. What the Steelers captured at '79 at the Orange Bowl, and the numeral appearing on their rings
      30. Sam Malone once rapped about something similar, and nearby.
      36. “6”, if you fill in the inside with solid ink, looks a bit like a big upside-down apostrophe,
      39. Usually when someone drops the ball (in baseball, for instance) there is booing. In this instance, however, there is revelry and even kissing!

      LegoYells"HeyThere'sNoKissingInBaseball!"

      Delete
  9. 5, 20, and 36 left. I just hope I have the right answers for all I do have! I may need a few more hints(possibly a few for 23, 26, 31, 46, and 49 as well, as I'm unsure about them). And what about the Schpuzzle and 6 and 13 from Entree #1?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hints:
      5. The machine, though nearly obsolete, smacks a bit of an MRI
      20. Word in the title track of a Metallica album/any one member of a 21st century NYC garage rock band
      36. ...But what if you don't fill in the inside of the "6" with solid ink...?
      23. One of the words is the word Al Bell thought would be the initial response a fellah would mouth upon picking up the telephone receiver
      26. You'll need needles!
      31. Chistmas gifts might lie upon it/a quaff of beer, after the harder stuff
      46. Christians, at the beginning; Jews, at the end
      49. This was something Pete Townsend could do... look at the title track of "Tommy," for example.
      Schpuzzle: The two words are 5 letters long.
      I made a mistake in my wording the penultimate question ought to read:
      Express the tank’s capacity using two words that are identical except for "their FINAL LETTER," not "their FEW FINAL LETTERS." Mea Culpa!
      Again, think Old Testament, specifically Genesis.
      ENTREE #1
      6. The 3-letter word is a homophone of a leather-piercing tool; the 7-letter word rhymes with "satisfacatual" in a song.
      13. Use the non-apostrophied spelling of the Islamic book, then add a suffix.

      LegoAdmitsThereIsNotOneHintillaOfEvidenceThatThesePuzzlesAreEasy

      Delete
  10. I've got them all, even though some of the 50 may not be worded exactly right. I'm sure they'd still be acceptable, according to their connection. I did my best. As far as the math part of the Schpuzzle, I don't think I can get that. I suppose you could give me a hint, but I'm not any good at math or logic puzzles.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Your hint, happily, gave me #6 of Entree #1, however, I still have no answers for #5, 8 or 16 of that Entree.

    Fascinatingly (to me, at least) is that my Schpuzzle words are 5 and SIX letters long, although I'm sure I know what your intended second 5-letter one is. I will keep my six-letter answer, as I know it is relevant.

    Having consulted a number of lists, FINALLY FINALLY just now, I worked out the 21 (homered)answer! And it even fit what I had left, so I know it's correct. YIPPEEEEE! Still haven't gotten anywhere with 35 and 49, though, despite all the various hints.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. More Hints:
      ViolinTeddy, It will be fascinating for me also to see your 5- and 6-letter solution to the Schpuzzle.)
      Congrats on cracking ENTREE #3, Number 21. (You are becoming a sports expert!)
      35. Breakfast for a fox, squirrel, snake or raccoon with pangs in theie bellies and robbin' on their minds?
      49. Add a letter to the first name of the spouse of one of the answers to this week's NPR challenge + Carnival, Cuban and Coriolan = the answer!
      Entree #1:
      5. Take approvals heard during a church service. Add one letter to get this answer.
      8. Simplify it: Just answer "What justifies the means?"
      16. Try it this way: Biblical garments that sound like a melody and informal expressions of disgust (6)

      LegoMy...

      Delete
    2. HA...sports expert, that'll be the day! I just lucked out, at long last, in my list-looking, and knowing what the initial of the first word SHOULD be.

      THank you for the Entree 1 hints. I have them now, and 5 and 8 were easier than I would have thought! As in, DUH! I'd HAD the last 2/3 of #16, but never put the first 1/3 on it.

      Am still wrestling with Entree 3's #35. Everything I try doesn't meet the requirements of the ORIGINAL description, let alone all the different hints.

      And it took me LONG enough, but I finally solved the NPR puzzle, and then could employ your hint above for #49. AT LAST...but I had the wrong (initials) left, so now I have to go fix a different answer somehow. However, I DID come up (and will leave it attached) with a totally different 49 answer, which WOULD match what I had left.

