Friday, June 19, 2015

Literary "crittercism"; Re-seeding the final four; Frames of preference

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER e5 + 52  SERVED

Welcome to Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! We have long been rid of winter. We shall very shortly be rid of spring. It must be time for a “long” riddle and a “Shortz” riddle:

1. How is a season that many of us long for like a snake that many of us loathe?

2. What is the difference between the inspiration for the Frisbee and a possible inspiration for the bling given to the triumphant puzzle solvers of Will Shortz’s National Public Radio Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle?
 

Speaking of Dr. Shortz’s NPR puzzle, this was his offering this week:
Think of an adjective that describes many shampoos. Add the brand name of a shampoo in its basic form. The result, reading the letters in order from left to right, will name a famous musician. Who is it?
You can find the answer here or here.
 
We posted a “knock-off” puzzle (also known as a “piggyback” puzzle) to this NPR puzzle in the comments section of last week’s Puzzleria! We reprint it here, and will reveal the answer in a day or two in our comments section unless someone beats us to it:


Think of an adjective that describes some shampoos. Add the brand name of a shampoo. The result, reading the letters in order from left to right, is the last name of a not-at-all-very-famous musician and the name of a not-at-all-very-famous band in which he played bass.

What are the adjective and the shampoo? Who are the bassist and the band?

Hint: The adjective is also a cash crop. Removing one letter from the shampoo brand results in a deplorable word, a form of which appeared in the title of a Vladimir Nabokov novel.


Speaking of world-class “shampioonship” puzzle makers, we are treated this week to another bonus morsel baked up by our Master Gourmet French Puzzle Chef “Monsieur Garcon du Parachutisme,” also known as “skydiveboy,” and also known as Mark Scott of Seattle, Washington.

Bonus Every Pair Of Pictures Tells A Story Slice:
Frames of Preference
 







Which of these photos do you like best and why might they remind you of a popular entertainer of the past?

Who is it?

Hint: It is not anyone in the photos, nor is it anyone connected to a Wild West show.


Merci beaucoup, Monsieur. Another excellent serving of gourmet questionMarksmanship. And now, for a few servings of popular puzzling entertainment of the present, we present this weeks…

MENU
 
Unidentified Flying Creatures Slice:
Literary “crittercism”

Take the name of a well-known fictional character, in three syllables.


 The first syllable is a flying critter. The third syllable is a homophone of a flying critter. The second syllable, if you insert one of the letters of the word “second” within it, is the plural form of a flying critter.

Who is this fictional character? What are these critters?

Reversal Of Forenut Slice:
Re-seeding the final four

Reversing the order of the final four letters of certain words results in a different word. Two examples of five-letter words with this quality are “plate” and “sloop” (which become “petal” and “spool”).

Can you think of a six-letter word with this quality? We can think of one.


Can you think of words of more than six letters that have this quality? We can think of one. It has twelve letters.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzle -ria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Tuesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

99 comments:

  1. All I have so far is your second riddle.

    For a third riddle, what is the difference between a snake and an item of clothing for conjoined twins?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David,
      I don’t think this is your riddle answer, but the best I can do begins with, “A snake has no legs, but…”
      Am I anywhere near on the right track?

      Lego(Riddlee)ScottNoIdeaWhatTheAnswerToDavid’sRiddleIs!

      Delete
    2. I don't think so.

      How about a fourth riddle as a clue? Take a fictional TV character (last name). Change a vowel sound to get something that sounds like an item of clothing for conjoined twins (of the opposite sex from the third riddle).

      Delete
    3. Okay, for a fifth riddle. I mathematical term (plural) could also be a description of the conjoined twins from the fourth riddle, in certain circumstances.

      Delete
  2. All I have so far is Nelson Riddle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Word Woman,
      Who was Dudley Do-Right Jr.?
      That is the Nelson Riddle!
      LegoMountieBank

      Delete
    2. Lego:
      Do you mean the Nelson Riddle Orchestra? Or the Orca striation that groovy whales sometimes exhibit?

