Friday, January 4, 2019

A resting place for weary bones; The Past of the Mohawkans; Nicens Baby Tuckoo meets a moocow; Two types of titles; Hosiery? No Sirree! Grocery! Rosary! “Ain’t no cure for the summertime barbecues!”


PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“Ain’t no cure for the summertime barbecues!”

Remove one letter from a brand name associated with summertime barbecues.
The result is the last name at birth and the eventual last name of a prominent American. 
Who is it?
What is the brand name?


Appetizer Menu

Note: We at Puzzleria! are pleased to feature the following “Cryptic” Appetizer puzzle created by our great friend Mark Scott of Seattle. (You may know him by his screen name, skydiveboy.
We have published several of Mark’s puzzles on Puzzleria!, including one of my all-time-favorites (about a poker player who is “all thumbs”) which I am linking to here
Thanks, Mark, for sharing your cleverness and creativity with us.

“Cryptic” Appetizer
A resting place for weary bones

There is a phrase/idiom that describes how exhausted one may be, and it is in four words.
Now switch the first and last words to come up with another, contrived, phrase that could apply to, and be heard at, a cemetery when preceded by the word “No.”
What is this phrase/idiom?
What is the contrived phrase?

Heavenly Pop Hit Appetizer:
Two types of titles

Name a three-word title of a popular hit record from the 1960’s. Remove from the third word a somewhat common preposition and replace it with the letters in a synonym of  “portents” – but first mix up the letters of this synonym. 
This altered three-world title now expresses the names of two rivals. (The first name is the first word in a two-word informal nickname.) 
These rivals shall presently compete for a type of title that is different from the title of this pop hit, or of any pop hit’s title.
What is the song title?
What are the names of the rivals?
Hint: The names of the rivals that you are seeking are identical except for their second and third letters.


MENU

Tribes And Tribulations Slice:
The Past of the  “Mohawkans”

In the 1600’s the Mohawks and other tribes in their confederation sought to expand their territory westward, so fought the Huron confederation tribes. 
Remove from a noun depicting these Mohawk battlers the letters of some weapons they brought to battle, leaving the first two letters of the name of their confederation. 
What are the name describing these Mohawks, their weapons, and the name of their confederation?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Nicens Baby Tuckoo meets a moocow

Will Shortz’s December 30th  NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
What world capital becomes the informal name for a farm animal if you change its third letter?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:

ENTREE #1:
Name a world capital that becomes the first name of a certain lyricist and melody maker if you change its third letter. 
If you take this musician’s last name literally, the person with that first name is also a maker of large farm wagons. 
What is this capital?
What is the melody maker’s name?

ENTREE #2:
What world capital, if you change its third letter and divide the result in half, describes what a particular politician did in 1979-80, in a proper noun and past-tense verb.
What is this capital?
Who is the politician and what did the politician do?
Hint: Divide into two words the country of which this city is the capital. The result will be what the particular politician might have said about what he/she did in 1979-80.

ENTREE #3:
What world capital becomes the nickname of a former Minnesota Twins pitcher if you change its third letter? 
What capital becomes the profession of TC Bear (“TC” stands for “Twin Cities”) if you switch its two vowels and change one of them to an “o”? 

ENTREE #4:
Change the fifth letter of a world capital and divide the result in half. Change the last letter in the first half to a y”.
Now add a “t” to a synonym of “fake” or “insincere,” rearrange its letters and put the result between the two halves of the divided world capital. 
The result is a three-word category encompassing “Crunchy Frog,” “Spam,” or “The Dirty Fork.” 
What is this capital? What is the synonym?

ENTREE #5:
Remove the third letter from a world capital and rearrange the remaining letters.
If you have the right rearrangement, the result is an informal, somewhat jocular name for a judge without a robe who normally works outdoors. It is also the formal name of a zoo animal.
What are this capital and the name for a judge or zoo animal?

ENTREE #6: 
Change the eighth letter in a world capital.
The result is a caption for the image pictured here.
What are this capital and caption?



ENTREE #7:
A world capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal (roughly the same size as a moocow) if you change its second letter and replace its fourth letter with a duplicate of its third letter.
What are this world capital and farm animal name?

ENTREE #8:
What U.S. state capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal if you change its fifth letter and replace its third letter with a duplicate of its fourth letter?

ENTREE #9:
A world capital becomes a terse dictionary entry, in three words total (like this one for the word terse), if you change its third letter and divide the result into three words of unequal length. 
What is this capital?