      Delete
    3. VT,
      ENTREE #35:
      Album title by a guy rooted in #1.

      LegoWhoIsWorkingOnADreamBlogForThisFriday

      Delete
    4. I'm amused to tell you, LegoWorking..., that as so often happens, when I wasn't trying to figure out 35, I finally got it. [But NOT due to this latest hint, which I'm now going to look up and see what guy you mean.] I realize that I had never interpreted the INITIAL clue properly!

      There had been so many additional hints, which never seemed to solidify into anything that made sense, when suddenly...BOOM. Turns out, I had been down to using the WRONG you-know-what, which is what had definitely helped to throw me offtrack.

      The trouble is NOW, I have to change my answer for #36, as well as suspecting that I haven't had the correct words for #12 or #39 all along. So round and round I go....

      Delete
    5. Duh, 39 just made sense, and fortunately, I had the proper initials for it still remaining.

      Delete
    6. VT,
      12. Something you might crack + something a bug might have
      36. ...And 7 is an upside-down L, at least in the Land Of Light Emitting Diode Displays.

      7360...

      Delete
    7. Well, 7360 (or should it have been 7390?), clearly my CREATIVE answers that I finally settled upon in desperation for 12 and 36 are NOT in the ballpark of correct. Back to the drawing board....

      Delete
    8. VT,
      Yes, 7390 is LEGO, whereas 7360 is LEgO. Good point!
      12. It's on your car.
      36. What is another word for "upside-down"?

      7390...

      Delete
    9. I do get what the second word is for #12...it's just that it means that I am again WRONG on some other answer, as it's not an initial I have left. Still having trouble with the first word, though, as I have NO Idea which switch I need to make, i.e. what initial I need.

      No matter what I try, I am constantly left with the same two sets of initials for which no answer ever seems to apply.

      Delete
  12. Something you might crack? It appears the word I used is incorrect. I might also have the wrong word for 36 as well. Any chance you could clear it up a little bit more for me too, Lego? All I can really say without giving too much away(perhaps)is that I have the right initials for both words.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. For "something you might crack" ... it follows a dessert topping with "Dream..." or "Cool..."
      36. What's a synonym for "upside-down" beginning with a vowel?

      LegoSaysYouCanAlsoCrackWalnutsKnucklesCases...

      Delete
    2. Well, having nearly pulled the words out of you, LegoKnuckles, I have to say I had never HEARD of such a thing (for 12)....but NOW another answer I have is wrong. I give up!

      ALso, I figure I know the first word for 36 (with the vowel), but again, not the second word because once more, my two sets of initials that never get used don't qualify and I have no idea what OTHER answer now is wrong, to accommodate 36's first word. Sigh a thousand times.

      Delete
  13. PJB, I might have thought this was YOU, except it says he lives in Athens, GA.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/22/crosswords/who-made-my-puzzle.html

    ReplyDelete
  14. Jasper, AL has always been my home. There are two "Patrick Berry"s from the South who are into puzzles. The first time I had ever heard of the other I saw our name in my GAMES magazine I'd received in the mail. For some reason I thought since I was now subscribing to it, they had actually put my name in there for me to see it. I don't know why. Took me a while to realize if my name is in the byline, there had to be another PB(PDB in his case, I later found out)and he was actually a much better puzzler than I am. I can't even understand some of his to be able to solve them! But my mom and I love his "Rows Garden" puzzles. We do them together.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. cranberry,
      I can't believe PDB is "a much better puzzler than you are."

      LegoWhoBelievesPatrickJ.Berry'sPuzzlesAreSecondToNone

      Delete
  15. BTW now I have both 12 and 36, but considering what I have for 14, it appears to be the same initials. Knowing the significance of there being 50 parts, I've still definitely got something incorrect somewhere, but I don't know exactly where(and I hope you appreciate how much I'm trying to avoid saying either word I have for 14, as that would probably lead or mislead others still trying to solve it!). Got another good hint to help me out here, Lego?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. #14:
      Damn! I got one wrong!

