Friday, October 18, 2019

An exclamation of exasperation; Ad hocus-porcus-in-a-pocus; Better solving, through chemistry; Elementary, my dear Dmitri! Milking the laughs; Just another of your garden-variety comic strips

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Elementary, my dear Dmitri! 

Place the first two letters of an element between the two letters of its periodic table symbol. 
The result is a word that appears in a common idiom along with a plural form of the element. 
What is this idiom?


Appetizer Menu

TestTubas And ConunDrums Slice:
Better solving, through chemistry

πŸ₯1. Think of a toxic chemical in five letters. 
Shift each letter six places earlier in the alphabet. The result will be a type of ground cover.
πŸ₯2. Think of the brand name for an over-the-counter medication, in seven letters, often taken for a condition that, left untreated, can lead to isolation. 
Drop the first letter and reverse the remaining letters to describe something that isolation can lead to.
πŸ₯3. Think of a chemical mixture that can eat through various materials. 
Remove one letter to name an insect that eats through various materials.
πŸ₯4. Think of a word in six letters. 
Swap the first two letters to get another word. Add two letters at the beginning to get another word. Shift those first two letters one place horizontally on the computer keyboard to get another word. 
All of these words are used in chemistry and/or physics.
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Newsy Slice:
An exclamation of exasperation

Rearrange the combined letters in a two-word phrase lately in the news, in seven and four letters. The two words of the phrase begin with a “U” and a “c”. 
The result of the rearrangement is a three-word exclamation that might be directed at those involved in the phrase, in three, three and five letters beginning with L, R and A and ending with !, ! and !. The first two words in the exclamation are verbs of advice, and the third word is an exclamation of exasperation and dismay.
What are this two-word phrase and three-word exclamation? 

Cheesy Slice:
Milking the laughs

Add a “w” to the combined letters of two synonyms. 
Rearrange these letters to form a third synonym plus a word associated with “laughing” and a word associated with “cow.” 
What are these five words?

Riffing Off Shortz And Talvacchio Slice:
Ad hocus-porcus-in-a-pocus

Will Shortz’s October 13th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Dominick Talvacchio of Chicago, Illinois, reads: 
Think of an informal term for a beverage. Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll have an informal term for another beverage. What two beverages are these?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Talvacchio Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of the name of Vince’s and Dominic’s brother. 
Say it in Pig Latin and you’ll have the nickname of a Buffalo Bill in a Bronco. 
What are these names?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a verb associated with submission. Take a noun spelled identically to this verb but pronounced differently. 
Now say this noun in pig Latin, and you’ll have another verb associated with submission. 
What two verbs and one noun are these?
Hint: the noun is either something you wear or something you hold while either producing music or “harvesting” deer.
ENTREE #3:
Think of an informal term for a beverage. It begins with a two-consonant blend. 
Now say it in pig Latin, but keep the second letter where it is (near the beginning of the term) and pronounce the “_ay” final syllable using only the  first letter. (For example, “plucky” would become “lucky pay.”) 
The result will sound like the way that many people worldwide would pronounce an informal two-word description of Olga, Neva or Luga. 
What is this beverage? What is the description of Olga, Neva or Luga?
ENTREE #4:
Think of a one-syllable word that can precede “Scout,” “power” or “-friend” and a three-syllable word for a certain breakfast food that is also a snack food.
Switch the consonant that begins the first word with the consonant blend that begins the second word. 
Now, if you say both results in pig Latin, it will sound like an eponymous name for a hot beverage and the first and middle name of a WWII pilot’s mother. 
What are the one-syllable word that can precede “Scout,” “power” or “-friend” and the three-syllable word for a breakfast or snack food.  
What are the name for the hot beverage and the first and middle name of the WWII pilot’s mother?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a synonym of  “scarcity” – a scarcity, for instance, of clean water, breathable air and ecological awareness.
Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll name an annual celebration. 
What are this celebration and synonym of “scarcity”?   
ENTREE #6:
Think of a verb for something a person might do to something that thrives on wind. 
Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll have the beginning words of a song about one such wind-thriving thing. 
What are this wind-thriver and these beginning words of the song?
ENTREE #7:
Think of a simple one-syllable adverb for how good NFL quarterbacks pass the pigskin. Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll have the surname of one such quarterback.
Think of a simple one-syllable title by which underlings may address an NFL executive. Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll have the surname of one such executive.
What are this adverb and title? Who are this QB and exec?
ENTREE #8:
Think of a noun for a gathering of people pursuing a particular purpose. 
Now say it in pig Latin, and you’ll have an term for a cyber-gathering of people pursuing the purpose of commerce. 
What are this noun and this term?