      Delete
    3. skydiveboy,
      Yes, that…
      … or the result when the Hollywood Catering Service underestimates the amount of food to bring to the set of the filming of a major motion picture.

      LegoPhilHarmonic...a

      Delete
    4. Yes, there is a colonel of truth in that. Especially if it is fried chicken.

      Delete
  3. I have only the Frisbee answer, too. Which was originally called a Pluto Platter, but got demoted, I guess, and flew off in search of New Horizons.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jan,
      Thanks for the Pluto link.
      Pluto Platter would have been a pretty good name for the Frisbee, given the Disney canine character. After all, “Frisbee” conjures images of pooches soaring through the air and jaw-snatching disks from mid-air (see images above).

      … Although eventually, “Pluto Platter” would have been shortened to “Pluter.”

      Pluto Platter

      LegoParkePluterBaugh:PlatterCritic

      Delete
  4. The picture puzzle has me thinking of Nikita Khrushchev, in a roundabout sort of way.

    I have two answers for ROFS, but each requires a proper noun (place name). I was almost ready to claim a third answer, until I double-checked to see if the second word must be different from the first. Indeed, it must.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Paul:
      I see what you mean. Disneyland has never allowed Nikita Khrushchev or buffalo to enter and enjoy their facility. Not very inclusive are they?

      Delete
    2. Paul,
      “Khrushchev’s due at IdleWild West Show?”

      For the ROFS, proper nouns would be perfectly proper answers. But so are improper nouns proper answers. My six-letter and twelve-letter answers happen to be lowercase and improper, but uppercase and proper also works.

      LegoWildEasternBlocShowdown

      Delete
    3. Paul:
      I forgot to mention that Trigger, although not refused entry, never visited Disneyland either. He was just too stuffed to walk in.

      Delete
    4. Lego:
      I want to hear more about those proper nuns and the improper nuns. Do they ever co-mingle? Or perhaps comb in a gale? You can tell my ignorance on this subject, but I really am interested in knowing. I don't mean knowing the nuns in a biblical way, you understand, I trust.

      Delete
    5. skydiveboy,

      Sure, Disneyland may never have allowed Nikita Khrushchev into their puny little amusement park, but they did let Mickeyta Khrushchev in.

      As for your sincere nun inquiry:
      Once in a blue moon proper nuns might get prepositioned. When this occurs, some make it a habit to remove all their articles of garb (even including their wimples!). Conjunction enSues (or enKatherines or enElizabeths, depending on the name of the nun). Such adverbse and abjective behavior is not tolerated, of course. The Mother Superior will normally pronouns these now-improper nuns unfit for their habit, and they will be promptly interjected from the convent.

      Their avowels of chastity were apparently a sham. These improper nuns were not consonant with the obligations of their sacred calling.

      LegoGetTheeOuttaOurNunnery!

      Delete
    6. That is indeed a frocking shameful story. How were you able to uncover it? You must know cellular life more than I. It is so black and white, with no grey area at all. I confess to not fully picturing it and its naked truth.

      Delete
  5. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. patjberry,

      Excellent puzzle. As I have noted before over on Blaine's blog, you have the puzzle knack.

      It is 3:30 in the morning Central Time. Very few people have noticed your puzzle as of yet. I believe this is exactly the kind of puzzle Will Shortz salivates over. If I were you I would delete it from this comments section and submit it to NPR.

      I really do appreciate that you posted it here on this blog though. This is exactly the spirit I want to foster at Puzzleria! -- a clearinghouse where puzzlers come to exchange ideas, puzzles, alternative answers, opinions, etc.

      Thank you.

      LegoGrateful

      Delete
  6. I've got skydiveboy's picture puzzle, though I almost didn't recognize the cowboy without his pretty woman by his side.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. jan,
      Congrats to you for solving it, and you are right about him not having his woman there with him, but he has his boyfriend there to support him.