      LegoWhoGetsALotOfStuffWrong

      Delete
    2. That is the exact number puzzle that I alluded to above, where I finally pinned down the correct answer for 12, but then had to change another one answer, meaning 14.

      But as I've said so often, my available set of initials (to ALSO avoid using the term) is not anything that could possibly be right for 14, and by now, I'm worn out.

      Delete
    3. Don't worry about it, Lego. If it were my puzzle, I probably would've made the same mistake. Trying to keep up with 50 of whatever-these-things-are at a time(like we don't already know by now anyway), you're bound to lose track of one or two. These things happen. If it'll make you feel better, I've come up with an alternative answer, and its initials will more than make up for the mistake. I'll reveal it later today. You'll be proud.

      Delete
    4. I believe, pjb, that Lego's last comment was the HINT for #14, not an admission of any goof on his part.

      Delete
    5. I don't know what to believe anymore!

      Delete
  16. SCHPUZZLE: D = 1/2 L; D = 2W; 25.5 gallons = a bit more than 5760 cubic inches in volume. VOLUME = L x W x D.
    Therefore, 5760 = L x W x D => 2D x D/2 x D => D cubed = 5760 => D = 18. Thus, L = 36, and W = 9. TANK IS A CUBIC CUBOID (though your answer is undoubtedly CUBIT)

    APPETIZER 1: BELLHOP => HELL and BOP => HALL BOP => HALE-BOPP COMET

    APPETIZER 2: GEE and HAW => HEE HAW

    ENTREE 1: All answers are collections of two or more BACKWARDS state abbreviations!
    1. CD ROM NDS DISK [ KS, ID, SD, NM, OR, DC]
    2. EDAM [MA, DE]
    3. SMACKAROO.COM [MO, CO, OR, AK, CA, MS]
    4. TUTU [UT, UT]
    5. AMENDS [SD, NE, MA]
    6. ALL FACTUAL [LA, UT, CA, FL, LA] (Thanks to hint)
    7. DIAL [AL, ID]
    8. ENDS [SD, NE] (That was easier than I had expected, post-hint)
    9. TUSKED [DE, KS, UT]
    10. RADIAL [LA, ID, AR]
    11. KANT [TN, AK]
    12. LARA [AR, LA]
    13. KORANISM [MS, IN, AR, OK]
    14. AGENT M [MT, NE, GA]
    15. EDEN [NE, DE]
    16. TUNICS [SC, IN, UT]

    ENTREE 2: NO IDEA. COuld find only Arthur WYNNE

    ENTREE 3: States: NJ MT GA AZ IL ME RI ID IA PA NM OR/WA WI WA/IA OK ND CA FL UT MA WY MI LA NC OH KY VT DE TX HI SC MN AR NH NE MS WV MO? KS AK VA CT NV IN TN SD CO MO AL
    BUt no matter what I do, I ALWAYS have OR and MD left over.

