Friday, October 19, 2018

A cranberry Saucerful of Secrets; Femail comprising seven letters; Remarkably clever rodents; Finnegan wakes under Finian’s Rainbow; A procession of fruits

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 7!/3 SERVED  

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Remarkably clever rodents 

Name an 8-letter expression for an insanely clever off-the-cuff remark (the kind of quip most of us would think of only as we are driving home from a party or social gathering of witty wordsmiths). 
When you reverse the order of the 8 letters and pronounce the result phonetically it sounds like something certain rodents might do. 
What is this 8-letter expression?


Appetizer Menu


Trials From The Crypt Appetizer:
A cranberry Saucerful of Secrets

Note: We are serving up an Appetizer of Cryptic proportions this week – another ingenious Cryptic Crossword Puzzle baked up by Patrick J. Berry (screen name: “cranberry”).
This is the sixth cryptic crossword Patrick has composed for our blog. We are very grateful to Patrick for sharing them with us.  
Here are Patrick’s instructions for solving:
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (7, 5) indicates a seven-and-five-letter answer like “station wagon,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!)


ACROSS
1. Priest, er, uh, “transformed” insecure nun (6,8)
9. Dance beat with energy (5)
10. Insignia with eagle-star combination? (5,4)
11. Fruit, round variety (6)
12. Game Irishman played with niece (8)
14. Pole position (4)
16. Go looking for new land (10)
18. On the radio, usual attempt to have a discussion (10)
19. Where some things may be held in perpetuity? (4)
21. What soldiers wear in our country, the usual, provided going in (8) 
22. Majority taking over, ends in chaos (6)
25. Inflammation, disorder of intestine – not nervous at first, keeping doctor close (9)
26. Virgin has heart full of innocence, primarily (5)
27. Genre using alien – nice fit, concise (7,7)




DOWN

1. Flicks computer on – is it off? (6,8)
2. State of confusion for 9? (5)
3. One hug may be sufficient (6)
4. Long time after short season? (4)
5. Frenchman has to see apartment (4-1-5)
6. It’s real strange, rare in some cases (8)
7. Acting close in public (9)
8. Using Internet, is able to become genius? (6,8)
13. Crime that I mistook for numbers racket? (10)
15. Agreeing half my life in Nashville’s over? (9)
17. Extremely risque author’s cleverness (8)
20. Top customer is invited up for drink (6)
23. Excuse for captain of industry to support bailout (5)
24. Starting to get into algebra so far? (2,2)

Legendary Listenable Leprechauny Appetizer:
Finnegan wakes under Finian’s Rainbow

Legend has it that tricky leprechauns guard something of value at rainbow’s end. 
Experience tells us that Irish folks greet those they meet – or anyone within earshot – early each day by chirping, in a lilting brogue, a particular expression. 
Find three letters that appear in the same order and form two prefixes. These three letters in the same order also appear in the first half of a six-letter word. 
Each of the prefixes and the six-letter word have separate meanings and etymologies.
But all three apply to three concepts alluded to in the text in green italics above.
What are these two prefixes and the six letter word?   


MENU


Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Femail comprising seven letters

Will Shortz’s October 14th  NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Take the 7-letter last name of a famous woman. Drop the letter “e”. Add an “i” and an “f”. You can rearrange the result to get a word that famously describes this woman. 
Who’s the woman, and what’s the word?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1: 
Take the 7-letter last name of a famous woman. 
Drop the two letters of the masculine pronoun “he” from this name. 
Add three letters: an “f” (the first letter in “female”); a “c” (the first letter in the name “Canary”); and an “i” (the first letter in “Iowa,” the state where she purchased the “Canary”). 
You can rearrange the result to get a word famously associated with this woman. (This word also denotes what the “Canary” is.) Who’s the woman, and what’s the word?

ENTREE #2:
Take the 7-letter last name of a reasonably famous woman. Replace a consonant with two other consonants to produce an alternative spelling that does not affect the pronunciation.  
You can rearrange the result to get a word that somewhat describes this woman (although she is famously known more as an anagram of “reigns” or “avid”). Who’s the woman, and what’s the word?

ENTREE #3:
Take the 6-letter last name of a reasonably famous male entertainer. You can rearrange the letters to get a noun that pertains to this entertainer. Who is he, and what is the noun?

ENTREE #4:
An man who was pals with a president with whom he shared a birth name was a pioneer in bringing something, in five letters, to soldiers via a three-letter organization. You can rearrange those eight letters to get a noun that describes this man. 
What is the noun, what did the man bring to soldiers, what is the organization, and what is the man’s name?

ENTREE #5:
Take the 3-letter short-form first name and 4-letter last name of a not-so-famous WWII bomber pilot and Royal Canadian Air Force officer associated with NORAD. 
Rearrange these letters to get a word that appears to the right of the hyphen in this officer’s title. 
Who is this officer and what is his title?