      Delete
    2. skydiveboy and jan,
      In researching the “Nelson Riddle” (see my response to Word Woman, above), I discovered that Dudley Do-Right’s gal, Nell Fenwick, was enamored more with Dudley’s horse, Horse, than with Dudley! I hope there was no similar romantic/rohorse-ic triangle involving Roy, Dale and Trigger (with Buttercup the odd horse out).

      LegoNellDoneHerManWrong,HisHorseRight

      Delete
    3. Lego,
      Mounties were not allowed to be married back then. Perhaps that may explain the close relationships Mounties had with their steeds, and maybe this was a love triangle. You could contact the Canadian consul and put in for a Freedom of Information request, but it probably would come redacted. Monty Python discovered a similar situation with Canadian lumberjacks as I remember.

      Delete
    4. Half-Nelson

      Other Half-Nelson.

      Delete
    5. I've written the following somewhere before, but I'm sure this is at least a partial new audience.

      Contrary to popular belief, when Trigger died, Roy Rogers did not have Trigger preserved by a taxidermist. Rather, he had Trigger turned into horse jerky, which he passed out to the neighborhood children on Halloween. When the children asked what it was, he said "Trigger Treat".

      Delete
    6. E-qwhining here, David. That is really bad.

      Delete
    7. Word Woman,

      There is no e-qwhining in base-humor-ball! David’s pun was so groanable that it was grinnable.
      Like the Great American Pastime’s Jimmy Foxx and Ducky Medwick (not to be confused with Nell Fenwick or Park Fenway) and quarter horse American Pharoah, David’s “Trigger Treat” was a true Triple Crown whinnyer.

      LegoTroisEasyRestsTheHeadThatWearsTheTripleCrown

      Delete
    8. You are often horsing around, jockeymen, fruits of the loam.

      Delete
    9. Or, we are often horsing around, jokeymen, fruits of the lame.

      LegoTheyShootHorses,Don’tThey?

      Delete
    10. Hey, you get to edit, Lego. Well-done, sire.

      Delete
  7. Just got the Flying Critters one....but I don't think there'll be much hope for the "Final Four", not to mention any of the others....no time, I'm afraid. But very nice to have dropped in, albeit briefly.

    ReplyDelete
  8. As a lover of awful groan-inducing puns, I have to say I love the "Trigger Treat" joke! Still haven't got the flying critter puzzle though. It was enough just getting the Sunday puzzle. I do have an answer for the second puzzle though. Tell ya Tuesday.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I agree, the Trigger joke is a treat. Who can say David doesn't have the right stuff? Lighthearted humor like that kinda makes my saddle soar.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Would that be the saddle on General Grant's horse, SDB?

    ReplyDelete
  11. For ROFS, I have 2 sixes and 1 seven. One of the sixes and the seven share the same reversed letters.

    I don't have the BEPOPTASS or UFCS but do have a piggyback UFCS:
    Take a no longer living person, well known (at least among this crowd), 3 syllables. The first and second syllable sounds like (different) flying creatures, the third syllable sounds like a flying creature without the first and last letter. The removed letters are the initials of a comic strip character.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David,

      I have been working on the "third, fourth and fifth riddles" you posted at the beginning of this week's comments, and on your "flying creature puzzle," above.

      Can you (or some other Puzzlerian! who has solved your puzzles) provide a bit of hintage? I know, David, that you created your fourth and fifth puzzles to serve as hints to the third puzzle, but I just cannot crack them.

      In you flying creature puzzle, it would help me if you revealed how the the syllables are distributed in the person's name, or if you narrowed down the comic strip character somewhat.

      Thank you a ton for posting your great puzzles in our comments section. They are a real challenge... to me at least.

      LegoThereAreNOTFewLessCluelessThanI

      Delete
  12. We can start with a hint or two for the flying creatures. First, the comic strip character is always referred to by his/her initials. Second, the real life person is a one syllable first name / two syllable second name.