    1. NORMA JEAN [NJ]
    2. MARK TWAIN [MT]
    3. GRIEVOUS ANGEL [GA]
    4. ANDREW ZIMMERN [AZ]
    5. IRON LUNG [IL] (This was one of the easiest ones, IMHO, got it immediately.)
    6. MASS EXIT [ME]
    7. RED INK [RI]
    8. IMPOSSIBLE DREAM [ID]
    9. IMPRESSIONIST ARTISTS [IA] ???
    10. PASSIVE-AGGRESSIVE [PA]
    11. NEVER MIND [NM]
    12. OMNIDIRECTIONAL ROUTER???? [OR] Ok, it HAS to be ANTENNA (due to what BUGS can CARS have)... BUt I can't figure out which state, i.e. answer, to change to get a first word. Based, on latest hints: ======> "WHIP ANTENNA"? [WA} BUt then my #14 answer is wrong. I can't win.
    13. WHIP IT [WI]
    14. WRONG ANSWER [WA] Or could it be "INCORRECT ANSWER" ? [IA] But then my #9 is wrong. I'm going to scream!
    15. ONSIDE KICK [OK]
    16. NOTRE DAME [ND]
    17. CIGARETTE ASHES [CA]
    18. FAST LANE [FL]
    19. UNCLE TONOOSE [UT]
    20, MASTERS ACE [MA]
    21, WENT YARD [WY]
    22, MISTAKEN IDENTITY [MI]
    23, LAND AHOY [LA]
    24, NO CAVITIES [NC]
    25, OLD HICKORY [OH]
    26. KNIT YARN [KY]
    27. VINTAGE TRUMP [VT]
    28. DEEP END [DE]
    29. TITLE X [TX}
    30. HIP INJURY [HI]
    31. SKIRT CHASER [SC]
    32. MOTHER NATURE [MN]
    33. ACID RAIN [AR]
    34. NORWEGIAN HYDROPOWER [NH]
    35. NEST EGG [NE] (But HOW is this a do-re-mi?)
    36. INVERTED LETTER? BUt that would mean IRON LUNG would have to be wrong, which it can't be!! (And I originally HAD "NUMERAL EXPRESSION" for this answer, but the 'NE' had to go to Nest Egg. THen I chose "MAKE DIGIT", so as to use MD.]
    37. MAJOR SALE [MS]
    38. WORLD VIEW [WV]
    39. NEW YEARS [NY]
    40. KINDRED SPIRIT [KS]
    41. ANNA KARENINA [AK]
    42. VERTICAL ANGLES [VA]
    43. CEREAL TIGER [CT]
    44. NIGHT VISION [NV]
    45. IMPROMPTU NOTICE? [IN]
    46. SUN DAY [SD]
    47. THE NET [TN]
    48. CHARLOTTE OBSERVER [CO]
    49. MAKE OVERTURES [MO] (but I also came up with OVERT ROMANCE, since I had had only OR left at the time.)
    50. ABRAHAM LINCOLN [AL]

    ReplyDelete
  17. Schpuzzle
    CUBIC CUBIT
    Appetizer Part 1
    BELLHOP, HALE-BOPP(comet)
    Part 2
    GEE, HAW, HEE-HAW
    Menu/Riff-Offs
    Entree #1
    All the answers are made up of state postal abbreviations spelled backwards.
    1. CD-ROM NDS DISK(KS, ID, SD, NM, OR, DC)
    2. EDAM(MA, DE)
    3. SMACK-A-ROO.COM(MO, CO, OR, AK, CA, MS)
    4. TUTU(UT, UT)
    5. AMENDS(SD, NE, MA)
    6. ALL FACTUAL(LA, UT, CA, FL, LA)
    7. DIAL(LA, ID)
    8. ENDS(SD, NE)
    9. TUSKED(DE, KS, UT)
    10. RADIAL(LA, ID, AR)
    11. KANT(TN, AK)
    12. LARA(AR, AL)
    13. KORANISM(MS, IN, AR, OK)
    14. AGENT M(MT, NE, GA)
    15. EDEN(NE, DE)
    16. TUNICS(SC, IN, UT)
    Entree #2
    (Andrew)CHAIKIN(CHAI, INK)
    Entree #3
    The initials of each answer spell out a state postal abbreviation.
    1. NORMA JEAN(NJ, NEW JERSEY)
    2. MARIANA TRENCH(MT, MONTANA)
    3. GRIEVOUS ANGEL(GA, GEORGIA)
    4. ANDREW ZIMMERN(AZ, ARIZONA)
    5. IRON LUNG(IL, ILLINOIS)
    6. MASS EXIT(ME, MAINE)
    7. RED INK(RI, RHODE ISLAND)
    8. IMPOSSIBLE DREAM(ID, IDAHO)
    9. IMPRESSIONIST ARTISTS(IA, IOWA)
    10. PASSIVE AGGRESSIVE(PA, PENNSYLVANIA)
    11. NEVER MIND(NM, NEW MEXICO)
    12. WHIP ANTENNA(WA, WASHINGTON)
    13. WHIP IT(WI, WISCONSIN)
    14. MISSING ANSWER(MA, MASSACHUSETTS)
    If it was supposed to be WRONG ANSWER, which puts WASHINGTON in there twice, there would be no MASSACHUSETTS in the list(or at least, in my list). With my answer, MA is included, and it is totally possible because a MISSING ANSWER can also mar an otherwise perfect test score.
    15. ONSIDE KICK(OK, OKLAHOMA)
    16. NOTRE DAME(ND, NORTH DAKOTA)
    17. CIGARETTE ASHES(CA, CALIFORNIA)
    18. FAST LANE(FL, FLORIDA)
    19. UNCLE TONOOSE(UT, UTAH)
    20. MASTER STROKE(MS, MISSISSIPPI)
    21. WENT YARD(WY, WYOMING)
    22. MISTAKEN IDENTITY(MI, MICHIGAN)
    23. LAND AHOY(LA, LOUISIANA)
    24. NO HANDS(NH, NEW HAMPSHIRE)
    25. OLD HICKORY(OH, OHIO)
    26. KNITTING YARN(KY, KENTUCKY)
    27. NAME CALLER(NC, NORTH CAROLINA)
    28. DEEP END(DE, DELAWARE)
    29. TITLE X(TX, TEXAS)
    30. HERNIA ILIACUS(HI, HAWAII)
    31. SKIRT CHASER(SC, SOUTH CAROLINA)
    32. MOTHER NATURE(MN, MINNESOTA)
    33. ACID RAIN(AR, ARKANSAS)
    34. VIKING TREASURE(VT, VERMONT)
    35. NEST EGG(NE, NEBRASKA)
    36. INVERTED NUMBER(IN, INDIANA)
    37. MARK DOWN(MD, MARYLAND)
    38. WEATHER VANE(WV, WEST VIRGINIA)
    39. NEW YEAR(NY, NEW YORK)
    40. KINDRED SPIRIT(KS, KANSAS)
    41. ANNA KARENINA(AK, ALASKA)
    42. VERTICAL ANGLES(VA, VIRGINIA)
    43. CEREAL TIGER(CT, CONNECTICUT)
    44. NIGHT VISION(NV, NEVADA)
    45. OFF-THE-CUFF(or OFFHAND)REMARK(OR, OREGON)
    46. SABBATH DAY(SD, SOUTH DAKOTA)
    47. TENNIS NET(TN, TENNESSEE)
    48. CHARLOTTE OBSERVER(CO, COLORADO)
    49. MAKE OVERTURES(MO, MISSOURI)
    50. ABRAHAM LINCOLN(AL, ALABAMA)
    BTW at first I thought 5 was ARTIFICIAL LUNG, and I already had ABRAHAM LINCOLN for the last one, so I knew no abbreviation should be repeated.
    They call Alabama the Crimson Tide. Call me pjb.(Apologies to Steely Dan)