ENTREE #6:
Take the first and last names of a woman, in nine letters, whose father directed three movies that won best-actress-in-a-leading-role Oscars, and whose husband directed a movie enshrined in the United States National Film Registry as being deemed “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.” 
There is a double-n” in the woman’s name; drop one of them. You can rearrange the result to get a word that describes this woman’s nationality. 
Who is the woman, and what is the word?


Dessert Menu

Be Fruitful And Do Long Division Dessert:
A procession of fruits

Name a 9-letter verb for what food producers might do to fruits. 
Rearrange the middle three letters to form a word describing the fruits after this process is done. 
Rearrange the remaining six letters to form a word for what the food producers might have done to the fruits during the process. 
What are these three words?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, October 12, 2018

A Fortune: 500 pieces of silver; Creepy crawly buggy stumper; Franny Farmer and Zooey; Throw in the tile/vowel (not towel!) for this title search; “Now, for your listening enjoyment, the vocal stylings of...”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 7!/3 SERVED

  
Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Creepy crawly buggy stumper  

If you ask, “What is the focus of your study?” entomologists might reply in two words, one a contraction. 
Rearrange the letters in those words to name a more general term for entomologists. 
What might the entomologists answer?


Appetizer Menu

Unbeatable Conundrums Appetizer: 
Franny Farmer and Zooey

🥁1. Name a confectionary in six letters with a repeating three-letter pattern. Exchange the fourth and fifth letters, and change the last letter, to name a type of animal.

🥁2. Name a type of animal in seven letters that features a double letter. Change these letters to “on” and rearrange to get a brand name for a topical medication.


🥁3. Think of a word in nine letters used to describe what something is named after. Move the first letter to the end to name two types of animals.

🥁4. Name a country. Advance the first letter two places in the alphabet. The result read backwards is a type of animal.

🥁5. Name a movie cartoon character in six letters where the first four letters are the name of a fictional dog and the last four letters are the name of a gardening company.

Rolling Line Of Credit Appetizer:
A Fortune: 500 pieces of silver

Name a somewhat prominent Fortune 500 company in two words. 
Replace a vowel with a different vowel to spell words you might see on the silver screen as the closing credits roll. 
What is this company?



MENU

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Throw in the tile/vowel (not towel!) for this title search

Will Shortz’s October 7th  NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Think of a title for a particular person – two words, 15 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “I”. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1: 
Think of a title of a particular person – three words, 16 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “O”. 
There are only five different consonants in the title. Who is this person?
Hint: The person was a swindler who used a pseudonym.

ENTREE #2:
Think of the alliterative title and first name, and the nationality of, a person in an international hall of fame – three words, 18 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “I”. Who is this person?

ENTREE #3:
Think of an abbreviated title and last name of an elected official and the state the official represents  – multiple words, 20 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “E” (except for one superfluous “occasional vowel” among the 20 letters. 
Who is this official?

ENTREE #4:
Think of an abbreviated title for an elected person, not including a first name – two words, 10 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “O”. 
Think of an abbreviated title for a another elected person, including the first and last name – three words, 10 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “O”. 
Who are these two elected persons?

ENTREE #5:
Think of a title for a particular person, not including a last name – two words, 9 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “I”. Who is this person?
Hint: The person experienced “15 minutes of fame” in the late 1960s, after which (legally) the title was no longer valid.
Hint: Although there seems to be some confusion over the person’s surname, if you believe one of the two versions of the surname, the first two letters of the person’s first name and the person’s surname are the same as those of a Hall of Fame NFL coach.

ENTREE #6:
Think of a particular brand name of a beverage – two words, 9 letters in total – in which the only vowel is “I”. The second word in the brand name is a 4-letter title. The entire brand name is the title of a movie by a comedy duo in which one member of the duo plays a tuba while the other member sings. 
What is this brand?



Dessert Menu

The Artist Formally Known As Prince? Dessert:
“Now, for your listening enjoyment, the vocal stylings of...”


Insert a consonant inside the last name a well-known stylish musician to form an article of formal attire. 
Change an “o” in the musician’s real last name to a different vowel and rearrange the result to form an article of informal attire. 
Who is this musician and what are the two articles of clothing?

BONUS DESSERT SERVING!
Consider the first names “Nathanael” and “Jonathan,” the country “Kenya,” and the cities “Troy” and “L.A.”  What two people who made political news this past week do these names, cities and country bring to mind?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Interior linemen mixing it up; Nameth this Broadway Banjo; Rehabs and habits; Pols, police and criminal chemical elements; Then sings my soul...;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 7!/3 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Rehabs and habits

Switch the second and fifth letters of a well-known product brand you might see at a in a patient’s room at a hospital. 
Add an “f” somewhere in the interior. 
Divide the result in half to name something you might see, in two words, at the hospital’s physical rehabilitation unit... or perhaps at a house of worship. 
What brand might you see in a patient’s room, and what might you see in the rehab unit or worship house?


