Friday, December 2, 2016

Translating Sedaris into Enigmalish; And the winner is… Geena Davis! Stop and spell the dozen roses; Uprooting ascenders makes a level playing field (or, to rip-off Blaine, “Best S’porting Actress”)


P! SLICES: OVER (pe)3 – (e4 + p3) SERVED

Welcome back to Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!... our December 2nd edition. Thanks to all for holding down the fort in my absence.

I am still trying to recover all my Puzzleria! data from my Seagate 320-GB external hard drive. Thankfully, the prolific and proficient PlannedChaos, in addition to helping me in my quest to track down my lost files, has kindly stepped up to contribute 19 puzzles (a baker’s half-dozen plus a dozen) to this weeks edition

You are sure to enjoy his Platter of Seven  Hors d’Oeuvres and his twelve Ripping Off Shortz Enigmatic Slices.


 
I myself have managed to cobble together a only few Ripping Off Shortz puzzles – the Appetizer and the Dessert.

But here is an informal bonus visual puzzle: One of the images of hors doeuve platters pictured in this introduction is geometrically incorrect... and therefore numerically incorrect. 

Which image is it?


 But that is merely a warm-up. 

So, now you ought to be primed to boot up your own bits of unencrypting wits and drive hard toward recovering the answers to this week’s puzzles.

And, as always, enjoy.

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Platter Of Seven Hors d’Oeuvres:
Translating Sedaris into Enigmalish

(Author’s note: the following seven puzzles are not endorsed by David Sedaris. Any similarities to the works of Mr. Sedaris are entirely intentional.)

1. When You Are Engulfed in Flames

Think of a movie director, first and last names, whose last name can be split into two ordinary English words. Change the second of these words into its antonym and remove the first word, and the result when read aloud will sound like the first and last names of a well-known standup and comedic actor. With apologies to Jerry Seinfeld, who are these people?

2. Holidays on Ice

Name a romantic movie that features a location in its title. This movie stars an actress whose first and last names can be rearranged into the name of another location. What is the movie, who is the actress, and what is the other location?

3–4: Me Search Pretty One Day

3. Name a highly populated city. Move the city’s first two letters to the end to name an internet search engine. What is the city, and what is the search engine?

4. Write down the name of a medical procedure performed on females. Then write down the name of an internet search engine. The medical procedure ends with two particular letters, and the search engine begins with the same two letters in reverse order. Remove three of these four letters and read back the result to name a type of fabric often worn by women. What are these words?

5–7: Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim

5. Think of a compound word that names a category of clothing. The last syllable has two vowels. Replace one of these vowels with a different vowel, and move the other vowel to the end to name a more specific category of clothing that exists within the first category. What are these types of clothing?

6. Think of a brand name for a type of food in two words. Remove the space and two letters that are consecutive in the alphabet to get one word that is a brand name for a type of garment.

7. Think of a type of exercise equipment in three words. Exchange two letters in the third word to name a type of garment.

Appetizer Menu

Ripping Off Shortz And Reiss (And Hook) Appetizer:
Uprooting ascenders makes a level playing field (or, to rip-off Blaine, “Best S’porting Actress”)
 
Will Shortz’s National Public Radio Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle for Nov. 27, created by Mike Reiss (by way of Henry Hook), reads:

Take the first name of a famous actress. Drop a letter. Rearrange what’s left, and you’ll get a word used in a particular sport. This actress’s last name, without any changes, is another word used in the same sport. What actress is it?

LegoLambda’s Ripping Off Shortz (and Reiss and Hook) Slice reads:
Take the first name of a famous actress. Lowercase the first letter and uppercase the fourth letter. Eradicate the four letters in the name that now look very much the same. Rearrange the remaining letters to form a new word that, when paired with the actress’s last name, results in a two-word term for a particular piece of game equipment.

Now rearrange the letters of the first name of an actress who is a former model to get a word for where a game player sometimes places the aforementioned particular piece of game equipment (but not during the game). The former model’s last name is a word for what a game player sometimes does to the particular piece of game equipment during the course of a game.

What actresses are these?
What is the piece of game equipment? Where does a player place it, and what does a player do to it?

MENU 

Ripping Off Shortz Enigmatic Slices:
Stop and spell the dozen roses

PlannedChaos’ Ripping Off Shortz (and Reiss and Hook) Slices read:

1. Think of a popular musician, first and last names. Rearrange the first name into three words, and put two of these words after her last name. The result describes where the devout leave their vehicles on a Sunday morning.