See You In The Funny Papers Dessert:
Just another of your garden-variety comic strips

Name four major characters from a single comic strip. 
1. Remove strings of five and four consecutive letters from the first character’s name. 
2. Remove eight consecutive letters from the second character’s name.
3. Remove seven consecutive letters from the third character’s name.
4. In the fourth character’s name, switch the second letters of the two words and remove the final five letters of the result.
You will have formed the names of four things that grow in gardens. What are these things?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.


Friday, October 11, 2019

A consonance of clever clues; Tasty easy-as-apple-pie puzzles; From magnificence to insignificance; My county, quizzically... Man of Steel City?

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
A consonance of clever clues

Give two-word answers to each of the five alliterative clues below:
Hints: The five first words in the answers rhyme with one another. 
The five second words in the answers also rhyme with one another.
1. canvas “coliseum”
2. farmyard feed
3. rug retailer
4. sip soda
5. admire Monk’s music


Appetizer Menu

(Almost-All)-American Appetizers:
My county, quizzically...


Nothing in common, but they live there
1. One US state and one country each have non-derogatory, informal demonyms that share no letters, and one letter, respectively, with the respective state and country. 
Give the two demonyms, state, and country.

Unexpected
2. The names of 30 U.S. states display what rather unusual orthographic characteristic?
Hint: the most glaring exception to this generalization is Tennessee. 

Changes of state
3. Think of a US state. 
Change the first letter to the letter 5 letters later in the alphabet and the third letter to the letter 3 letters later. The resulting set of letters, in order, will name another US state. 
What are the states?
Hint: there are two equally-correct answers.

No rearrangement necessary
4. These puzzles, (a) through (d) are designed for those who detest anagramming. In each case, give the resulting state(s) from the stated transformation(s).
(a) Take the name of a US state. Add four letters to the front of its name and split to get the name of another US state.
(b) Take the name of a US state. Add two letters to the front of its name to get the name of another US state.
(c) Take the name of a US state. Add two letters to the end of its name and split to get the name of a subdivision of the USA.
(d) Take the name of a US state. Add four letters to the start of its name and split to get the name of a Mexican state. Then add three letters to the end of this result and split to get the name of yet another Mexican state.


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Large Landmark And Puny Person Slice:
From magnificence to insignificance

Name a tall and magnificent natural landmark on the map of the United States, in two words. 
Reverse the order of four consecutive letters. Change two consecutive letters of this result to two other letters that commonly appear together consecutively. The result is a word for a small and insignificant person.
What is this tall landmark? 
What is this word for a small person?