    ReplyDelete
  13. If you are saying, oh PuzzleMaster (and David) that the answer to the flying critters puzzle is a cartoon character, than I have a completely DIFFERENT answer.....but I won't be around to type it in tomorrow. Nuts.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Oh, perhaps I was confused, in that I didn't see above that David had posed a different flying critters puzzle, and it is his that has a cartoon character, not Lego's. Right? (Tearing hair out)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Right, and my actual character is non-fictional.

      Delete
  15. David, I just got your puzzle, but I still can't get Lego's. David should submit his to NPR, if you ask me. I 'll still reveal the answer to mine tomorrow, in case anyone might be having trouble with it after seeing it briefly here.

    ReplyDelete
  16. The answer to Lego's first puzzle just hit me. It's great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your post, which I just read a moment ago, led me to take a look, and I think I too have the answer, and it is clever. Reminds me of one of the Pink Panther movies.

      Delete
    2. David,
      Your hints were enough to help me solve your clever flying creatures puzzle. The “no longer living person” lived not much longer than age 31. I agree with patjberry that it is an NPR-worthy puzzle. I am yet making no headway on your conjoined twins riddles, however.

      patjberry,
      Thanks for your kind word about my “Literary Crittercism” puzzle. If you are planning to send your “deleted-post” puzzle to NPR, however, I would hold off on giving the answer until you are sure NPR is not going to use it.

      LegoInSolvingMode

      Delete
  17. It is about time we reveal the answer to our “piggyback puzzle” to last week’s “herbal Pert = Herp Alpert” puzzle: Our puzzle read:

    Think of an adjective that describes some shampoos. Add the brand name of a shampoo. The result, reading the letters in order from left to right, is the last name of a not-at-all-very-famous musician and the name of a not-at-all-very-famous band in which he played bass.
    What are the adjective and the shampoo? Who are the bassist and the band?
    Hint: The adjective is also a cash crop. Removing one letter from the shampoo brand results in a deplorable word, a form of which appeared in the title of a Vladimir Nabokov novel.

    Answer:
    Adjective = wheat;
    Shampoo = Bed Head;
    Bassist = Kris Wheat
    Band = Bedhead
    Hints: Wheat is a cash crop, worldwide.
    Bed Head – d = behead

    LegoLatherRinseSpitSpinLatherRinseSpinSpitLather…

    ReplyDelete
  18. ATTENTION PUZZLERIANS!
    PLEASE do NOT reveal today your answers to skydiveboy’s dual picture puzzle, Bonus Every Pair Of Pictures Tells A Story Slice: Frames of Preference.

    We want to give solvers a bit more time to solve it. We will let you know when it is okay to post your solution.

    Thank you.
    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  19. I thought jan had already revealed the answer (if I hadn't), but, all right, if that's the way you want it ...

    Moriah / mohair
    Angola / analog

    Does the name Jiro Hemmi mean anything to anyone?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I don't think this gives much away ... and it's a great clip:
      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FNCzfPhdd2M

      Delete
  20. I have been out of town for the last week with no access to a computer. I saw the slices just now for the first time. I do have some comments about ROFS:

    Words with palindromic final four letters: INDEED, GROTTO, OUTTOOT, OVERSEES, SUPERKOOK.

    Words with non-palindromic final four letters: REWARD/REDRAW, PISTOL/PILOTS, OUTSPOT (in a card game)/OUTTOPS, OVERSTEP/OVERPETS, SUPERSTAR/SUPERRATS!

    just preliminary thoughts...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. ron,
      Welcome back from your vacation. Please tell us how Edward Snowden is doing over there.

      Delete
    2. Now it does.

      Excellent pair of 6-letter solutions for “Re-seeding the final four,” Paul. Not my intended but, of course, that is why they are excellent!

