Friday, January 13, 2017

“All we need is music, tweet music” Four-score or so years ago; Words on a label? Solve if you’re able! Road trip itinerary? “Why don’t you all hyph-ph-phenate away?”

P! SLICES: OVER (pe)3 – (e4 + p3) SERVED

Welcome to our January 13th edition Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! This is our second P! of 2017.
We offer eight puzzles on our menus this week, including four that Rip Off Shortz. 

Please enjoy.

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

The Hell Of War Hors d’Oeuvre:
Four-score or so years ago

A person lately in the news did something newsworthy during the dawning of an event that occurred almost 80 years ago – an event that one might have described thusly:
“Lo! Torching, war, hell.”

The person’s connection to the event was secured after he/she witnessed something that might have caused her/him to exclaim: “O, these occupy the front!”

Tragically and unspeakably, the event resulted in “a dying in ovens” and cities “napalm-razed.”

Rearrange the 17 letters in “Lo! Torching, war, hell!” to form the first and last names of the person.
Rearrange the 20 letters in “O, these occupy the front!” to form a 5-word alliterative phrase that has been used to describe what the person accomplished.
Rearrange the 24 letters in “napalm-razed,” and “a dying in ovens” to form a 4-word headline that might have chronicled the dawning of the event.

Who is this person, the alliterative accomplishment, and the possible news headline?

Morsel Menu

Paging Mrs. Malaprop Morsel:

The opening sentence of this Al-Monitor article reads:
“US President-elect Donald Trump’s tweet in reaction to the speech by outgoing Secretary of State John Kerry, who sharply rebuked Israel, was pleasing music to many Israeli ears.”
Choose two words from that sentence. Keep them in the same order in which they appear in the sentence. Add a letter to the beginning of each word. These two letters are different from each other. The result is the title of an album of music that was inspired by a malapropism about certain two-wheeled vehicles.

What is this album title?

Appetizer Menu:

Adjectival Part Of Speech Appetizer:

Take the name of a nine-letter college town in a state beginning with “M”. Take the first five letters, spell them backward and place them at the end of the last four letters, separated by a hyphen. 

The result is not an actual word that you can find in dictionaries. But if it were, it would be an adjective that might describe a speech therapist.

What is the college town? What is the adjective that you won't find in dictionaries?
Note: I created the prototype of the “stutter-sign” image above when I was in my 20’s and was on an “art kick.” I had no real artistic talent, so I created graphic crapola like this, mostly in acrylics.

MENU 


Ripping Off Shortz And Reiss Slices:
Words on a label? Solve if you’re able!

Will Shortz’s January 8th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, composed by Mike Reiss, reads:

Think of a two-word phrase you might see on a clothing label. Add two letters to the end of the first word, and one letter to the end of the second word. The result is the name of a famous writer. Who is it?

Puzzleria’s Riffing Off Shortz And Reiss Slices read:
ONE: Think of a two-word phrase you might see on a clothing label. Only the first letter of the first word is in uppercase. Scrunch together the first two letters of the second word, forming one new letter. Remove a letter from the second word. Scrunch together the first word and the altered second word, eliminating the space between them and forming the last name of a famous writer best known as a poet.
Who is it?

TWO: Think of a two-word brand name you might see on a clothing label. Interchange the first letters of the words. “Double” one vowel in the second word to create one new consonant. Replace another vowel in the second word with the consonant before it in the alphabet. Remove a “v”.
Rearrange the final four letters to form a word. Keep the first four letters in the order they’re in to form another word. The result is a two-word phrase that might appear on the label.
What are this brand name and phrase?

THREE: Think of a three-word phrase you might see on a clothing label. Remove:
the first letter of the first word,
the space between the first two words,
and the third word.
The result is the last name of a British writer of romances and short stories whose first name is an anagram of “teaser.”
Who id the writer? What does the label say?
FOUR: Think of a 6-letter word you might see on a quilt or dress label. Divide it in half. Add two letters to the front of the first half to form the last name of a writer. Add six letters to the end of the second half to form the last name of another writer. The writers published books in the early1940’s with titles that began with the same five letters in the same order.
Who are these writers and their 1940’s book titles? What is the 6-letter word.

Dessert Menu

Municipal Dessert:
Road trip itinerary?

