Friday, December 8, 2017

The last shall be first and the last shall be last; Who let the hogs out? Dishing out non-vegetarian delish; Perural and Singupolar Lebanoun Formosas

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1098 + 76) SERVED  

Welcome to our December 8th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!, the blog that puzzlemaster Will Shortz called “a lot of fun” over the National Public Radio airwaves this past Sunday. Thank you, Will.

We are serving you seven heavenly puzzles this week, including four Riffing-Off Shortz Slices. The first of those four was created by ron, a valued and inventive longtime Puzzleria! contributor. He posted it early Sunday morning on the excellent Blainesville blog, and I liked it so much that I asked ron if I could use it on Puzzleria! He graciously agreed. Our sincere gratitude, ron. 

Our menus also feature:
⇩ One “punt-pass-and-kick-packed” Appetizer
⇩ One  “grid-but-without-the-iron” Slice; and
⇩ One  “watchin’-‘em-punt-the-ol’-pigskin-on-the-Dish-Network” Dessert.

So, belly up to the line of scrimmage, run a bootleg across the backfield, loft a bomb endzoneward, and execute a Lambeau Leap to celebrate your puzzle-solving touchdowns. And... have a lot of fun.


Appetizer Menu

“Is There A Hiker In The House?” Appetizer:
The last shall be first and the last shall be last


It was on a Sunday in  January, 1964. 
A team walked off a football field victorious. Among them were two players who were future Canton, Ohio enshrinees – one who on every play from scrimmage executed by their team handled the football, the other who handled the ball on every play except for punts and field goal attempts. 
One man wore a jersey with a two-digit number, the other a jersey with the same digits, but reversed.

Exactly seven weeks later, a man appeared onstage on a live television broadcast along with some other men. His first name was the last name of one of the victorious football players; His last name was the last name of the other football player. After that TV appearance, his name very soon became a household name.


What are the names of these football players and man with the household name?
(Note: Yes, yes, yes! I know it is spelled “Neil,” not “Neal.”) 


MENU

4x4 Truck, 5x5 Van De Graaph Generated Grid Slice:
Who let the hogs out?

The answer to each of the ten puzzle clues below is a 5-letter entry that fits somewhere into a 5-by-5 crossword grid like the one pictured here. Although the clues are numbered, they are given in no particular order. Fill in the grid.
1. Indian craft 
2. Let the hogs out? 
3. Palindromic craft 
4. Flat-bottomed garbage boats 
5. Wilbur’s beloved spider, for short 
6. Image on a flag that is a homophone of a synonym of “oar” 
7. Pearl producer, as rapped by a hip-hopper? 
8. "...one of the _____ of these brothers..."
9. Naomi who gives “powerful” dramatic portrayals? 
10. Against the ___, __ is silhouetted, in a 1982 movie poster 

Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
Perural and Singupolar Lebanoun Formosas 

Will Shortz’s December 3rd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joseph Young (“who has a puzzle blog called Puzzleria! which is a lot of fun,” according to Will Shortz), reads:
Take the singular and plural forms of a particular noun. Remove the first two letters of the singular form and you’ll name a country. Remove one letter from inside the plural form to name another country. What words and countries are these? 
Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz and Young Slices read:
ONE: 
(Our first Riff-Off Slice was created by longtime Puzzleria! contributor ron. Thanks to him.)
Take the singular and plural forms of a particular noun. Remove the first letter of the singular form of the noun and you’ll name a country. Change the first two letters of the plural form of the noun to two different letters to name a different country. What are the words and what are the countries? 
TWO:
Take the singular and plural forms of a particular 4-syllable noun that has roots in both ancient Rome and 1917-era revolutionary Russia. 
In the singular word, reverse the order of the fourth and fifth letters and replace its first three letters with the letter that alphabetically immediately precedes the first letter of the plural word. You’ll name a country. 
In the plural word, replace the first letter with the fifth letter, place a duplicate of the sixth letter at the beginning, and replace a pair of double letters with one “r”. You’ll name another country. 
What words and countries are these?
Hint: One of the countries is also the name of a U.S. state. One of the major cities in the other country is the title of a hit song by a Swedish quartet. 
THREE:
Take a proper noun associated with Nyx and Erebus. Replace the first two letters with one consonant and you’ll name a country. 
Replace the last two letters of the same proper noun with one consonant and you’ll name another country. What noun and countries are these?

FOUR:
“Stentorian,” “sideburns” and “sandwich” are examples of “eponyms,” a word coined during the Mexican-American War.
Take a particular noun that is an example of a word (also ending with -nymcoined during World War II. The particular noun itself was coined about a decade later. Replace the first two letters of this noun with two different letters and you’ll name a country. 

Remove the first letter from the noun to name another country. What words and countries are these?

Dessert Menu

Meaty Beaty Big And Bouncy Dessert:
Dishing out non-vegetarian delish

Name a two-word cut of meat often used in a two-word dish. 
The meat and dish share one word in common. 