2. The last name of a famous actress is a term used in a particular sport. Using her first name, drop a letter and rearrange to name a unit of measurement appropriate for where the sport is played. (A different letter can be dropped, and the result rearranged, to name a different unit of measurement.)

3.Take the first name of a famous actress. Move the last letter in front to get a type of pastry. Her last name describes the citizens of a country that another pastry is named after.

4. Actress, first and last names in five and four letters respectively. Rearrange the letters in her first name, and rearrange the letters in her last name, to describe an audiophile.

5. Drop two letters from the first name of a famous comedienne. Rearrange what's left, and together with her last name describes a landlord.

6. First and last names of a famous actress and model. Remove two letters from the first name, and what's left describes dust jackets.

7. First and last names of a famous actress. Drop one letter from the first name, and what’s left describes a chow line.

8. Think of a British-American actress, first and last names. Reverse the order of the first four letters in her first name to get American slang for a Brit’s marijuana cigarette.

9. First and last names of an actress recently in the news. Her name phonetically describes what you might need to do for a tired ocean worker.

10. Take the first and last names of a famous musician. Remove two letters from the first name, and you'll get a two word phrase that might describe the tools of the laborer in #9 after their use.

11. Actress (best known for a particular movie role), first and last names. Change one letter in the first name to an ‘r’ and rearrange. Then move the last name to the front to describe a popular piece of entertainment that may have peaked, if a recent tweet is to be believed.

12. Popular musician. First name: change last two letters to a Y. This word, and the musician’s last name, both describe a legal system that gives a successful outcome.

Dessert Menu

Ripping Off Shortz (And Hook) And Reiss Dessert:
And the winner is… Geena Davis!

The last name of an actress is a word for a person participates in a particular sport. Add a ‘d’ to her first name and rearrange the result to get two words that express what a match in this sport between this actress and Geena Davis would soon come to.

The last name of an award-winning actress is a word for a person who makes equipment for that particular sport. Remove a ‘u’ from her first name and rearrange the result to get two words this actress might exclaim after playing a match in this sport with Geena Davis.

Who are these two actresses?
What does the match (played by the first actress) soon come to? What does the second actress exclaim after her match?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!


Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Thursday, November 24, 2016

This week's November 25th edition of Puzzleria! will be postponed due to technical difficulties. We are working to fix them. We are sorry for the inconvenience.

We are having problems accessing the external hard drive on which all our Puzzleria! data is stored. We hope to provide you with a fresh helping of puzzles ASAP, however. Thank you for your patience.

LegoExternallyDrivenHardAndPutAwayWetBlanketed

Friday, November 18, 2016

Three cows on the mountain; Mizzou-ri-fa-sol-la-ti-Doh! Seattle Supersonic Boom @ 1,126 ft/sec! Ramsey, Lampley, Ewing, Lambert, Rambis; Sharpshooting stars; Switcheroodles!

P! SLICES: OVER (5 + 4) x 3 x 21 SERVED
(Thanks, PC)

Welcome to our November 18th edition of Puzzleria! This week’s edition ought to be a pretty big Hoop-di-doo.

That’s Hoop, as in basketball hoops… or, buckets, B-ball, round ball…

Three of this week’s puzzles involve basketball, and two involve “do-re-mi…” (which is fitting because many professional hoops players make lots of “dough-re-mi”)

Our sixth offering is a Slice Ripping Off Will Shortz’s fortnight-long creative challenge.

Enjoy the hoopla.

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Big Game Hors d’Oeuvre:
Sharpshooting stars

Write one caption that could be used to describe either of the images pictured here.

Your caption ought to contain 11 characters – nine letters and two numerals that are not Roman numerals – plus one hyphen. The two numerals are adjacent to each other in the caption and form a square number.

Hint: The indoor photo was taken  this past April. The outdoor photo was taken  this past week.

What is your caption?

Morsel Menu

New Orleans Hornets Aplenty Morsel:
Ramsey, Lampley, Ewing, Lambert, Rambis

Orlando Magic, Oklahoma City Thunder, Charlotte Hornets, New Orleans Hornets, New York Knickerbockers (Knicks), Philadelphia 76ers (Sixers), Seattle Supersonics (Sonics), San Diego Conquistadors (Q’s), Los Angeles Clippers, Baltimore Bullets, Boston Celtics, New Orleans Pelicans, Golden State Warriors, Detroit Pistons, Milwaukee Bucks, St. Louis Hawks, Portland Trailblazers (Blazers), San Antonio Spurs, Cleveland Cavaliers (Cavs), San Diego Sails, Houston Rockets, Kansas City Kings, Syracuse Nationals (Nats), Washington Wizards, Phoenix Suns, Los Angeles Lakers, Sacramento Kings, Indiana Pacers, Miami Heat.
 