Name the next city in the following list of cities:
Cleveland,
Brooklyn,
Minneapolis,
Oakland,
San Diego,
St. Louis…
?
Hint #1: The list is in chronological order.
Hint #2: R, D, L, R, C, R…

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, January 6, 2017

“You’re gonna fill 96 squares” Sitcomedy and tragedy; Can Clemson “stem” the Crimson Tide? Videoversity; A Gray matter of anatomy; A side you can spoon; Conrad Tweety-Birdie?

P! SLICES: OVER (pe)3 – (e4 + p3) SERVED

Welcome to our January 6th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! This is our first P! of 2017.

We offer ten puzzles on our menus this week, including four that Rip Off Shortz. 

Please enjoy all you can sol... all you care to solve.

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Cast Of Characters Hors d’Oeuvre:
Sitcomedy and tragedy

Take the first names of two characters in the cast of a seminal television situation comedy. Put the two names together and remove the consonant cluster (or blend) from the beginning of one of the names.

If you say the result aloud it will sound like a word connected to the death of one of the many celebrities to whom the world bid adieu in 2016.

What are the first names of these two characters, the sitcom, the celebrity, and the word connected to the celebrity’s death?
Hint: The second, third and last letters of one character’s first name are the same as the first, third and last letters of the celebrity’s first name.

Morsel Menu

Sophs And Alums Morsel:
Videoversity

Name a sophomore at a major U.S. university who appeared on national television recently, and who will appear there again this coming week.
Name an alumnus of that same university who very regularly appears on national television, and who will very likely watch the sophomore’s appearance on television this coming week.

The first names of the alumnus and the sophomore rhyme. If you remove a four-letter word from left and a five-letter word from the right of the alum’s surname, the letters that remain are the soph’s first name.

Their surnames are pronounced pretty much the same, and differ by just one letter. If you remove the middle letter from the alum’s surname you are left with the sophomore’s surname.

Who are these two TV regulars from the same alma mater?
Hints: The four-letter word that appears at the left side of the alum’s surname is a synonym of a word that sounds somewhat like the three words filling the blanks in the following sentence: “I don’t buy that breakfast cereal with the bunny on the box anymore because my kids have become ____ _’ ____.”
The five-letter word that appears at the right side of the alum’s surname is a homophone for a bird’s or mammal’s “natural necklace.”

Appetizer Menu

Piece Of Crabcake Seafood Lagoon Appetizer:
A side you can spoon
 
What is the difference between Blind Faith and a particular spoonable (but not-so-much forkable) side dish or appetizer one might order at a seafood restaurant (such as Lego’s Seafood Lagoon)?


MENU 

Tara, Oz And Shangri-La Slice:

Name a fictional place in two words. The last five letters of its second word are the first five letters of a flowering plant that might well help beautify the fictional place.

The remaining letters in the flowering plant combined with the remaining letters in the second word of the fictional place can be rearranged to form the name of the state situated immediately below the state associated with the fictional place.

The flowering plant is eponymous – that is, its etymology stems from a person’s name. The letters of the fictional place’s first word can be rearranged to form a crop plant with an etymology that stems from, well… from “stems.”

What is this fictional place? What is the state situated below the fictional place’s state? What are the flowering plant and crop plant?

Surnominal And Surgical Slice:
A Gray matter of anatomy

Recent medical research that made news this past week was sufficiently significant so as to prompt editors to rename notes in “Gray’s Anatomy.”
The research involved a newly reconsidered part of the body vital to the digestive and cardiovascular systems – a part functioning to regulate blood flow and yet oft defer clots.

Rearrange the 18 letters in “rename notes in Gray’s” to form a possible headline for the news story, in the form:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _
_ _
_ _
_ _ _ _ _

Add a V to the 16 letters of “yet oft defer clots.” Rearrange these 17 letters to form the surnames of three researchers – two from the late 1800s and one from the present – who are most responsible for this medical breakthrough.

What is the headline and who are the three researchers?

Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
Will Shortz’s January 1st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Take the four-letter men’s names TODD, OMAR, DAVE and DREW. If you write them one under the other, they’ll form a word square, spelling TODD, OMAR, DAVE and DREW reading downward as well:

Can you construct a word square consisting of five five-letter men’s names?...

