Friday, February 16, 2018

Sitcoms on Satcoms and silver screen stars; Henry Cabinet Lodge? Amazing Grace Anatomy; Charles Charles bo-barles, bo-na-na fanna fo-farles, fee fi fo-farles...

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1110 + 98) SERVED

Welcome to our February 16th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!
Our featured puzzle this week is another excellent wordplayful Appetizer contributed by our friend Patrick J. Berry (screen name: cranberry) of Jasper, Alabama. It involves a singer, sitcoms, movies, married couples, and a talk show host. Tis a veritable “Roll Tide” stickler about role players.  
Also on our menus this week are a QUARTET ⇩⇩⇩⇩ of “Let’s play doctor” Riffing-Off-Shortz-Slices;
ONE ⇩ “Let’s play the name game” Slice; and
ONE ⇩ “Cabinet fever” Dessert.

So, TGIF: Think Good, It’s Friday. 
And, TPFI: Thank Patrick For Inventiveness. 
As puzzlemaster Will Shortz once said, you can have a lot of fun đŸ˜Š on the Puzzleria! blog.
Appetizer Menu

Casting Connubial Couples Appetizer:
Sitcoms on Satcoms and silver screen stars

The two lead characters in a 2010 movie share their first names with two lead characters in a popular long-running current TV sitcom. Both pairs of actors portray married couples. 
Drop a letter from the sitcom-wife-character’s last name, then rearrange the letters in her full name to get the full name of a female singer who gained popularity in the 1980s. The husband in the movie admits to his wife that this singer is the object of his sexual fantasies. 
The movie and the sitcom both have two-word titles, and both stars ()  in the movie also had lead roles in their own sitcoms. The female movie actor helped create and has occasionally made cameo appearances on a sitcom starring an actress who was also a castmate of the male movie actor in his sitcom. 
One more thing: Change one letter in the movie title, and you’ll get the name of the talk show franchise originated by a host who would later switch networks. 
Shortly before he retired (but subsequently came back looking much different, and appearing in a different format), the movie actress surprised him by doing something to ensure that “this would be the last time (she would) have to really dress up for a talk show.” 
 What are the titles of the movie and the sitcom? 
 What are the characters’ full names in both the movie and sitcom? 
 Who is the singer? 
 Who is the actress who has worked with both movie leads, and what shows are these? 
 What talk show was it, who was its host, and how did the actress in the movie surprise him? 
MENU 

Name Game Slice:
Charles Charles bo-barles, bo-na-na fanna fo-farles, fee fi fo-farles...

Think of five people with the first names Charles, Hayden, Mia, Ryan and Samuel. If you have the right five you ought to be able to tell what they all share in common. 
What is it?
Hint: All these people are sufficiently well-known to have Wikipedia pages.  
Brian could be substituted for Charles,” if you like.


Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Amazing Grace Anatomy 

Will Shortz’s February 11th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Name part of the human body in six letters. Add an R and rearrange the result to name a part of the body in seven letters. What is it?
Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Delete the final letter of a seven-letter word for a part of the human body. Reverse the order the fourth, fifth and sixth letters to form a three-letter synonym of the word formed by the first three letters. What is this body part?
TWO:
Name part of the human body in seven letters. Subtract an R and rearrange the remaining letters to form names for two creatures  with very similar shapes. What body part is this? What creatures are these?
THREE:
💃 Name part of the human body in seven letters. 
💃 Subtract one of the consonants that appears twice in the word and rearrange the result to name a part of the body in six letters. 
💃 Remove the final three letters from the seven-letter body part to name a four-letter body part. 
💃 Finally, remove from the seven-letter body part four letters that can be rearanged to form a synonym for “story.” Rearrange the remaining three letters to form a body part.
What are the seven-letter body part, the six-letter body part, the four-letter body part and the three-letter body part?
FOUR:
(Note: Do not attempt to solve this puzzle before or during dining... or while ingesting food of any sort!)
Name part of the human body in six letters. Add an R and rearrange the result to name a part of the body in seven letters. 
The first four letters in each of these body parts can be rearranged to form the same vulgar four-letter term that is associated with one of the body parts. 
What is this vulgar term and what are the two body parts?


Dessert Menu

Quemoy And Diplomatsu Dessert:
Henry Cabinet Lodge?

Name a member of a United States president’s cabinet who served sometime during the 20th century. Add a letter within the first name to form the name of a country. 
Replace the first letter of the last name with two different letters to form the name of a different country. 
Who is this cabinet member?
Hint: The late cabinet member’s name is still occasionally in the news.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, February 9, 2018

Short work, long play, less stress; Cheeses of Nazareth, chapter and verse; Winter Wanderlove; Litericity;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1110 + 98) SERVED

Welcome to our February 9th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 
Our puzzles this week include a TRIO of somewhat far-fetched Riffing-Off-Shortz Slices;
ONE “Box-of-Chocolate’s Thunder” Appetizer;
ONE “Tale-of-one-city” Slice; and
ONE  “looking-ahead-to-Lent” Dessert.