Riffing Off Shortz Slice:
Tasty easy-as-apple-pie puzzles

Will Shortz’s October 6th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
There are two answers to this one, and you have to get them both. Name two tasty things to eat, each in eight letters, in which the only consonant letters are L and P.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
There are two answers to this one, and you have to get them both. 
Name two criminal activities, each in seven letters, in which the only consonant letters are B and R.
ENTREE #2:
There are four answers to this one, and you have to get all four. 
Name a tasty and healthful thing to eat, in five letters, and three things that are a part of this thing, in four, four and three letters. 
The the only consonant letters in these four words are L and P.
ENTREE #3:
Name a five-letter sweet that you eat in which the only two consonant letters are also the only two in a ten-letter hyphenated synonym of “equally.” 
Change each consonant in the five-letter sweet to the other consonant in the sweet to form an uncomplimentary name you might be called if you eat too many of these sweets.
What are this sweet and this name?
Hint: The ten-letter hyphenated synonym of “equally” might be described as “echoic.”
ENTREE #4:
At a church in which the flock is encouraged to speak the King James Biblical Version of the English language, an usher named Jethro is taking the collection. 
Jethro approaches the pew of a faithfully generous elderly couple he knows well (whose Christian names both mean “God’s Gift”). 
He notices that the hands of the matriarch Dorothy, who normally places the offering in Jethro’s basket, are empty. Both of her husband’s fists, however, are clenched tightly.
Jethro leans over to Dorothy and whispers in her ear a question consisting of four words and 16 letters. The only consonant letters in the question are H and T. What is Jethro’s question? 
ENTREE #5:
There are three answers to this one, and you have to get all three. 
Name a title for a big-deal church leader who “preaches to the pews” and the five-letter adjectival form of that title. Also name a nine-letter word for church-goers who “perch in the pews rather than preach to them. 
The only consonant letters in these three words are L and P.   
ENTREE #6 (enhanced by an ingenious contribution from Violin Teddy):
There are three answers to this one, and you have to get all three. Fill in the three blanks in the following sentences with eight-letter words:
Drinking too much alcohol can ________ your skin. It’s a ________ sign you ought to hop on the wagon and make a solemn pledge to henceforth ________.
The only consonant letters in these three words are L and T.

Dessert Menu


Municipal Moniker Dessert:
Man of Steel City?

From a United States metropolis remove one of two duplicate letters, leaving just one. 
Rearrange the result to form a possible nickname for this metropolis from 1985 to 1989 and again from 1999 to 2000. 
What is the nickname?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, October 4, 2019

“Peeuw! Clothes that hamper!” Title search and switcheroo; Stumped? I’ll “drop hints” later; Sports and games challenges... give ‘em your all! Businesswomen had a pharma EIEUO;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Stumped? I’ll “drop hints” later

What do the following nine word pairs share in common?
local pharmacy
income gap
zinfandel tasting
riot act
bronze tan
drop hints
flip side
our house
pitch in


Appetizers Menu

Drumbeat Of Victory Conumdrums:
Sports and games challenges... give ‘em your all!

πŸ₯1. Take the plural form of a sport. Drop one letter and rearrange to name a scenic American mountain range in two words.
πŸ₯2. Name a popular board game where the first two letters are the symbol for a precious metal and the remaining letters are the brand name of a cough drop.
πŸ₯3. Think of a sport. Move the first letter two places forward in the alphabet to name a participant in a different sport.
πŸ₯4. Name a sport in six letters. Change the first letter to a G and rearrange to name a military rank.
πŸ₯5. Name a five-letter word. Change the middle letter to get another word that sounds very similar to the first word but with a different meaning. By choosing a different first letter you can get another pair of words with this same property. What are these four words? 
Hint: Two of these words are used in a common six-word expression related to giving your all, where the two words share neither their first nor middle letters.


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Money Laundering Slice:
“Peeuw! Clothes that hamper!”

Rearrange the letters in a phrase lately in the news to form three containers: 
🍺🍺Two associated with cleanliness, and 
🍺A third holding dirty money perhaps in need of laundering. 
What are these three words?

Riffing Off Shortz And Baker Slice:
Businesswomen had a pharma EIEUO

Will Shortz’s September 29th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by listener Dorothy Baker of Dallas, Texas, reads: 
Think of a word that has five vowels – two E’s, an I, O, and U. Curiously, every vowel except the “I” is pronounced like a short “I.” And the “I” in the word is not pronounced at all. What word is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Baker Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a one-sentence quotation by a European author regarding the nature of marriage and the sexes. 
Consider two consecutive nouns in this quotation, which together contain only five vowels – an A, E, I, O, and U. Change the first of these nouns to its plural form. 
Curiously, the “I” in this altered two-word result is not pronounced at all, two other vowels are pronounced as like a short “I,” and the other two vowels are pronounced as a word formed by inserting a “C” in the author’s surname and interchanging its final two letters. 
Who is this author? 
What is the quotation? 
What are the two consecutive nouns?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a word for something aviators, navigators and other travelers need to monitor. 
It has four identical vowels and a Y. Curiously, every vowel except the “Y” is pronounced like a short version of itself or a schwa (which sounds pretty much the same as the short versions).  
Add all but the last letter of a country to the beginning of this word to form a new word that has six identical vowels and a Y. Again, curiously, every vowel except the “Y” is pronounced like a short version of itself or a schwa. This new word allegedly and “allegiantly” describes a quality possessed by the United States of America.
What two words are these?
ENTREE #3:
Rearrange the letters in the phrase “piglet hams” to form the two-word title of one of 150 poems in a songbook. 
The “a” in the first word in pronounced as a short “o” and the “ei” in the second word is pronounced as a long “a.”
What two-word title is this?
ENTREE #4:
Think of a person whose full name has five vowels – but no I or U. Curiously, every vowel is pronounced pretty much they way you would expect them to be pronounced. The surname of the person is a possible profession of a businesswoman. 
Take this person’s full name and combine its letters with the letters in the city from which the person hails. Remove one of the vowels that appears thrice in this result. 
Rearrange these 17 letters to form four words: a “piping Prosciutto product” such a businesswoman might provide, in words of three and five letters, plus two ingredients in this product, in words of four and five letters.
What is this person’s name? 
What is the product and what are two of its ingredients?
Hint: The person is a puzzle-maker.