Puzzleria’s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE: Construct a 5-by-5 word square grid. Fill its squares with words that satisfy the following five clues, in no particular order:
Hint: Two of the words are anagrams of one another.
1. AHA calls it “the pulse of life”
2. Prefix meaning threadlike
3. Brand of men’s cologne
4. Outrageously wicked; monstrous (obsolete term)
5. Southern or Indian

Note: The following two puzzles are not “word squares” but rather simple NxN crossword puzzles containing NxN letters with N+N words to be entered into the grid. Again the clues are given in no particular order.
TWO: Clues to a 4x4 crossword puzzle:
1. First word in a seasonal song title
2. Goads
3. Word preceding bill or ball
4. First name (short form) and surname-initial of a president/general (this answer is an anagram of a synonym of “unattractive”)
5. Second word in a seasonal song title
6. Church part that sounds like another term for “mobile device programs”
7. Third word in a seasonal song title
8. Colors hair, or hair colors

THREE: Clues to a 5x5 crossword puzzle:
Hint: Two of the words are anagrams of one another.
1. Fish-trap in France
2. _____-nous
3. Word preceded by “apple pie” or “new world”
4. Honda luxury brand
5. “Stations” where one can “fill up” a camel
6. Invasive grassy weed in Florida and other southeastern states
7. Voyageur vehicle
8. Briny deep
9. First word in an oxymoron describing John Denver, Joan Rivers or one of those many guys that died just this past year
10. “Mars _____ Guitars!”

Note: The following challenge is an Nx(N+1) crossword puzzle containing Nx(N+1) letters with N+(N+1) words to be entered into the grid. Again the clues are given in no particular order. The number of letters in the answer is given in parentheses.
FOUR: Clues to a 5x6 crossword puzzle:
1. Mary and Joseph inquired at the ___ __ see if there was any room there for them (5)
2. Message on a ubiquitous election day sticker (6)
3. Golden throng (5)
4. Synonym for “fairy-like” that rhymes with a word meaning “any edible mollusk or crustacean” (6)
5. Jesse Garon’s brother (5)
6. “I never saw a purple cow, I never hope to ___ ___; (6)
7. Hearty sheep on certain Nordic isles (5)
8. Jazzy French horn player from Jersey (6)
9. Painter of “A Man Blowing Smoke at a Drunken Woman” (5)
10. Rough shed that provides shelter (6)
11. Furlough, for example (5)

Dessert Menu

Country And Western Dessert:
Conrad Tweety-Birdie?

A bird and a color are mentioned in the opening lines of a song composed and recorded by a country & western legend circa the mid-20th-century. The legend’s last name is a man’s first name if you remove one of its letters.

Another country & western legend recorded a song a few years later that mentioned a bird of that color in its opening lines. This legend’s last name is a man’s first name if you remove none of its letters.

There are 11 sets of consecutive letter pairs in the 12-letter name of the bird in the first legend’s song – three of which are sets of double letters and four of which are U.S. state postal abbreviations. (By contrast, there are 7 sets of consecutive letter pairs in the 8-letter name of the bird in the second legend’s song – none of which are sets of double letters and none of which are U.S. state postal abbreviations.)

Remove from the name of the 12-letter bird one of its postal abbreviations and one letter from one of its three double-letter sets, leaving nine letters. Wedge the middle three of these nine letters between one of the remaining double-letter sets, forming a new 9-letter word that is a synonym of the second legend’s first name.

Who are these two legends and two birds?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, December 30, 2016

Jes’ kickin’ back with the Clauses; Man of letters meets folksy lady; QBs square off in 2017; Foretelling a memory; Another nice “mexpression” we’ve gotten you into solving; Ursa Major genius; Linking words from the links

P! SLICES: OVER (pe)3 – (e4 + p3) SERVED

Welcome to our December 30th edition Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! It is our last P! of 2016. So…

Kiss this year adieu,
Loom frontiers anew.
Threads unraveled, spliced,
Puzzles still unsliced.
Plenty yet unseen…
Twenty-seventeen.

We are ringing out ten puzzles on our menus this last week of 2016, including four Shortz Rip-Offs that pertain to fore!

 So, foreward toward our future. Please enjoy this wringing out of 2016 as we ring in 2017.