    ReplyDelete
  18. This week's answers for the record, part 1;

    Schpuzzle of the Week:
    “No tanks for the fish, Bonito!”
    Newt’s wife Bonito buys him a variety of exotic goldfish for his birthday. But he has no fish tank. “The fish are nifty,” Newt says, “but where am I supposed to put them, in the bathtub?”
    No. So, Newt buys a fish tank.
    The maximum capacity of Newt’s new tank is a bit less than 25.25 gallons. Its depth, in whole-number inches, is half its length and twice its width.
    Express the tank’s capacity using two words that are identical except for their few final letters. What are these words?
    What are the three dimensions of Newt’s tank?
    Answer: Cubic cubit;
    the tank is 18" deep by 36" long by 9" wide)

    Appetizer Menu

    Point Of Tipping Appetizer:
    “Waiter, there’s a Cy in my floop!”
    Name a two-syllable word for a worker who is customarily tipped, in two syllables.
    Spoonerize the this word (that is, interchange the beginning letters of each syllable) to form two new words: one as old as Creation; the other, a word formed less than a century ago.
    Change the vowel in the first part, then make it a long instead of a short vowel sound.
    When spoken aloud the result will sound like a natural phenomenon that caused some excitation during the closing years of the 20th century.
    Who is the tipped worker?
    What is the phenomenon?
    Answer:
    Bellhop;
    Hale-Bopp (Comet)

    Yokes Sunny Side Up Appetizer:
    Driving Miss “Drafties”
    Name two different words a wagon driver may shout to tail-waggin’ draft animals. Replace the first letter in one word with the letter following it in the alphabet. “Yoke” this result to the other shouted word with a hyphen to name a “shout” that draft animals might make. What is this “shout”?
    Answer:
    Hee-haw (Gee! Haw!)