Tough Conundrums To Beat Appetizer:
Pols, police and criminal chemical elements

Note: Puzzleria! is running a second helping of our new feature, “Mathew Huffman’s Conundrum Set.

🥁1. Think of a modern day humorist, first and last names, with a total of two T’s in their name. Change these to a B and a D and rearrange to name a film musical of the 1950s.


🥁2. Think of an American politician of the 1980s. Insert an H between their first and last names and the result contains the brand name of a modern invention.

🥁3. Think of a slang term for law enforcement that contains a vowel followed by a doubled consonant. Make the vowel double and the consonant single to name a car maker best known for a particular brand.

🥁4. Think of a current news anchor with a two-word nickname that invokes a chemical element. The anchor’s last name contains a doubled vowel followed by a consonant. Make the vowel single and the consonant double to name another chemical element.

🥁5. Think of the last name of someone influential in the automobile industry. Advance the last letter of the last name one place in the alphabet, and the result spelled backwards is a type of vehicle.

Appetizer Menu

Lovin’ Spoonerismful:
Then sings my soul... 


Name a vocal group known for its soulful stylings

If you spoonerize (switch the beginning letters of) two words in the vocal group’s name, the result will sound like two antonyms. What is the name of this vocal group?


MENU

Riffing Off Shortz And Strandskov Slices:
Interior linemen mixing it up

Will Shortz’s September 30th  NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Henrik Strandskov of Luck, Wisconsin, reads:
Name a major professional sports team. The first and last letters of the team’s name specify something that is an anagram of its interior letters. 
What team is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Strandskov Slices read:
ENTREE #1: 
Name a major professional sports team. The first and last letters of the team’s nickname are letters you might see written at the end of a letter. The nickname’s interior letters can be rearranged to spell a word that might be written at the beginning of a letter. 
Those same letters also can be rearranged to spell what the recipient of any letter will likely do with it. 
What team is this?

ENTREE #2:
Name a major professional sports team. The last and first letters of the team’s nickname spell the name of an independent record label with studios both in London and in a state with a postal code that is an anagram of its interior letters. What team is it?

ENTREE #3:
Name a major professional sports team. The first and last letters of the team’s nickname are the first two letters in the brand name of a lubricant. 
Subtract a Greek letter from an anagram of its interior letters to form the second part of the brand name. 
What team is it?

ENTREE #4:
Name a major professional sports team in two words, its city name plus its nickname. The first letter of the team’s city name and the last letter of the team’s nickname are the first and last letters of an affliction (in 9 letters) that would likely be career-ending for any of the team’s players. An anagram of the remaining interior letters spells a medical procedure, in two words, that would probably make the affliction worse. What team is it?
Hint: The story of a past rookie on the team was made into an Oscar-nominated movie, the title of which contains a word that is the first syllable of the 9-letter affliction.

ENTREE #5:
Name a major professional sports team in two words, its city name plus its nickname. The first and last letters of the team’s two-word name are the first two of the three initials of a U.S. president. An anagram of its interior letters spell two words specifying what, historically, some election officials did in the wake of close presidential outcomes. (The opponent that this president defeated, however, did not ask election officials to do this.) 
What team is this?

ENTREE #6:
Name a major professional sports team in two words, its city name plus its nickname. Take the first letter of its city name and first and last letters of its nickname. Take the mirror images of the three letters and sharpen their rounded contours to form acute angles. The result will be a familiar onomatopoeic expression pertaining to sleeping.  
An anagram of all but the first letter of its city name and last letter of its nickname can be rearranged to spell a two-word noun-verb statement about members of the team who, after “sleepwalking” through the first half, come back after a halftime pep talk (by a Knute-Rocknesque head coach, for example) to win the game. What team is it?

ENTREE #7:
Give the last name of a puzzle-maker. Rearrange all but the first and final letters of the last name to form two words: a synonym of “boozer” and a verb for what the boozer did before he blacked out. The final and first letters of the puzzle-maker’s last name, in that order, specify two things: 
1. a designation of a blend of booze in which the youngest brandy has been stored for at least two years in a cask; and 
2. briefly, what the boozer may end up in if he continues and intensifies this self-destructive behavior. 
Who is this puzzle-maker?


Dessert Menu

Bright Neon Lights Dessert:
Nameth this Broadway Banjo

A man’s first name is also the last name of a Broadway-musical star. 
Drop one letter from a shorter, less formal variant of the man’s first name to form the Broadway star's first name.
Who is the star?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.