ENTREE #10:
What world capital becomes a collective term for frogs, biting bugs, or locusts, for example, if you change its second letter?


Dessert Menu

Sight And Sound Dessert:
Hosiery? No Sirree! Grocery! Rosary! 

Name something you might see where people buy groceries that sounds like something you might hear in the presence of rosaries. 
What might you see and hear?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

44 comments:

  1. I've only just read the Schpuzzle, and have a question. I don't understand about "last name at birth and eventual last name of..." Is one of those words wrong?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sorry about the confusion, ViolinTeddy.
      Perhaps giving an example of such a person might help.
      Frances Gumm (name at birth) eventually was known as Judy Garland. If she were the answer to this Schpuzzle the brand name of the product might be, say, the "Gummy Garland," a fun novelty necklace to hand out to each of your guests at a Luau-themed summertime Barbecue! Remove the "y" from "Gummy Garland" and you've got "Gumm Garland."

      LegoWhoThinksThat"SomewhereOverTheRainbowLike"HuesOfTheFun"GummyGarland"NoveltyProductIsAPotOfGoldenProfitsJustWaitingToBeGleaned!

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    2. OOh, the answer just hit me!!

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    3. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    4. The answer" also hit people... with shoulder pads and, later, with golf balls.

      LegoNotesThatTheyWereHellishPopsToTheHeadRatherThanHeavenlyPopHits!

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    5. Oh, I just understood what you meant...natch, I was thinking female again.

      Delete
  2. Very strange...I had made a comment 20 minutes or so ago, prior to the above comment, and it VANISHED from the blog. Not that it matters.....

    ReplyDelete
  3. In the non-Schpuzzle arena, puzzles I managed to solve last night were: SkyDiveBoy's [I THINK, which elates me because usually I can never get HIS], the T&T Slice, an Entrees #2, 4, 7, 8 and 10. Plus I have AN answer for Dessert, but i'm not sure it is correct.

    Thus, that leaves me with the HPH Appetizer, plus Entrees #1,3, 5, 6 and 9 to go. (This to make it easier for you to know which hints will be begged for! Hee hee)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Happy first Friday of 2019 everybody! We went grocery shopping and through a drive-thru for supper today, because the rest of my family went to NYC for a week, and we probably would have gone too, except Mom wasn't feeling too well. After checking Puzzleria! Late last night, I was only able to get most of the Entrees(not including #5 and #9). So hints will of course be necessary. That includes SDB's puzzle, whether he likes it or not(I have a feeling he won't like it however it turns out). I solved this week's Prize Crossword by Tramp, despite my best efforts. Quite a few answers were difficult to parse out. I basically ended up getting the straightforward parts, and the wordplay is anyone's guess, IMHO. Hope everyone has another good week working on these puzzles! BTW we could have gone to NYC as well, except I'm sort of afraid to fly.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hints:

    HPHA:
    The song was popular in the late 1960s.
    There is a color and a flower in its title.

    ROSS:
    ENTREE #1:
    The "melody maker" (okay, "singer-songwriter," if you insist) is connected in a way with this wonderful trio.
    ENTREE #3:
    The pitcher was a black "cat" who you'd think would be realted to another fine pitcher nicknamed "Catfish"... except that this "catfish" is not black. But both pitched superbly.
    ENTREE #5:
    Some angry people question these judges' judgment, and sometimes even shout, "Kill the ( judge without a robe who normally works outdoors)!"
    ENTREE #6:
    What are those implements on the ends of the vanes? That's the last half of the answer.
    Because this is a photo and not a video or "giphy" image, we cannot tell if the first half of the answer is present.
    ENTREE #9:
    The world capital is situated on the "Nude Bauble..." I may have that mixed up. I get that way when I'm a bit peckish, as the Brits say.

    LegoWhoIsOnTheWayToRaidTheFridge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got the 60s tune, and I of all bloggers here should know it, considering what's coming up next week. I also have Entree #5. But not Entree #9. Nude Bauble? I'm not familiar with that one(and I've checked the list).

      Delete
    2. I feel the tide may be turning, no? Or we'll certainly turn on the tide...ah well, rolling, er, moving right along.

      Delete
  6. QUESTION: I was just painfully working out the HPH Appetizer, thanks to the hint, but shouldn't the synonym of 'portent' be PLURAL? Otherwise, I am missing an 's'!!

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    Replies
    1. You are, as usual, correct, ViolinTedditor. Thank you to the power of infinity!