      A biblical reference like Moriah is always solid. Its re-seeded partner, mohair, is fabric or yarn made from the hair of an ANGORA goat. Angora re-seeded would be ANAROG, as in anarog computers or digit displays… Oh, wait, that should be anaLog computers or digit displays, which re-seeds to Angola.

      ron,
      A quite impressive array of re-seedings, given your compressed solving time frame. You have still more time before “This week’s answers, for the record,” and I believe skydiveboy is postponing the reveal of his picture-puzzle answer.

      LegoARe-seedingMohairLineIsMt.Baldy,Moriah…But a BowlHaircutIsAMoeHairCut

      Delete
    3. lego,
      Glad you enjoyed my slipstick comedy.

      Delete
    4. David,

      Slipstick… slapstock, slapdash, slap-happy, shrink-wrapped, snoop-dogg-rapped, spellbound, homespun, pun-packed, fun-facted, slam-dunked, punch-drunk, spiked-punched, spleen-vented, fiddy-cented, spit-shined, belt-notched, punch-line-botched, spot-on, off-color, on-topic, off-kilter, unfiltered, slam-bang, slam-bam, thank you ma’am, knee-slap, slipshod, shakedown, shears-sharp, shock-jock, shotgun, showdown, slow-down, downbeat, up-tempo, shorthand, show-off, slap-down, poetry-slam, shopworn, slack-jawed, sleep-inducing, yuk-producing…

      Any humor, Paul, that you contribute to this blog is as welcome as the flowers in May.

      LeGoCrazyUpsyDaisy

      Delete
    5. It seems I may have missed something. I don't mind.

      Delete
    6. Paul,
      You missed something?! Doesn't seem to me you miss much. Does seem to me I do, though.

      LegoCouldWinTheMissUniversePageantWereItNotForTheSwimsuitCompetition

      Delete
    7. ... and I do mind!

      LegoI'mSureMyParentsWishedIWouldHaveMindedThemMore

      Delete
    8. ron,
      Will you please solve skydiveboy's puzzle, already, so we can put a wrap on this?

      Delete
  21. I had REWARD/REDRAW also, which I paired with OUTWARD/OUTDRAW. CASTER/CARETS. Also, sort of RESORT/RETROS.

    ReplyDelete
  22. Replies
    1. David,
      Nice re-seedings. Reward/redraw is my six-letter answer. Your “outdraw/outward” is perfect. I couldn’t come up with any seven-letter solutions. Your four other six-letter solutions are all very solid also, including “retros,” IMO (“Retros” is also shorthand for “retrorockets.”)

      One of the words in my 12-letter solution is related to food. I would be delighted if one of you would come up with my answer. But, after all, Puzzlerians! have had only four-or-so days to come up with solutions. I started working on this puzzle more than a year ago!

      …assort/Astros
      Colt Forty-five/Colt Forty-evif (a pistol/Pilots… Seattle variety)

      LegoResortingToRetrospection

      Delete
    2. I'm suddenly curious about the etymology of the phrase 'heavenly days'.

      Delete
    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
    4. Paul,

      I am still trying to plumb the depth of meaning of Happy Days, and then Eve Plumb the depth of meaning of, well, you know

      LegoUnhappilyHellyNights

      Delete
  23. Haven't heard back from NPR about using any of my submissions. Might as well tell you the answer to my last piggyback puzzle is BEHEMOTH, using BEE and MOTH. I might be doing something wrong submitting mine. Last time I checked the inbox it said something about security breaches. I deleted what I needed to, though. I also think I misunderstood the second puzzle. I was trying to think of a six-letter word whose last FIVE letters could be reversed to make a new word. The best I could come up with was REVILE and RELIVE. As for the 12-letter word, if it's only the "final four", it just came to me as I've been writing this. Hope I'm right!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Any friend of a behemoth is a friend of mine. I may have suggested, once upon a time, that a behemoth could never have evolved; I'm not sure.