So, TGIF: Think Good, It’s Friday... and, thankfully, it’s not yet Fat Tuesday or Ash Wednesday.  So, have a lot of fun nibbling on these puzzle slices along with Mardi Gras/St. Valentine’s Eve chocolates while you still can... before February 14th’s sackcloth and ashes kick in.   


Appetizer Menu

Lovetron Appetizer:
Winter Wanderlove



If one turns a blind eye can one savor
The red nevus birthmarked on my knee?
Would removing it curry me favor? 
Does a pier jut out into the sea?
Can DiMaggio score us a run?
Grown-ups groan at a valiant teen pun?
Etch two _____-shaped tattoos on my arms... 
Love, it leaves a lot up to one’s charms.

The verse above is an octet in anapestic trimeter. It has an ababccdd rhyme scheme. One word is missing, the first part of a hyphenated pair.
Fill in the blank. Explain your answer.

MENU

Author! Author? Slice:
Litericity


Name a relatively populous U.S. city, in two words. The second word of the city rhymes with the first name of a famous author and the first word of the city rhymes with a place the author is famous for writing about. 
What is this city?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Short work, long play, less stress 

Will Shortz’s February 4th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
In English, a short “u” sound is usually spelled with a “u,” as in “fun” and “luck.” Occasionally it’s spelled with an “o,” as in “come” and “love.” Can you name two everyday one-syllable words in which a short “u” sound is spelled with an “a”?
Puzzleria!’s far-fetched (and not as good as Paulzzeria!s) Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
In the disjointed English verse below, there are ten missing syllables. Eight are one-syllable words. Two make up a two-syllable compound word.  
The sounds of all five vowels (a, e, i, o and u) are represented, each in their short and long forms. 
All long-vowel-sound syllables begin with the same blend of two consonants. All short-vowel-sound syllables begin with the same consonant and end with the same consonant.
For example, the long-vowel syllables might be: SHAY, SHE, SHY, SHOW and SHOE, and the short-vowel syllables might be PAT, PET, PIT, POT and PUTT. 
But, alas for you, those are not the ten syllables you need to find.
Hint: The two consonants in the blend that begins the five long-vowel syllables as well as the two consonants that begin and end the five short-vowel syllables all appear in the first half of the alphabet. 
“Bobby ____, I ___, cook me some cajun, real hot.”
In a _______ motel room your bed is a cot.
Slang for “home run” is “tater,” “___ ___” or “moon shot.”
Old Man River doth ____. But a ___? It doth not!
I do not want the ___ ___ so give me a shot.
Fill in these nine blanks.
TWO:
Back during the James Earl Carter Administration, some Americans thought Mohammad Reza Pahlavi was the _____ of Iran, while other Americans thought that I was. All those Americans were mistaken, although the “other Americans” were closer to being correct than the “some Americans.”
What word belongs in the blank?


THREE:

Name something seen in the kitchen that can be ingested. 
Spell out the name of a symbol in the International Phonetic Alphabet and insert it into the interior of the ingestible. The result sounds like something seen in the kitchen that can be ingested, but probably shouldn’t be. 
The second thing is often written as two words.
What are these two things seen in the kitchen?


Dessert Menu

Forty Days In The Dessert:
Cheeses of Nazareth, chapter and verse

Place the names of  two kinds of cheese side-by-side without a space. 
Remove from these cheeses a synonym for town. Additionally, remove from the cheeses just the first and third letters in that synonym for town. The remaining letters spell a form of verse. What are these cheeses and what is the form of verse?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, February 2, 2018

Second helping hands of the clock; Shinny up the flagpole and see if anyone salutes; Henry Honda? Joe Pepsi? Channing Tatum Tot? Happy dubious dun-colored holidays! Crazy quilt quartet

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1098 + 76) SERVED 

Welcome to our February 2nd edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 
Our puzzles this week include a SEXTET of Riffing-Off-Shortz-Slices ⇩⇩⇩⇩⇩⇩;
ONE “Gronk-smooching” Appetizer ;
ONE “yen-for-seconds” Appetizer ;
ONE “you-can-dance-to-it” Slice ; and
ONE  “holidays-on-ice” Dessert .

So, TGIF: Think Good, It’s Friday. And, have a lot of fun nibbling and noshing on these puzzle slices in between watching the Big Game’s commercials.  