      LeGoWhoOughtToBetterRealizeTheImportentsOfAccuracy

      Delete
  7. Also, solved Entrees 1 and 3, which would have been utterly impossible without the hints, since as usual, I'd never heard of any of it, but although I already DID have the assumed real name of the 'judge', I can't come up with any way to solve the puzzle beyond that.

    And like pjb, I'm still stuck on #9....have no idea how to use 'nude bauble'...there are no anagrams, of the whole phrase or of just 'bauble', and switching first letters led nowhere either.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The anagram of NUDE BAUBLE, which is in two words, includes an uppercase proper noun.

      LegoSuggestsDitchingTheOnlineAnagramGeneratorsAndPouringOutTheScrabble(OrBananagram)Tiles!

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    2. Does it have to do with Beau Bundles Hair Extensions?

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    3. Nope, no Beau Bundles connection. It's where the capital is located... and I don't mean in teh West Point Minty or ref's pocket!
      The anagram of NUDE BAUBLE also includes a lowercase color.

      LegoNowWaltzingOffToBed

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    4. Ah, I just solved Entree #9. Got the anagram pretty fast, once I sat down to do it....This leaves me with only #5 undone.

      Delete
    5. Not quite sure why "yipes", but that commercial surely is cute. I wonder WHERE You Tube posters FIND these old things?

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    6. OOOH, I just caught on, and solved #5. Thank you again.

      Delete
    7. Do I hear a waltz? Got all the Entrees now, BTW.

      Delete
  8. cranberry,
    Sorry 'bout 'Bama. It's just not their night. There may have been a handful of iffy calls (by the "zoo animals") that did not go their way. But Those Tigers could just not be held. Ebb Tide, alas.

    LegoExpressingSolaceThatTonightYouCan'tRevel,RowerOfTheNormallyRollingTide(ThanksLargelyToQuarterbackTrevorLawrence!)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Thanks, Lego. The Tigers just wanted it more. Cool anagram, too BTW.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Patrick. High praise indeed, coming from "The King of Anagrams."

      LegoOgle

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    2. Thanks again, but how about a few more hints? I still only have the 60s hit one and all the Entrees! That's it!

      Delete
    3. Schpuzzle:
      The "prominent American" held a high office yet was never elected to it.
      CA:
      Some people spit on graves... others just leave footprints.
      HPHA:
      If you've got the right weapons these battlers brought to battle, take a bow. The "battlers" no longer dwell in the Land of Marquette; they're still in the Land of the Golden Gate, though.
      SASD:
      The "something you might see where people buy groceries" is in the produce section... specifically greens.

      Lego'LeventhHourHinting

      Delete
  10. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  11. KINGSFORD > KING FORD

    DEAD ON MY FEET > NO FEET ON MY DEAD?

    CRIMSON AND CLOVER > CRIMSON (TIDE) AND CLEMSON

    WARRIORS-ARROWS=IR(OQUOIS)

    LONDON > LOUDON WAINWRIGHT

    TEHRAN > TED RAN [IRAN > I RAN]

    MUSCAT > MUDCAT / MUSCAT > MASCOT

    MONTEVIDEO+(PHONY+T) > MONTY PYTHON VIDEO

    ZAGREB > ZEBRA

    WINDHOEK > WINDHOES

    DUBLIN > DOBBIN

    BOISE > BOSSY

    BUDAPEST > BUG: A PEST

    PRAGUE > PLAGUE

    LETTUCE SPRAY > LET US PRAY

    ReplyDelete
  12. SCHPUZZLE: KINGSFORD => KING & FORD (Leslie L./ President Gerald R.)

    SKYDIVEBOYS' APPETIZER: DEAD ON ONE'S FEET => NO FEET ON ONE'S DEAD?

    HPH APPETIZER: CRIMSON AND CLOVER => CRIMSON AND CLEMSON, Jan. 7 2019 championship NCAA game upcoming

    T & T SLICE: WARRIORS minus ARROWS = "IR" from IRIQUOIS

    ENTREES:

    1. LONDON => LOUDON WAINWRIGHT [Thank you to Wikipedia! Never heard of this guy, of course.]
    2. TEHRAN, IRAN => TED RAN; I RAN
    3. MUSCAT => MUDCAT [Grant]
    4. MONTEVIDEO; MONTY/VIDEO; add PHONY & T => MONTY PYTHON VIDEO
    5. ZAGREB => ZEBRA [Umpire]
    6. WINDHOEK => WIND HOES
    7. DUBLIN => DOBBIN
    8. BOISE => BOSSY
    9. BUDAPEST (on the BLUE DANUBE) => BUG: A PEST
    10. PRAGUE => PLAGUE

    DESSERT: PETITIONS [Clearly, from the hint given above, this was NOT your intended answer! BUt I think it works!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. VT,
      "...something you might see where people buy groceries" sounds like "petitions"...?
      I'm not understanding. Please elucidate. Merci.