The list above is a partial list of National Basketball Association (NBA) teams, some of which no longer exist. A few of the teams listed above were members of the American Basketball Association, which merged with the NBA in 1976. Some of the teams are/were sometimes called by a shortened form of their nickname (indicated in parentheses).

Each cager on the list below played for one or more of the teams listed above. These cagers are:
Maciei Lampe, Patrick Ewing, Doron Lamb, Ray Ramsey, Bill Laimbeer, Jim Lampley, Kurt Rambis, Frank Ramsey, Daniel Ewing, Jeremy Lamb, Jeff Lamp, John Lambert, Peter John Ramos, Patrick Ewing Jr., Bo Lamar, Sean Lampley, Cal Ramsey.
 
Take an NBA team that not a one of the above-listed cagers played for. (It is a team, therefore, that is not on the first list.) If all of these cagers had played for that team (and if we used the shortened form of the team’s nickname) we might have called the players:
_ _ _ _ _
_ _
_ _ _ _ _ _’
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _.

The phrase is a twist on an idiom that is biblically based. What is the phrase?
    
Appetizer Menu

Service, Company And Product Appetizer:
Mizzou-ri-fa-sol-la-ti-Doh!

Name a Fortune 500 company, in six letters.
Replace its fifth letter with a different letter to form a product that benefits chaps who are experiencing a particular misery.
The fourth and fifth letters of the product form a homophone of one of the names of the notes on the tonal musical scale: “do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti, do.” 

Replace that note with the one that follows it on the scale to form the name of a commercial web-based service with a slogan that would suggest that many clients of the service hail from Missouri.

What are this company, product and service?

MENU

Bovine Emancipation Salvation Slice (Yanking):
 
This past Monday, November 14th, a trio of cows were stranded on a small grassy outcrop after a 7.8-magnitude earthquake in New Zealand. Rescuers dug a pathway for them and the cows ambled their way to safety upon more settled ground.

A more dramatic rescue, of course, would have involved a helicopter and a suspended cow harness. A caption for a photograph (something like the one pictured here) depicting such a rescue might have read:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _ _ _
_ _ _ _

Fill in those 17 blanks with a rearrangement of the 17 letters in the musical notes of the tonal scale – “do re mi fa sol la ti do.”

What is your caption? 

Ripping Off Shortz Slice:
Switcheroodles!

This week’s NPR Weekend Edition Sunday Puzzle is a two-week creative challenge presented by puzzlemaster Will Shortz:
The object is to write a conundrum or riddle that starts What is the difference between ... — in which the answer involves a transposition of words.
For example: What is the difference between a chatterbox and a mirror? 
Answer: One speaks without reflecting while the other reflects without speaking. Or: What is the difference between a lucky criminal and some Saran with a garden vegetable? 
Answer: One beats the rap while the other wraps the beet.

Change of spelling in the words is allowed, but not necessary. Entries will be judged on their sense, naturalness of wording, humor, elegance and overall effect. You may submit up to three entries. I will announce my favorites — and the overall winner — in two weeks.

LegoLambda’s Ripping/riffing Off Shortz Slice reads:
What is the difference between:
1. ...the title of Donald Trump’s second favorite book (second only to the Bible, according to Trump),
and the recent auctioning of Munch’s “Girls on a Bridge” which fetched $54 million at a recent Sotheby’s auction?
2. ...what grammar school children in grammar class are often busy doing,
and what Robert Potter had to do in 1989?
3. ...what you do so your GMC SUV won’t get stolen,
and what thieves do to steal your GMC SUV?
4. ...something your boss might do along with reducing your company health insurance coverage,
and what you subsequently might not be able to do if you need medical attention?
5. ...what an author might need to do after returning from a prolonged vacation,
and the nutritional information on the condiment bottle label on the author’s dinner table?
6. ...352 for the “End” at St. Andrew’s in Scotland, and 517 for the “Buffalo” at Jubilee Golf Club in Australia,
and the entire amount, everything, as much as possible?   
7. ...things in your wardrobe or closet,
and what might happen during an aircraft industry slump?
8. ...38 degrees vis-à-vis 52 degrees,
and to connive to win another’s praise?
9. ...what you do when you leave a “dinner bucket” or “build fence posts” at the end of the alley,
and what you’re watching people do in the image pictured here.
10. ...the title of an American folk song,
and what resulted when the hyperopic upholsterer mistook the Thanksgiving bird for an ottoman?
11. ...the gilded two-tablet-Ten-Commandment container,
and the promise God made to Noah to flood the Earth nevermore?
12. ...1:45,
and the ratio of bits relative to something with the head of a man and the tail of an eagle?
13. ...a Don Henley song title,
and the singular form of a Tracy Chapman song title?
14. ...what a commuter might do at Grand Central Station,
and what a corporate CEO might hire Tony Robbins, Suze Orman or Jack Canfield to do?
15. ...a person with a zero handicap,
and what is depicted in the picture shown here?
16. ...what Henry Ellenson (see the Dessert below and the photo at heading of this Slice) does when he is fouled in the act of shooting,
and what a “boy” ideally does when he is done with his “skydive.”
17. ...the title of a hit song by Huey Lewis and the News,
and what the words in that title must overrule in order to achieve peace, according to Gandhi?
18. ...what you must do to topple ten pins,
and what you’re watching lightning do in this video?