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Piece Of Cake Hors d’Oeuvre:
Foretelling a memory

2016 was certainly a memorable year. What would you say are two factors that made 2016 memorable?
Here is what we would say: 
1. Donald Trump’s improbable ascent to the presidency; and 
2. The Chicago Cubs’ first world championship in more than a century.

Now fast-forward one year from now. What would you say will be the two factors in 2017?

Morsel Menu

Viva Las Vixen Morsel:
Jes’ kickin’ back with the Clauses

Mr. Santa and Mrs. Sandra Claus invite some old college chums – Denzel and Daisy Sue Doozie from Cowcreek, Kentucky – to their digs (shovels?) at the North Pole for some over-the-holidays fun and relaxation. The Doozies speak Appalachian English.
 
On the day after New Year’s Day 2017, the Doozies are kicking back with the Clauses at their polar chalet, watching the Cotton, Rose and Sugar Bowls on the tube. (Santa pulls for Wisconsin, USC and Oklahoma because they are clad in red, his signature hue.)

Daisy Sue and Denzel had been privileged to have the chalet all to themselves for the past week, with Sandra and Santa having flown back in to the North Pole on Sunday evening from their annual weeklong post-Christmas junket to Las Vegas.

During that week  to themselves, the Doozies had been curious about the sounds of hammering, sawing and bustling emanating from the nearby Santaland workshop/warehouse. Daisy Sue and Denzel had just assumed Santa’s helpers would have accompanied the Clauses to Las Vegas for some well-deserved down-time. Instead, it seemed as if they were getting a ridiculously premature jump on filling toy orders for Christmas 2017.

On the Clauses’ return, the Doozies pointed to the workshop and asked Santa about the apparent toy-making activity still going on within, saying:
“(4) (4), (4) (5) (2) (4) (5), (8)?”
(Each set of parentheses represents a word, with the number within indicating how many letters are in the word.)
Translated into Standard English, the Doozies’ query would have read:
“Please explain, those helpers are remaining at the workshop, manufacturing?”

During their Vegas junket forty years earlier, in December of 1976, Santa and Sandra had attended Elvis Presley’s final Vegas performance, at the Las Vegas Hilton Hotel. After Elvis’ second encore, the audience clamored for a third – ovationally standing, rhythmically clapping and urgently chanting “Elvis! Elvis! Elvis!...”

After ten minutes of this mass importunity, a Hilton security guard approached the emcee and whispered to him pleadingly:
“(4), (4) (4) (5) (4) (3) (8)!”
As in the question the Doozies asked Santa 40 years later, each set of parentheses in this exclamation represents a word, with the number within indicating how many letters are in the word.
The 8-letter word and four 4-letter words are identical in both the security guard’s exclamation and the Doozies’ question.   

Add an “re” to the end of the 3-letter word in the exclamation to form the second 5-letter word in the question.
Another way of saying what the security guard said would be:
“Please, Let the audience know that Mr. Presley departed our hotel.”

The question asked by the Doozies and the exclamation expressed by the security guard 40 years earlier sound amazingly alike.

What are this question and this exclamation?

Appetizer Menu

Laurel And Hardy Appetizer:
Another nice “mexpression” we’ve gotten you into solving

Name a three-word expression that means a “bad state of affairs” or “mess,” or something to be reckoned with.” The expression is a kind of kindred idiomatic spirit with Oliver Hardy’s catchphrase, “Well, here’s another nice mess you’ve gotten me into.” (Indeed, Ollie might have well substituted the three-word expression for the word “mess.”)

Lop off the top half of the final (lowercase) letter in the expression, forming a new (lowercase) letter. Interchange that new letter with the one preceding it, forming a new final word and thus, a new three-word phrase.
The new phrase describes a container you might see around town during the end of the calendar year – one filled with folding money of all the same denomination.

What are this three-word expression and three-word phrase?


MENU 

Reviews Are Favorable Slice:
Ursa Major genius

Name a woman recently in the news whose life’s body of scientific work deserves, at the very least, enthusiastically favorable reviews.
An unofficial mascot at the university where she pursued and completed her master’s studies is a bear.

Rearrange the four letters in a synonym of “enthusiastically favorable” to form this scientist’s first name.
Rearrange the five letters in a synonym of “bear” to form this scientist’s last name.

Who is this woman?