      LegoWhoIsConfusedButWhoWouldAlsoLikeToHearMoreAboutViolinTeddy's"Petitions"Answer

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    2. You know, people who stand in grocery stores (or just outside the entrance) with petitions in hand, asking people to sign? At least, *I*'ve seen plenty of those in my time!! And from what I looked up, people with rosaries are making petitions/prayers.

      Delete
    3. I.e. a bystander might HEAR the rosary-holding person saying petitions/prayers

      Delete
  13. Congrats to VT and Paul for solving my puzzle.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. THanks, SDB...that's only the second one of yours I've ever figured out!

      Delete
  14. Schpuzzle
    KINGSFORD(charcoal), (Leslie)KING became(Gerald)FORD
    Appetizer Part 1
    DEAD ON ONE'S FEET, NO FEET ON ONE'S DEAD(?)
    Part 2
    "CRIMSON AND CLOVER"(by Tommy James and the Shondells), CRIMSON(Tide)and CLEMSON
    Menu Part 1
    ARROWS=WARRIORS-IR(for Iroquois)
    Part 2
    Entrees
    1. LONDON, LOUDON WAINWRIGHT III
    2. TEHRAN, TED RAN(Ted Kennedy), "I RAN"
    3. MUSCAT, MUDCAT(Grant)
    4. MONTEVIDEO, "MONTY PYTHON" VIDEO
    5. ZAGREB, ZEBRA(umpire)
    6. WINDHOEK, WIND HOES
    7. DUBLIN, DOBBIN(nickname for a horse)
    8. BOISE, BOSSY(nickname for a cow)
    9. BUDAPEST(on the Blue Danube), "BUG: A PEST"
    10. PRAGUE, PLAGUE
    Dessert
    LETTUCE SPRAY, "LET US PRAY"
    Amen!-pjb

    ReplyDelete
  15. This week's answers for the record, part 1:

    PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

    Schpuzzle Of The Week:
    “Ain’t no cure for the summertime barbecues!”
    https://www.dictionary.com/browse/cure
    Remove a letter from a brand associated with summertime barbecues.
    The result is the last name at birth and the eventual last name of a prominent American.
    Who is it?
    Answer:
    (President) Gerald Ford, born Leslie King (Kingsford brand charcoal)

    Appetizer Menu

    "Cryptic" Appetizer
    A resting place for weary bones

    There is a phrase/idiom that describes how exhausted one may be, and it is in four words.
    Now switch the first and last words to come up with another, contrived, phrase that could apply to, and be heard at, a cemetery when preceded by the word, “No.”
    What is this phrase/idiom?
    What is the contrived phrase?
    Answer:
    Dead on your feet; No feet on your dead (That is to say, "Do not walk upon the gravestones of the deceased.")

    Heavenly Pop Hit Appetizer
    Two types of titles
    Name a three-word title of a popular hit record from the 1960s. Remove from the third word a somewhat common preposition and replace it with the letters in a synonym of “portent” – but first mix these letters up.
    This altered three-world title now expresses the names of two rivals. (The first name is the first word in a two-word informal nickname.)
    These rivals will presently compete for a type of title different from the pop hit’s title.
    What is the song title?
    What are the names of the rivals?
    Hint: The names of the rivals that you found are identical except for their second and third letters.
    Answer:
    "Crimson and Clover"; Crimson (Tide, that is, Alabama) and Clemson

    MENU

    Tribes And Tribulations Slice
    The Past of the “Mohawkans”

    In the 1600s, the Mohawks and other tribes in their confederation sought to expand their territory westward, so fought the Huron confederation tribes. Remove from a name describing these Mohawks the letters of weapons they brought to battle, leaving the first two letters of the name of their confederation. What are the name describing these Mohawks, their weapons, and the name of their confederation?
    Answer:
    Warriors; arrows; Iroquois (Confederacy)

    Lego...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Minor correction.
      (That is to say, "Do not walk upon the gravestones of the deceased.") Should read:

      (That is to say, "Do not walk on the graves of the dead.")