      Delete
    2. The Behemoth Radio Hour must be even bigger than NPR's The Moth Radio Hour. Here is the link: themoth.org/radio As for me, I'm still upset over the removal of all the elephants from the Seattle Woodland Park Zoo due to a lack of trunk space.

      Delete
    3. Paul, behemoths evolved with beshemoths, I believe.

      Delete
  24. This week’s answers, for the record:

    (The answer to our piggyback puzzle to Will Shortz’s NPR “Shampoo/Musician” puzzle in in our June 23 at 1:33 AM comment, above.)
    TWO RIDDLES:
    1. How is a season that many of us long for like a snake that many of us loathe?
    Answer: One is the summer (one who sums), the other is the adder (one who adds).

    2. What is the difference between the inspiration for the Frisbee and a possible inspiration for the bling given to the triumphant puzzle solvers of Will Shortz’s National Public Radio Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle?
    Answer:
    One is a pie tin, the other is a tiepin.
    The inspiration for the Frisbee was most likely a PIE TIN. And a possible inspiration for the treasured NPR lapel pin, the bling given to the triumphant puzzle solvers of Will Shortz’s National Public Radio Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, is the tiepin , which is more functional than a lapel pin. (Indeed, let’s face it, the only reason Will and the NPR call it a “lapel pin” is because women seldom wear ties, yet women often solve Will’s puzzles!)

    Unidentified Flying Creatures Slice:
    Literary “crittercism”
    Take the name of a well-known fictional character, in three syllables.
    The first syllable is a flying critter. The third syllable is a homophone of a flying critter. The second syllable, if you insert one of the letters of the word “second” within it, is the plural form of a flying critter.
    Who is this fictional character? What are these critters?

    Answer:
    Jay Gatsby (of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s “The Great Gatsby”)
    Critters:
    First syllable: “jay”
    Second syllable: gats + n = “gnats”
    Third syllable: The “by” in “Gatsby” is pronounced as a homophone of “bee.”

    Reversal Of Forenut Slice:
    Re-seeding the final four
    Reversing the order of the final four letters of certain words results in a different word. Two examples of five-letter words with this quality are “plate” and “sloop” (which become “petal” and “spool”).
    Can you think of a six-letter word with this quality? We can think of one.
    Can you think of words of more than six letters that have this quality? We can think of one. It has twelve letters.

    Answer:
    Six-letter word: reward (redraw)
    Twelve-letter word: delicatessen (delicateness)

    Lego…

    ReplyDelete
  25. Should I tell you a clue for my conjoined twin series? Oh wait, I just did.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. David,
      As a Minnesotan, home of the Twin Cities, I know this should be easy for me, but so far it is not. Does you clue have anything with baseball? Or Ernie Banks?

      LegoInTheHoleOhAndTwo

      Delete
    2. No, it is has to do with the television character in what I called the fourth riddle.

      Delete
    3. David,

      Sorry to be so dense. I know if I can “tip” just one of your riddles, the others should fall like dominoes.

      I have been looking for a character in a series with twins. I tried “Full House.” No luck with the vowel-sound shift leading to clothing. The “Patty Duke Show” wasn’t really a “twin series.” I’m not up to snuff on more modern TV series.

      I need another nudge, either from you or a Puzzlerian! who has solved your triple-riddle!

      LegoBaffled

      Delete
    4. Have my clues been Greek to you? Or even just British English?

      Delete
    5. Yes. Yes.
      Twin series: Royals?
      LegoFeelsStu-pidWhenStum-ped

      Delete
    6. Last clue for me to TELL Youse. It will SAVe A Lot A youSe time and effort.

      Delete
    7. Give the man a lollipop. . .or two.

      Delete
    8. Okay,
      I have your third and fourth riddle, after your merciful putting-me-outta-my-misery [Brit-TV-is-his-first-name, Stupid!] clue. That third domino (fifth riddle) is not falling though, unless "tripod" is a mathematical term.