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This week's answers for the record, part 1.5

      Riffing Off Shortz And Chaikin Slices:
      Stacks o’ stately flapjacks
      ENTREE #1:
      The words for a nut and a berry, KOLA and ACAI share a somewhat unusual property. It is the same property shared by the words and phrases below – all which we have given you clues for, and some which we have given you answers for.
      Solve for the clues we have NOT given you the answers to. Then explain what unusual property all words and phrases in the answers share.
      1. Software for Nintendo dual-screen gaming (CD-ROM NDS DISK)
      2. “Crosswordese” cheese (EDAM)
      3. Website promoting bussing, boxing or bucks? (SMACK-A-ROO.COM)
      4. Bishop Desmond, or what Desdemona might wear during a performance of the Othello Ballet Suite (TUTU)
      5. “A” thing one makes that “mends” fences (6 letters)
      6. Two-word phrase describing news that is not fake news, not even a little (3 and 7 letters)
      7. Soap brand some advertisers told us not to touch (4)
      8. Things that supposedly “justify” meanies’ means (4)
      9. Like woolly mammoths (6)
      10. Word preceding “arm saw” or “tires” (6)
      11. Immanuel who wasn’t “with God”... or was he? (4)
      12. Pasternak heroine (4)
      13. A denomination in Islam that considers the book believed to be dictated to Muhammad by the archangel Gabriel as the only dependable religious text (8)
      14.Character portrayed by a singer in “Men in Black II”... and, no, the singer wasn’t Johnny Cash (6)
      15. Biblical land west of Nod (4)
      16. Biblical garments that sound like Walt Frazier and Willis Reed (6)
      Answer:
      If you spell each answer in reverse you get a series of U.S. state postal abbreviations (and, in #1, also the postal abbreviation of Washington, D.C.).
      5. (AMENDS)
      6. (ALL FACTUAL)
      7. (DIAL)
      8. (ENDS)
      9. (TUSKED)
      10. (RADIAL)
      11. (KANT)
      12. (LARA)
      13. (KORANISM)
      14. (AGENT M)
      15. (EDEN)
      16. (TUNICS) (two Knicks; Reed and Frazier were Knicks teammates)
      ENTREE #2:
      Dr. Bunsen Honeydew is a Muppet character who has invented edible paper clips, a banana sharpener and an electric nose warmer. His last name is made up of two words, one after another, that are liquids: honey and dew.
      The last name of a person who has invented word puzzles is made up of a word that is a liquid followed by letters that can be rearranged to form a liquid.
      Who is this puzzle inventor?
      Answer:
      Andrew Chaikin of the National Puzzlers’ League, who submitted this week’s NPR challenge.
      Chai (tea) + ink = Chai + kin = Chaikin

      Lego...

      Delete
  19. This week's answers for the record, part 2:
    ENTREE #3:
    The answers to the clues below share something not-so-unusual in common. What is it?
    Answer:
    The two initial letters of each answer form the 50 state postal codes:
    1. A Baker by birth (at least according to the certificate)
    (Norma Jean; NJ, New Jersey)
    2. About a dozen feet, a navigable river depth for a steamboat
    (Mark Twain; MT, Montana)
    3. Album created by Parsons
    (Grievous Angel; GA, Georgia)
    4. Bizarre foodie celebrity chef born on the Fourth of July
    (Andrew Zimmern; AZ, Arizona)
    5. “Breathing machine”
    (Iron Lung; IL, Illinois)
    6. Catholic congregation outflow after a Sunday service
    (Mass Exodus; ME, Maine)
    7. Colorful indication of a deficit
    (Red Ink; RI, Rhode Island)
    8. Companion to “unreachable star” and “unbeatable foe”
    (Impossible Dream; ID, Idaho)
    9. Description of Seurat, Van Gogh, Manet and Monet... during the 19th Century, that is
    (Modern Artists; MA, Massachusetts)
    10. Description of Silent treatment, subtle insults, sullenness, stubbornness and other such behavior
    (Passive Aggressive; PA, Pennsylvania)
    11. Emily Litella’s signature sign-off
    (“Never Mind”; NM, New Mexico)
    12. Flexible radio wave receiver
    (Whip Antenna; WA, Washington)
    13. Flower pot-hatted band’s hit
    (“Whip It”; WI, Wisconsin)
    14. Foiler of a perfect test score
    (Incorrect Answer; IA, Iowa)
    15. Football play in which each coach sends his “hands team” onto the field
    (Onside Kick; OK, Oklahoma)
    16. Golden Dome Home
    (Notre Dame; ND, North Dakota)
    17. Gray contents of a tray (along with brown butts)
    (Cigar(ette) Ashes; CA, California)
    18. Hangout for the “brutally handsome” and “terminally pretty”? (Fast Lane; FL, Florida)