One of the other words sounds like what one might shout while leading to slaughter the creatures that produce the meat. 


What are the cut of meat and the dish?
Hint: The word that the dish and cut of meat share is a term used in a particular Oriental martial art.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, December 1, 2017

None if by air, two if by sea; Something gained in translation? Sno Itai Verb Bala TSOP; Antiquing painter and poets readshow

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (987 + 65) SERVED

Welcome to our December 1st edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

Our five Riffing-Off-Shortz slices are baked with “French bread” crusts this week  a nod to the November 26th offering from Will Shortz, the esteemed weekly NPR puzzle-provider who is known by the nom de plume “Puzzlemaster.”

Our other three puzzles, all baked with our usual “English-language-muffin” breadcrusts, include:
One “22-state salute” Appetizer
One poetic and painterly Slice; and
One planes, trains and catamarans Dessert.

Profitez de nos puzzles s’il vous plaĆ®t.


Appetizer Menu

Catch-22 Appetizer:
Sno Itai Verb Bala TSOP

Ultimately, the answer to each of the 22 clues below is the name of a U.S. state. 

But before you can discern the name of each state you must first find the two-letter answer to each clue. 
What are these 22 states?

1. Belongs in the category with MK, LK and MT
2. Word that is the “Lost Chord,” according to the MB
3. Company that would not have existed if not for Cy McCormick and JP Morgan
4. A refreshing appliance, and the form of electical energy that powers it 
5. Sounds like the first two-thirds of a rapper
6. Monogram sported on the Killer’s and Tony O’s caps
7. “Don Don Don, Mele Kalikimaka!”
8. “England’s Rose,” according to Bernie
9. What you can call Paul from Newark
10. Mr. “TeeVeequine”?
11. Position taken by the Slendid Splinter and Yaz
12. What was black and white and spread all over... during the 1950s?
13. Where you can find MK, LK and MT
14. Notable Super Bowl comeback numeral
15. Sandwich bread for 2 at the turn of a century
16. Opposite of PM and FM
17. Sounds like the last two-thirds of a candy morsel packaged in a wrapper
18. Pronoun associated with Brute
19. Deep Blue and Watson are examples of this
20. Golfing tour? No, touring Golf
21. Sessions, for short
22. An Auntie


MENU


Programming Is Made Possible Slice:
Antiquing painter and poets readshow

Consider the names of three artists – a painter and two poets – who thrived during the Nineteenth and Twentieth centuries. 

One of the three names bears a curious connection to “Weekend Edition Sunday,” “Fresh Air,” “Car Talk” and other such programming.

The name of a second artist bears a similar connection to “Washington Week,” “Sesame Street,” “Antiques Roadshow” and other such programming. 

The name of the third artist bears the same curious connection to all such programming.
Who are these three artists?
Hint: One of the poets and the painter were born about a century apart. The other poet was born a year before that poet’s death.
Hint: One of the three artists dovetails with this week’s French theme.


Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Something gained in translation? 

Will Shortz’s November 26th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:


Think of a familiar French expression in three words, containing 3 letters, 2 letters, and 5 letters, respectively. Then take its standard translation in English, which is a two-word phrase. If you have the right phrases, the first words of the two phrases said out loud will sound like a world capital. What is it? 
Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Think of a somewhat familiar French expression in three words, containing 3 letters, 2 letters, and 3 letters, respectively. Then take its standard translation in English, which is one word. 
If you have the right phrases, the third word of the French expression and the first syllable of the English word, if said out loud, will sound something like what a person experiencing the effects of the expression might beg for. 


What are this French expression, its English translation, and what the person might beg for?

TWO:
Think of a somewhat familiar French expression in two words, containing 4 letters and 5 letters, respectively. 
Then take its literal translation in English, which is a two-word phrase. If you have the right phrases, saying out loud the first word of the English translation followed the first word of the French expression (after you add a long-e syllable to its end) will sound like a Huddie Ledbetter song title. 
What are this French expression, its English translation, and the Ledbetter song title? 

THREE:
Name a luxury auto brand. Rotate its middle letter 90 degrees clockwise to form the name of a world capital city whose etymology pertains to entomology. What is this city?

FOUR:
Think of a world capital that sounds like the first word of a French expression followed by the first word in the English translation of that expression.  The capital’s official name, in its short form (according to Wikipedia), contains three of the same consonant. 
These three letters form the short form of a hateful hate group. The remaining letters in the capital’s official short-form name can be rearranged to form two words a law officer might want to say upon arresting a member of the group in the act of commiting a hate crime.
What is the short form of the capital’s official name? What is the hate group? What might the arresting officer want to say?
Note: An abbreviation of the capital’s official full name (again, according to Wikipedia) differs from the short form of its official name by one letter. If you remove the same three identical consonants from this abbreviated name, you can rearrange the remaining letters into two words to describe the arrested member of the hate group after his arrest.