      You cannot walk on upright gravestones. The admonishment is to not walk over the grass covering the casket. Now, some graves are such that you could walk on a full length stone or concrete, but that is not as common. Fortunately burial is becoming unpopular, with cremation the hot ticket now. (pun intended) Composting with wood chips is emerging now too, but is just in its infancy.

      Delete
    2. Thanks for the clarification, skydiveboy. And great thanks for a great puzzle.

      LegoHoweverNotesThatSomeGraveMarkersMayBeTreadedUpon

      Delete
    3. Well thanks for running it, Lego, but I would not go so far as to call this one of my better puzzles, let alone being great. I tend to send my better ones to Will Shortz so he can use them on his NPR Sunday segment, but he never does, even when he sends me personal email saying they are really, really good, but he doesn't want to use anything that can be solved via lists. Yes, I did write back to inform him that almost every one of his puzzles require lists to solve.

      I should also point out that Lego has used some of my better puzzles, some also WS rejected, here on his excellent puzzle blog in the past. I just have been holding on to my better NPR submissions in case Shortz wakes up one day, which makes me look like a fool who would drink the Kool-Aid, I know, but we all have our insane moments.

      Delete
  16. his week's answers for the record, part 2:

    Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
    Nicens Baby Tuckoo meets a moocow

    ENTREE #1:
    Name a world capital becomes the first name of a certain lyric and melody maker if you change its third letter. If you take this melody maker’s last name literally, the person with that first name is also a maker of large farm wagons.
    What is this capital?
    What is the melody maker’s name?
    Answer:
    London (England); Loudon Wainwright III
    London, (England); Louden Wainwright III
    ENTREE #2:
    What world capital, if you change its third letter and divide the result in half, describes what a particular politician did in 1979-80, in a proper noun and past-tense verb.
    What is this capital?
    Who is the politician and what did the politician do?
    Answer:
    Tehran, (Iran); Ted (Kennedy) ran (for president);
    ENTREE #3:
    What world capital becomes the nickname of a former Minnesota Twins pitcher if you change its third letter? What capital becomes the profession of TC Bear if you switch its two vowels and change one of them to an “o”?
    Answer:
    Muscat, (Oman); (Jim) Mudcat (Grant); Mascot
    ENTREE #4:
    Change the fifth letter of a world capital and divide the result in half. Change the last letter in the first half to a “y”.
    Add a “t” to a synonym of “fake” or “insincere,” rearrange its letters and put the result between the two halves of the divided world capital. The result is a three-word description of “The Dirty Fork,” “Crunchy Frog” or “Spam.”
    What is this capital? What is the synonym?
    Answer:
    Montevideo, (Uruguay); Phony; (Monty Python video)
    ENTREE #5:
    Remove the third letter from a world capital and rearrange the remaining letters.
    If you have the right rearrangement, the result is an informal, somewhat jocular name for a judge without a robe who normally works outdoors. It is also the formal name of a zoo animal.
    What are this capital and the name for a judge without a robe who normally works outdoors. or zoo animal?
    Answer:
    Zagreb, (Croatia); Zebra
    ENTREE #6:
    What world capital becomes a caption for the image pictured here if you change its eighth letter?
    Answer:
    Windhoek, (Namibia); (Wind-hoes)
    ENTREE #7:
    What world capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal (roughly the same size as a moocow) if you change its second letter and replace its fourth letter with a duplicate of its third letter?
    Answer:
    Dublin, (Ireland); Dobbin
    ENTREE #8:
    What U.S. state capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal if you change its fifth letter and replace its third letter with a duplicate of its fourth letter?
    Answer:
    Boise, (Idaho); Bossy

    ENTREE #9:
    What world capital becomes a terse dictionary entry, in three words total, if you change its third letter and divide the result into three words of unequal length. What is this capital?
    Answer:
    Budapest, (Hungary); "Bug: A Pest"

    ENTREE #10:
    What world capital becomes, for example, frogs, biting bugs, or locusts if you change its second letter?
    Answer:
    Prague, (Czechia); Plague


    Dessert Menu

    Sight And Sound Dessert:
    Hosiery? No Sirree! Grocery! Rosary!
    Name something you might see where people buy groceries that sounds like something you might hear in the presence of rosaries. What might you see and hear?
    Answer:
    Lettuce spray; "Let us pray"

    Lego!

    ReplyDelete