Dessert Menu:

Higher Than Hoops Dessert:
Seattle Supersonic Boom @ 1,126 ft/sec!
 
The National Basketball Association (NBA), which recently tipped off its new season, boomed into existence 70 years ago, in 1946, the birth year of the first Baby Boomers.

Over the years, nearly 4,000 men have played in the NBA. Each wore a numbered jersey. What was the highest number ever worn by a National Basketball Association (NBA) player, and who wore it?

Hint: My intended answer does not appear in any of the images that accompany the text of this puzzle. That includes the image of the horizontal former Cleveland Cavalier Matthew Dellavedova, #8… and also the image of Detroit Piston rookie Henry Ellenson, also #8, who has also been known to dive headlong for loose basketballs.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!


Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, November 11, 2016

A, E, I, O, U (but why not Y?) November victors; No rigging aLoyd! Alma, Ed, Gabe and Abel; Evil A-Rod? A-Edd? E.T.? Naw! Captions, Clues, Currency and Kryptonite;

P! SLICES: OVER (5 + 4) x 3 x 21 SERVED
(Thanks, PC)

Welcome to our November 11th edition of Puzzleria.

I am still working on trying to figure out the biggest puzzle of all lately… In the wake Tuesday’s election I am experiencing flashbacks from 18 years ago, in Minnesota, and 18 years before that, nationally: 1980, 1998, 2016… I guess every generation elevates its Bonzos, bone breakers or Bozos via the electoral process. But that’s not a very satisfying solution.
  
We feature this week an appetizing conundrum composed by a legend of puzzletry, Sam Loyd, author of the “Cyclopedia of 5000 Puzzles.”

PlannedChaos, unearthed this timely gem and brought it to our attention. It involves tallying votes, albeit on a smaller scale that our recent national vote count. It is titled “Counting On Popular Vote Appetizer: No rigging aLoyd!”  PlannedChaos also contributes a four-pack of puzzles in his Ripping Off Shortz Slice titled “Captions, Clues, Currency and Kryptonite.
Thanks, PC. 

What you need today is comfort food for the brain.


Tuesday’s Dead. Think Good, It’s Friday! 
Thank a veteran for his or her service.
And, enjoy our puzzles, please. 


Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

What’s Up Document Hors d’Oeuvre:
Evil A-Rod? A-Edd? E.T.? Naw!

Spell a musical instrument backward. The result, given the addition of appropriate spacing and punctuation, is a musician’s surname and first name’s initial, followed by an indication of whether he/she is dead or alive, as it might appear on a document.
(Even though the musician is not dead yet, the document may be incorrect... Remember Abe Vigoda.)

Spell a synonym of “marauder” backward. The result, given the addition of appropriate spacing and punctuation, is the acronym by which an armed European nationalist/separatist organization is known, followed by an indication of the “death” of the organization, as it might appear on a tombstone.
(The nationalist/separatist organization in 2011 announced its cessation of armed activity, effectively “putting an end to” its marauding status.)
Spell an obsolete Spanish letter backward. The result, given the addition of appropriate spacing and punctuation, is a brand-name weight loss drug, followed by an indication of whether the drug still exists, as it might appear on a document.
(The Food and Drug Administration has not, as yet, deep-sixed this drug... but again, the document may be wrong.)
Name this musical instrument and musician, this synonym and organization, and this obsolete letter and brand-name drug.


Morsel Menu

Voting History Morsel:
Alma, Ed, Gabe and Abel

Alma DeBlog, while reviewing her personal voting history, notices something curious about the first letters of the surnames of the last four presidential candidates for whom she has voted, beginning with the most recent and ending with her choice in the 2004 campaign. Her four letters spell out a word that is a profession.