YouBeMeForAWhileAndI'llBeYouDessert:
Title search and switcheroo

A past television show featured two main characters occasionally called just by their official titles and last names. 
Switch the characters’ titles. The last two letters of one title are now the first and third letters of the new name following it. Four of the final five letters in the other title can be rearranged to form the new name following it.
Who are these characters?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, September 27, 2019

Four puzzle-stops on a world tour; Thor9ss 4 you 2 transl8; Performing verbal surgery on a profession; It’s (not) a Duesey! Non-look-alike sound-alikes

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Thor9ss 4 you 2 transl8

The sum of the following sequence of seventeen numbers is 1,626,110. Translate the sequence:
3,121 
6,837
4,112
19
106
389
2,187
311
15,289
61
10
216,787
731,986
21
614,389
21,317
9,168



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International House Of Puzzles Appetizers:
Four puzzle-stops on a world tour

Country alchemy
1. Think of a large country. Remove two adjacent internal letters to obtain another, smaller country on the other side of the world. 
What are the two countries?

Numerogeography 101
2. Insert the designator for the least-significant digit in a multiple-place integer into the name of a country to form the name of another country. What are the two countries and the insert?

Short nickname
3. A large country has a short, informal nickname that shares no letters with the official name of the country. What are the country and its informal nickname?

Unloved in his own country
4. An American author, who has lived most of his life in Massachusetts, is known worldwide for a bestseller that was the first of a trilogy. This novel formed the basis for a 2013 German feature film that was a #1 box-office hit in Germany and Spain. The novel, author, and film are all rather obscure in the USA. Who is the author and what are the titles of the novel and film?
Hints: The film starred Tom Payne and Ben Kingsley (dubbed into German and Spanish). The second novel of the trilogy won the first James Fenimore Cooper Prize for Historical Fiction in 1993.

Autos And Autocrats Slice:
It’s (not) a Duesey!

Name a past world leader, first and last names. Replace the the first and final letters of the full name with a letter that appears late in the alphabet. 
Switch the positions of two vowels in the second name, then remove one of them. 
The result is the names of two automobiles: 
1. the make of a subpar subcompact from the past, and 
2. an informal name for a well-known automotive brand.
Who is this world leader and what are these car names?