    ReplyDelete
  20. This week's answers for the record, part 3:

    19. Hans Conried sitcom role
    (Uncle Tonoose; UT, Utah)
    20. Hole-in-one at Augusta, perhaps
    (Master Stroke; MS, Mississippi)
    21. Homered
    (Went Yard; WY, Wyoming)
    22. Isaac falsely believing Jacob is Esau is an example of this literary plot device
    (Mistaken Identity; MI, Michigan)
    23. Jubilant shout from salts too long asea
    (“Land Ahoy!”; LA, Louisiana)
    24. “Look Ma, __ _____!”
    (No Hands; NH, New Hampshire)
    25. Nickname of the guy seen on a “double sawbuck”
    Old Hickory; OH, Ohio
    26. One way to make a sweater
    (Knit Yarn; KY, Kentucky)
    27. One who refers to people as Lyin’ Ted, Little Marco, Crooked Hillary or Pocahontas, for example
    (Name Caller; NC, North Carolina)
    28. Part of a pool that sounds like a diaper brand
    (Deep End; DE, Delaware)
    29. Part of Dodd-Frank dealing with “paying it back”
    (Title XIII; TX, Texas)
    30. Pelvic contusion
    (Hip Injury; HI, Hawaii)
    31. Philanderer
    (Skirt Chaser; SC, South Carolina)

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  21. This week's answers for the record, part 4:
    32. “Poor Young Country Boy” nurturer, according to the Fab Four
    (Mother Nature; MN, Minnesota)
    33. Precipitation that makes litmus testers see red
    (Acid Rain; AR, Arkansas)
    34. Prized possession in the land of Helga braids, horned helmets and Skol
    (Vikings Tickets; VT, Vermont)
    35. Rainy Day do-re-mi
    (Nest Egg; NE, Nebraska)
    36. “Six” when written like this: “6”
    (Inverted Nine; IN, Indiana)
    37. Slash the price
    (Mark Down; MD, Maryland)
    38. Some alternative to which Bob Dylan may have been alluding when he sang “You don't need a meteorologist (sic) to know which way the wind blows”
    (Weather Vane; WV, West Virginia)
    39. Someone dropped the ball again? What was the reason this time?
    (New Year; NY, New York)
    40. Soul mate
    (Kindred Spirit; KS, Kansas)
    41. The “best ever written” “flawless work of art,” according to Faulkner and Nabokov
    (Anna Karenina; AK, Alaska)
    42. There are eight pairs of these in a hashtag – half acute, half obtuse
    (Vertical Angles; VA, Virginia)
    43. Tony not in a cage but on a box
    (Cartoon Tiger; CT, Connecticut)
    44. Type of goggles used by guys with guns when suns go down
    (Night Vision; NV, Nevada)
    45. Unpremeditated observation
    (Offhand Remark; OR, Oregon)
    46. What may be observed at the beginning or end of the week
    (Sabbath Day; SD, South Dakota)
    47. What victors once hurdled – a practice that has gone the way of the wooden racket
    (Tennis Net, TN, Tennessee)
    48. Wilbur or Fern, or many Carolinians’ source of printed news
    (Charlotte Observer; CO, Colorado)
    49. Woo
    (Make Overtures; MO, Missouri)
    50. You can see his mug on a fin
    (Abraham Lincoln; AL, Alabama)

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
  22. Naruto season 6
     Naruto season 6: shippuden anime collection is directed by means of hayato date, and produced by using studio pierrot and television series. they're based on component ii of the masashi kishimoto series. 

    ReplyDelete