Alma urges her neighbor, Ed LaGambol, to do the same. Ed comes up with a word containing five letters, not four, because in the 2012 election he voted for the Democratic candidate in Wisconsin, then voted for the Republican candidate in Minnesota. (He owns residences in both states.) The word Ed spells out is a pejorative term that one 2016 candidate used to tar another candidate.

Ed challenges his hunting buddy, Gabe Omdall, to do the same. Gabe alters the rules somewhat, reviewing the past six presidential elections in which he voted, and using the first letters of his candidates’ first, not last, names in the 2004 and 2000 elections. Also, Gabe did not vote in the 1976-through-1996 elections because his residence during those years was in Leavenworth, Kansas. So the election years from which Gabe’s words are formed, are in order: 2016, 2012, 2008, 2004, 2000 and 1972. The word Gabe spells is a brand name of a product that a 2016 candidate might keep on his person, along with his tic tacs.

Gabe encourages his bookie, Abel Magold, to try the challenge. Able also modifies the rules, using the past six elections, from 2016 to 1996, using four surnames and two first names. What’s more, for some reason, Abel inserts the initial letter of the first name of his 1992 candidate selection between his 2004 and 2008 candidate selections. The result spells the name of an implement associated with a person who was a Civil War veteran, New England insurance and sports executive enshrined in the Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, and Republican mayor, U.S. senator and governor of his home state.

(Interestingly, Abel alternated between Democratic and Republican candidates in his seven presidential votes, beginning in 1992.) 

What are the profession, the pejorative term, the brand-name product, and implement associated with the New England politician? And, who is the politician?  


Appetizer Menu

Counting On Popular Vote Appetizer:
No rigging aLoyd!

The one-L Loyd, he builds conundrums,
The two-L Lloyd, he builds condominiums,
And if there is a three-L Llloyd
We ought declare him null and void!

At a recent election, 5,219 votes were cast for four candidates. The victor exceeded his opponents’ totals by 22, 30 and 73 votes.

Can you give a simple rule for determining the exact number of votes received by each?

At another recent election, 125,543,759 votes were cast for four candidates. The victor exceeded her opponents’ totals by 337,636 votes, 56,172,389 votes and 59,457,124 votes.

Alas, this victor lost the election... perhaps because they just renamed the Electoral College. It’s now called Trump University.

MENU

Planned Chaos Ripping Off Shortz And Stern Slice:
Captions, Clues, Currency and Kryptonite

This week’s NPR Weekend Edition Sunday Puzzle, created by Ken Stern and presented by puzzlemaster Will Shortz reads:
 Think of a sign that’s frequently seen around this time of year – two words of four letters each. Among these eight letters are all five vowels: A, E, I, O and U – appear once each, along with three consonants. What sign is it?

PlannedChaos’s Ripping/riffing Off Shortz And Stern Slice reads:

Supply a caption for each of the two images shown here (one of which might have appeared on election maps this past week, but did not). Then supply a phrase for the first clue below, and fill in the blanks in the second clue:
1. Superman, To Ms. Lane.
2. The ____ currency of the EU is the ____.
Each caption and each answer to the clues consists of two words of four letters each. Among these eight letters are all five vowels: A, E, I, O and U (each appearing once), along with three consonants.

LegoLambda’s Ripping/riffing Off Shortz And Stern Slice:
A, E, I, O, U (but why not Y?)
 
Two of the three segments of this puzzle slice involve the letter “y” in some way. 
Supply a caption for the image shown here. Then supply a phrase for each of the two clues below:
1. Name a sitcom character and the first word of what one of his/her caretakers was called. (The first names of his/her other caretaker and that caretaker’s coworker end in “y”.
2. Name what most Americans do in early November, including this past weekend.

The caption and the answer to the first clue each consists of two words of four letters each.
Among these eight letters in the answer to the first clue are all five vowels: A, E, I, O, and U (each appearing once), along with three consonants.
Among these eight letters in the caption are all six vowels: A, E, I, O, U, and this time Y (each appearing once), along with two consonants.
The answer to the second clue each consists of two words: a six-letter verb and four-letter noun. Among the ten letters in the caption are all five vowels: A, E, I, O, and U (each appearing once), along with five consonants.

Dessert Menu:

November victors

Name a two-word phrase that is synonymous with a “quick temper.” Say the phrase aloud after removing the consonant sound that begins the second word. The result describes phonetic features of the names of two November-of-2016 victors.
 
Who are the victors? What is the two-word synonym?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!



Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.



We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.