Appetizer Menu

Super Bowl Blues And Booze Appetizer:
Shinny up the flagpole and see if anyone salutes

February 4, 2018. U.S. Bank Stadium in Minneapolis, Minnesota. Tailgaters pose for national cameras. Security personnel scan crowds for trespassers and troublemakers. One guard maces a miscreant shinnying up a flagpole; the message is clear: “If you attempt to pole-sit, tear gas will be administered.” The security personnel’s prayer is that agitators sleep though the game! 
All about the shadowy peripheries of the stadium, drug dealers push their largest opiates. One customer who bit the bait and got the munchies admits, “I don’t give a whit about sports. I ate a leg, however, at the KFC concession on the mezzanine level.” 
As another security guard patroling the tailgating area escorts a Morganna-The-Kissing-Bandit wannabe into his paddy wagon, she cries out, “I, a topless gater, have rights too!” Alas, her striptease goal of storming the field and smooching Rob Gronkowski on the kisser has been thwarted!

The Super Bowl LII pregame synopsis above contains seven separate strings of words, each which has letters that can be rearranged to form the same two words – words that are pertinent to this year’s Big Game. The seven word-strings range from two to five words long. All seven strings contain the same letters to be rearranged... but, of course, in different order.
What are these two pertinent words?

You Yen Appetizer:
Second helping hands of the clock

Name a food you eat that, proverbially, you yen to have seconds of just hours later. Spell the singular form of this food backward and slice it in two to form two words that might mean “later.” What is this food?


MENU

Dance Hall Daze Slice:
Crazy quilt quartet

A four-man dance band consists of: 
🎵a guy with a washboard; 
🎺 a guy with a trumpet; 
🎼 a guy who embraces a hybrid of a double-reed woodwind and a seven-stringed pear-shaped lute-like instrument as he plays it;
🎶 a guy who plays a high-pitched glass harp consisting of not 25 but 50 wineglasses into which he meticulously pours copious quantities of water;  
 and sometimes sitting in with the guys are two rather mixed-up Spike Jones aficionados (a guy and his granddad) who both “play” airhorns. 
Given the instruments played by these band members, what genre of dance music does this “crazy-quilt-quartet-plus-two” perform? Explain your answer.


Riffing Off Shortz And Portnoy Slices:
Henry Honda? Joe Pepsi? Channing Tatum Tot?

Will Shortz’s January 28th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Stuart Portnoy, reads:
Name a famous actor — first and last names. The last name is a well-known brand. Drop the last letter of the first name and you’ll get the kind of product it’s a brand of. Who is it?
Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz And Portnoy Slices read:
ONE:
Name a famous actor — first and last names. The last name, minus one letter, is a well-known brand. Drop the last two letters of the first name and you’ll get an article of apparel that might be improved by the brand product. Who is the actor? What are the brand product and article of apparel?
TWO:
Name a mid-1990s movie character — first and last names. The last name is a somewhat well-known brand. Drop the last letter of the first name and you’ll get the kind of product it’s a brand of. Who is this character?
Hint: The actor who portrayed the character goes by his first, middle and last names.
THREE:
Name a somewhat famous actor — first and last names. He shares his last name with a well-known sportscaster. Drop the last two letters of the actor’s first name and you’ll get a word you might have heard yelled out during one of the sportscaster’s broadcasts. Who are the actor and sportscaster, and what is the yelled-out word?
FOUR:
Name a somewhat famous actor — first and last names. Insert a period after the first and second letters of the first name. Replace the last letter of the first name with a letter that rhymes with only two other letters in the alphabet. Add two vowels after this letter to form a synonym of “java” that rhymes with only one letter of the alphabet. This altered first name is the name of a 54-year-old toy for boys. The non-punctuated portion of this toy followed by the somewhat famous actor’s last name is the name of a cinematic ape.
Who is this actor? What is the toy for boys? Who is the cinematic ape?
FIVE:
Name a famous thespian — first and last names. Drop the last letter of the last name, forming a brand. Drop the last letter of the first name and you’ll get the first name of a somewhat famous thespian associated with Danny and Phil. Who are these thespians?
SIX:
Name a somewhat well known actor — first and last names. The last name is a capitalized brand. The first name, like the half-life of Carbonbon-14, is like the brand of a box of (half-eaten) chocolates. Who is this actor?

Dessert Menu

Drab Molasses Dessert:
Happy dubious dun-colored holidays!