Superbowl LI Slice:
QBs square off in 2017

Find two positive integers. The sum of one of these numbers squared plus the other number cubed equals 2,017.
What are these two integers?

Hint: It is possible that you might see these two numbers on the jerseys of opposing quarterbacks in an American Football Conference playoff game, depending on the outcomes of this weekend’s NFL games.

It is also possible (again depending on this weekend’s outcomes) that you might see these two numbers on the jerseys of opposing quarterbacks in the Super Bowl. 
If this happens, it would be either the sixth Super Bowl appearance for both teams or the sixth appearance for one team and the first for their opponent.

Ripping Off Shortz And Collins Slices:
Linking words from the links

Will Shortz’s December 25th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, submitted by listener Peter Collins, reads:
Think of three words used in golf. Say them out loud one after the other. They’ll sound like a group that was in the news in 2016. What group is it?
 
Puzzleria’s Riffing Off Shortz And Collins Slices read:
ONE: Think of three words used in golf. Say them aloud one after the other. They’ll sound like a deadly “weapon” in a 1990’s cinematic dark comedy, with the first of the three words describing the stuff the “weapon” is made of.
Name this “weapon.”
 
TWO: Think of two words used in golf, a noun and a past-tense verb. Say them aloud one after the other. They’ll sound somewhat like the remorse, in two words, that the school bully might feel after executing a dangerous prank involving undergarments.
What are these two golf words? Name the kind of remorse the bully feels.
Hint: “The Donald was lying two  although his Trumplelist ball was buried deep in a bunker  on the par-5 eleventh hole at Whistling Straits. So he took the _____ from his Caddie (the Donald pooh-poohed golf carts, and instead always had his chauffeur drive him around the course in his Escalade) and ______ the hole by draining a blast from the sand trap for a 3.”

THREE: Think of the last names of two female country singers. Say them aloud one after the other. They’ll sound like a well-established American company that was in the news in 2016. 
Think of a word people associate with this company which is also the last name of a third female country singer. 
The last name of a fourth female country singer, if you remove the last letter, is what the company “was in,” idiomatically, which led to the news coverage.
Who are these four singers? What is the company, the word associated with it, and what the company “was in”?

FOUR: Think of two words used in golf. Put them in alphabetical order, capitalize the second word, and split the first word into a personal pronoun and a capitalized first name.
The result is what might be a good title for an autobiography of a member of a rock group that was in the news in 2016.
What group is it? Who is the member of the group whose possible autobiographical title would echo golf terminology?
Hint: The autobiographical title would also echo an actual book title by Isaac Asimov. Indeed, those two titles’ first three letters would be identical.

FIVE: Think of four words used in golf. Say them aloud one after the other. They’ll sound like what my dad used to call my not-so-powerful, 1970’s-era, front-engine, rear-drive, subcompact, three-door, hatchback Ford vehicle.
What did my dad call my car?
Hint: One of the four words is repeated... A hyphen is involved.
Note: The final golf term in the answer is a relatively obscure golf term for a certain part of a golf club. The term is also used as a verb in golf parlance.

SIX: Think of three words used in golf. Say them aloud one after the other. They’ll sound like a two-word substance used for furniture repair and refinishing or exterior siding refurbishing.
What is this substance?


SEVEN: Think of three words used in golf. Put two of them together to form a kind of camera. The third word is the last word in a phrase a photographer might employ (somewhat akin to “Say cheese!”) when taking photos of toddlers.
What are these three golf words? 


Dessert Menu

Inebriating Dessert:
Man of letters meets folksy lady

Name the title of a traditional folk song, the melody of which you often hear around this time of year. Seven of this title’s twelve letters are consonants. The other five are the same vowel. The title is a compound word.

Take three consonants and one vowel from the title and add a new different vowel to the mix. Rearrange these five letters to form a word for what “The Inebriate” is an example of.

Take the four remaining consonants from the folk song title, keeping them in order, and place a different new vowel in the middle, creating a five-letter noun that the first five letters of the title describe.


The last six letters of the title form the surname of an Emmy-nominated comedic actress. A homophone of her surname and the noun (described by the title’s first five letters) appear in the title of an American author’s well-known poetry collection.

What is the title of the folk song? What is the title of the poetry collection? 
What is “The Inebriate” an example of?
What is the five-letter noun that the first five letters of the title describe? 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.