FIVE:
Think of a familiar French expression in three words, containing 3 letters, 2 letters, and 5 letters, respectively. Take the standard translation, in French, of the English word “seated” which sounds like the 4-letter English-word answer to all the following crossword clues: “On open waters,” “Completely lost,” “Traversing the deep” and “Fishing, perhaps.”
Place the the second and third words of the 3-word familiar French expression in front of the French translation of the English word “seated” to form what sounds something like an 4-syllable English word that can follow “Checkbook,” “Gunboat” or “French.”
What is this 4-syllable word?

Dessert Menu

Blue Onesies Dessert:
None if by air, two if by sea

Remove the first half of the name of a global air transporter and place a boy’s baby name after the result. 
Name one of many assets this transportation company has. Place the same boy’s baby name after it. 


You’ll name two things you might see not in the air (or even on land) but instead in the sea. What are they?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Sad & blue... can’t do the boogaloo; The incredible inedible eggshell? Bad cons and connotations; “Somethin’ is forgotten in the state of Texas”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (987 + 65) SERVED


Welcome to our November 24th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

Happy Cold Turkey Sandwich Day! It’s the day we rightly give thanks for leftovers. But don’t expect any leftover puzzles on this week’s menus – all are fresh from our oven and piping hot.
We are serving up:
One “bad mother of invention” Appetizer
One “there is no puzzle either good or bad, but thinking makes it so” Slice;
⇓⇓⇓⇓Four highly unusual... well okay, rather perhaps somewhat unusual Riffing-Off-Shortz Slices; and
One “wokking on eggshells” (using vegetable oil as a soothing agent) Dessert.

So, quick, stick your gray-matter forks in these mysterious morsels. Make your Black Friday a Red Letter puzzle-solving Day. And, please enjoy the feast.


Appetizer Menu

Eponymous Weaponry Appetizer:
Bad cons and connotations

Think of a kind of weapon named after its inventor. Three consecutive letters in the name of the weapon form a word with bad connotations. Replace it with a different three-letter word with bad connotations to form the last name of a bad guy who used similar albeit perhaps more destructive weapons.

What is this weapon and who is this bad guy?


MENU

Droppin’ A “G” On You Slice:
“Somethin’ is forgotten in the state of Texas”

Name a one-word synonym for “acting obsequiously.”  
A guy from Texas, say, who speaks Southern American English might pronounce this synonym by “forgetting” to enunciate its final “g.” A bystander who overhears this Texan’s prounciation might think he is giving a somewhat pejorative name for the place he hangs his hat, the hamlet he calls home.
What is this synonym? What does the bystander mishear it as?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Sad & blue... can’t do the boogaloo 

Will Shortz’s November 19th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Im going to give you six words. Besides the fact that each word contains the letter E, what highly unusual property do they share?
ADIEU
AMAZED
BUREAUS
ELATES
HEAD-ON
SIENNAS
Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
I’m going to give you six words. Besides the fact that none of the words contains the letters D or T, and only two contain an A, what highly unusual property do they share?
ABASE
E-BOOK
I'VE
UM
A
SUN

TWO:
I’m going to give you eleven words. Besides the fact that no word contains the letter B, J, K, P, Q or Y, what somewhat unusual property do they share? 


The words are in alphabetical order. Put them in a different order based on the unusual property they share. Find a twelfth word that also shares the property and would logically fit into the twelfth position.
(There may be more than one word that works. My intended answer begins and ends with consonants and contains nine letters.)
CAVEFISH
EXIST
FIGHTER
INTERZONAL
NEWTONS
SCROFULA
SIENNA
TETHERS
UNSEVERED
VENOM
VENTS
* Extra credit: Identify the cookie and all nine people over the age of 9 in the collage of photos pictured in this puzzle slice (ignore the people in the TV screen). Anyone who identifies the tenth person pictured gets extra-extra-read-all-about-it credit.  

THREE:
I’m going to give you seven words. Besides the fact that six of the seven words contain the letter E and all seven contain a consonant in common, what somewhat unusual property do they share?
BALKED
DONNED
DOPE
HANDS
SKATED
STEADY
TOILED

FOUR:
Im going to give you nine words. Besides the fact that the first letters of the ten words can be rearranged to form the words “CAR HICCUPS,” what somewhat unusual property do they share?
Note: One of the 10 words in the list is purposely misspelled. A duplicate of one of its letters was removed to make it eligible for the purposes of this puzzle.

ABASE
CONTENT
UKE
HERMIT
CONVENT
INDULT
REVEL
SUPLICATE
CONTEST
PRODUCT


Dessert Menu

Compounding The Foodie Problem Dessert:
The incredible inedible eggshell?

Each of the two parts of a compound word for a food is also by itself a word for a food. All three foods usually contain inedible parts. 


Place the word for one of these usually inedible parts after the first part of the compound word. Remove the first letter of the result to form a plant associated with vegetable oil production.

What are these three foods and the plant associated with vegetable oil?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.