      Great riddles, David.

      LegoSheepishLambda

      Delete
    9. Trigger had the Right Stuff.

      Delete
    10. Okay, David. Finally. The fifth riddle... "under certain circumstances" ... like sunbathing on Hapuna Beach in Hawaii.

      Hint for your third riddle: four-wheeled Shelby
      Hint for your fourth: [miler Sebastian][French James]

      Lego'sKudosDavid'sWay

      Delete
    11. For the record:

      For a third riddle, what is the difference between a snake and an item of clothing for conjoined twins?

      One is a cobra, the other a co-bra.

      How about a fourth riddle as a clue? Take a fictional TV character (last name). Change a vowel sound to get something that sounds like an item of clothing for conjoined twins (of the opposite sex from the third riddle).

      One is Kojak (played by Telly Savalas, the root of many of the above clues), the other is co-jock.

      Okay, for a fifth riddle. I mathematical term (plural) could also be a description of the conjoined twins from the fourth riddle, in certain circumstances.

      One is cotangents, the other is co-tan-gents.

      Delete
    12. Thank you, David.
      Your third riddle reminded me of a mnemonic device I created in high school math class to keep "triggernometric" (nice coinage, David) functions straight. I will discuss it more in tomorrow's Puzzleria!

      LegoMathemeticiansHaveJustAnnouncedThatTheyHaveJustPulledTheTriggerOnAChangeInTerminologyAndThatTheTangentFunctionWillHereafterBeKnownAsTheBoehnerFunction

      Delete
    13. You didn't use Chief SOH CAH TOA, Lego, like the rest of us?

      Delete
    14. Word Woman,

      That would have been a helpful mnemonic to know all right, but our triggernometry teacher was a Native American woman who deemed Chief Soh Cah Toa the moral equivalent of uttering aloud the nickname of the Washington D.C. National Football League franchise.

      She also referred to “trigonometry” as “ whitefellahnometry.”

      LegoMnemononometry

      Delete
    15. Of course, you would call blind conjoined twins co-see-cants.

      Delete
    16. Good stuff, you two.

      George Hamilton dies and is greeted by St. Peter at the Pearly-White-Teeth Gates.

      "Well," St. Pete says, "You perpetrated a slew of on-screen dreck during your career, perpetuating living hell for your viewers. Normally this would be grounds for sending you hellward..."

      "Oh, for Pete's sake!" George exclaims.

      "But we did find one redeeming scene," the Pearly Gatekeeper continues. "Actually it is a scene that nearly caused us to send Pete Falk to hell. But here in heaven everything is relative. So, welcome to eternal paradise. You can pick up your beard, wings, harp and halo from props, over behind that cloud just beyond wardrobe. That's where you can pick up your robe and sandals."

      "Thanks, St. Peter." says George. "Does that mean I am an archangel?"

      "No," Peter explains, "just an an arctangent."

      LegittleBigo

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    17. Okay, internet god, I suppose I deserved that.

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    18. Yes, Paul, I think we can all agree that you deserve every bit of grief the internet god can dole out! But what about Word Woman? What has she done to deserve the cyber-deity's wrath?

      LegoTheGodsAreFickle

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  26. Lego, ready for a career change? I will be visiting there next week; I can put in a good word for you. (I'll probably fail the touring test, though.)

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  27. jan,

    Yes, Please put in a good word for me... although they will probably sue me for copyright infringement or something.

    I would love to make sport of these chaps, but cannot. After all, learning through having fun with puzzles in one of Puzzleria's! watchwords.

    LegoProfessorOfLegoImpostory

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  28. The answer to my picture puzzle is obtained by answering, or just asking yourself, the first part/question in the presentation, which is asking which photo you like best, Roy (or) Bison. This provides you with the answer: ROY ORBISON. I asked Lego to run it a little longer in hopes that ron, who always posts here would have a chance to weigh in. Thanks for your patience.
    Mark (SDB)

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