Name a man associated with a particular holiday; he was a precursor of sorts to Dick Clark. Change one letter in his last name to form the last name of a second man, one associated with a dubious “holiday” that follows in the wake of the more legitimate first holiday.
A third holiday, one associated with a dun-colored mole-like critter, sometimes falls on the same day as as the “holiday” associated with the second man. 
One can imagine the critter, if he could talk, proclaiming, “I, drab mole,...” as he emerges on his special holiday (which has since been overshadowed by the more dubious “holiday”). Remove an “N” from the four letters  that would logically follow “I, drab mole...” The number you create will be associated with the dubious “holiday” in the year 2070. The critter’s proclamation, in a backhanded way, is associated with the second man – the man associated with the dubious “holiday.”
Who are the two men associated with holidays. What are the three holidays? In what way is the second man associated with the critter’s proclamation?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, January 26, 2018

Planes, trains and... hay wains; “Glenderella” story ends unhappily; Drawing Goofy districts; One-stop shopping, open for baseness

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (1098 + 76) SERVED


Welcome to our January 26th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 
Our puzzles this week include a TRIO ⇓⇓⇓ of Riffing-Off-Shortz-Slices;
ONE ⇓ “filet-of-insole” Appetizer;
ONE ⇓ “one-stop-shopping” Slice; and
ONE ⇓ “Goofy” Dessert that is just “Ducky.”


So, have a lot of fun. And TGIF: Think Good, It’s Friday. 



Appetizer Menu

Ugly Stepbrother Appetizer:
“Glenderella” story ends unhappily

“If the shoe fits wear it,” they say. “Shoe shopping? It’s a cinch!” Glen, my pal, said. So he walked three miles to his neighborhood strip mall where he bought a pair of gel insole Earth Shoes – ones that were two sizes too small and one inch too short – and limped home!
This paragragh is about feet, but it is also about three other unmentioned body parts, hidden in the sentence, that share a distinction that feet do not share. 
But beware! There are more than three other “red herring” body parts also hidden within the paragraph that do not share the distinction.
What are these three body parts and what distinction do they share?
Hint: Also within the paragraph are hidden (in the same manner in which the body parts are hidden) three verbs which are clues to what it is that makes these three body parts distinctive.


MENU

Product Placement Slice:
One-stop shopping, open for baseness

Name a trio of products (not brand names) that you can often purchase with just one shopping stop. 
Interchange the beginning consonants of two products and alter slightly how you pronounce the beginning of the third, forming what sounds like three verbs for a trio of base and boorish behaviors that may eventually arise after the products are opened. 
What are these products, and what are these verbs?

Riffing Off Shortz And Arnold Slices:
Planes, trains and... hay wains


Will Shortz’s January 21st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Tom Arnold, reads:


Take the name of a conveyance in seven letters. Drop the middle letter, and the remaining letters can be rearranged to name the place where such a conveyance is often used. What is it?

Puzzleria!’s Riffing Off Shortz And Arnold Slices read:
ONE:
Take the name of a relatively recent conveyance, a compound word. Its letters can be rearranged to name much more spacious conveyances from the past and what users of such conveyances did while using them. What are these conveyances? What did users of the past conveyances do as they used them?


TWO:
Name a conveyance, in two words. Replace the second word with a word that rhymes with it to form a two-word phrase for what a wrestler experiences during rigorous workouts. 
Rearrange the letters of this new second word to form a two-word phrase describing what a wrestler does during workouts. (This phrase consistes of a noun and verb beginning with an F and T, with the F-word being a synonym for “wrestler.”)
Finally, rearrange the letters of the first word to form a two-word conveyance.
What are the two 2-word conveyances? What are the two 2-word phrases

THREE:
Write captions for the five numbered images (1. through 5.) pictured here in the general vicinity of this text. 
Each caption sounds, more or less, like the name of a conveyance. 
What are these five captions and five conveyances?


Dessert Menu

Gerrymeandering Dessert:
Drawing Goofy districts


(Note: This Dessert is not so much a “puzzle” as it is a “goofy” riddle.)
Pennsylvania is the home of perhaps some of the most egregious examples of modern-day gerrymandering. In particular, the border of state’s Seventh Congressional District “gerrymeanders” in a quite “Goofy” manner... literally! (The silhouette of the district, some say, resembles Disney characters: Goofy kicking Donald Duck in the tail feathers.
(Warning: Fake News Ahead!)
A proposed redrawing, however, of the easternmost congressional district in Oregon State (adding a sixth district to the existing five) may be even more egregious than Pennsylvania’s goofy gerrymandering. The border of the proposed new Oregon Congressional District 6 (in bright crimson, in the map below) seems to outline the shape of a critter long associated with the state.
Oregonians, however, are not using the word gerrymandering to describe this new border. They don’t say this new border “gerrymanders” – rather, they say it ____________. 
What is the word Oregon residents have coined that belongs in that blank? Here is a hint: The new word is exactly the same as “gerrymanders” except that three of the twelve letters have changed.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.