Riffing Off Shortz And Lipscomb Slices:
Non-look-alike sound-alikes

Will Shortz’s September 22nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Tyler Lipscomb of Augusta, Georgia, reads: 
Think of an adjective in five letters in two syllables. The first syllable phonetically sounds like a synonym of the full, five-letter word. And strangely these two words have no letters in common. What words are these?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Lipscomb Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a Midwestern city in nine letters in two words. 
The city’s first word phonetically sounds exactly like the second-last word, an exclamation, in the lyrics of a 1970s-era hit song by a singer whose stage name echoes the names of a pair of comic opera collaborators. And strangely, the city’s first word and this word of exclamation have no letters in common. 
And even more strangely, the Midwestern city’s second word phonetically sounds exactly like the final word in the song’s lyrics.
What city and song lyrics are these?
Hint: The Midwestern city phonetically sounds like a two-word name for a room in a house. The first word in this name is the type of wood that might be used used to panel the room, and the second word is a synonym of  “den” or “man cave.”
ENTREE #2:
(Note: The following puzzle is a hot mess. Thus, I beg your indulgence.)
Consider the following sentence:
“A political candidate may harbor fears that the prejudice voiced by his/her main opponent is bogus – and that the opponent is thus actually less prejudicial than himself/herself.”
The sentence above contains a five-letter synonym of a seven-letter word.
The first syllable of this seven-letter word phonetically sounds like a synonym of a second word in the sentence, and sounds also like a synonym of a third word in the sentence. And strangely this first syllable has no letter in common with the synonym of the second word, and only one letter in common with synonym of the third word.
The second and third syllables of this seven-letter word spell a synonym of a fourth word in the sentence.
What is the seven-letter word, and what is its synonym in the sentence? 
What are the two words that sound like the first syllable in the seven-letter word, and what are their respective synonyms in the sentence?
What word is spelled by the second and third syllables of the seven-letter word, and what is its synonym in the sentence?
ENTREE #3:
(Note: the information in the following puzzle is largely phony and faux.)
In today’s world, human joints are replaced using hard polished metal alloys, durable ceramic and tough, slick plastic. 
Back in the day, however, other more primitive materials were used... wood, for example.
Take three words:
1. The tree from which one of the woods used in the replacement was harvested,
2. A word describing the inauthentic status of the new joint, and
3. the joint that the wood replaced
This three-word term phonetically sounds like a three-syllable noun for the soothingly harmonious, pleasing-to-the-ear reassurances spoken to the patient as he was going under the knife! (Okay okay, scalpel.)
And strangely each of these three words and each of their corresponding three sound-alike syllables have only one, zero and one letter in common. 
What is this three-word term for this back-in-the-day joint replacement?
What is the three-syllable noun for the soothingly harmonious, pleasing-to-the-ear reassurances spoken to the patient
ENTREE #4:
Think of a noun in five letters and in two syllables meaning a relatively small piece of isolated land. 
Replace the two letters in the first syllable with three different letters to form a noun in six letters and in two syllables meaning a relatively small opening. Keep the second syllables as they are. Indeed these two second syllables are identical to one another. 
The two first syllables are phonetically identical even though, strangely, they have no letters in common. 
What two nouns are these?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a proper noun in seven letters and in two syllables. It is the surname of a person who has a sports venue named after him.
The first syllable phonetically sounds like a creature in a nursery rhyme. The first syllable of this proper noun plus the first letter of its second syllable spell the name of this creature.
The second syllable of the proper noun sounds like a syllable in the name of the creature’s owner. 
Strangely this second syllable and syllable in the name of the creature’s owner have only one letter in common.
The first name (which is a nickname) of the person with the sports venue named after him is an adjective describing both his hair and the  nursery rhyme creature’s hair.
Who is the person with the sports venue named after him?
What is the nursery rhyme?
What is the creature?
ENTREE #6:
Think of a Midwestern city in four syllables. Remove from its interior a four-letter priest (according to Ogden) that phonetically sounds like a creature that photographically looks like the creature in ENTREE #5. Strangely these two look-alike creatures have three consecutive letters in common.
The remaining letters in the city spell a musical instrument. 
A simple version of this instrument can be constructed by using a simple grooming device and something in which you can wrap sandwiches. It is an instrument that can be played by using particular body parts. These body parts followed by the grooming device form the surname of a puzzle-maker. 
What city is this?
What is the creature that photographically looks like the creature in ENTREE #5?
What is the musical instrument? 
What are the grooming device and body parts?
Who is the puzzle-maker?


Dessert Menu

Pro Forma Performer Dessert:
Performing verbal surgery on a profession

Name the profession of a well-known performer from the past, in one word. 
Change the fourth letter in this word to a different vowel. Place an anagram of the first four letters of the performer’s real first name in front of this altered profession to form a longer word. 
When you place this longer word in front of the one-word profession of the performer the result is a two-word profession that does not describe or pertain to the performer at all.
Name this performer and profession, and the performer’s real first name.
What is the two-word profession that neither describes nor pertains to the performer?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.