Friday, February 14, 2020

Retail sales and Eagles’ tales; Penny lopes across the globe; Devisers of ways to stargaze; Tough-love cross words beat sweet nothings; “Shine on harvest moon, new in the sky”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Devisers of ways to stargaze

Describe either “Galileo Galilei” or “Kepler” with the same two-word phrase. 
Switch the words in that phrase to name what sounds like magnification devices that are used indoors to view the stars. 
What are these devices?
What is the two-word phrase that describes “Galileo Galilei” or “Kepler”? 


Appetizer Menu

Cryptic Cupid FebFourteen Appetizer:
Tough-love cross words beat sweet nothings

Some people like to have sweet nothings whispered to them on St. Valentine’s Day. 
Puzzle people, however, prefer to have tough-love cross words shouted out to them. Shouted out to them, for example, in the form of this twelfth cryptic crossword puzzle created for Puzzleria! by Patrick J. Berry (screen name, “cranberry”). 
Think of it as Patrick’s loving Valentine’s Day card to us!
(Open this link if you wish to access Patrick’s eleventh cryptic crossword, and also to link to his ten previous crosswords.)
If you are unfamiliar with cryptic crossword puzzles, here are a few basic cryptic crossword puzzle instructions:
Regarding the Across and Down clues and their format...
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (5,3) indicates a five-and-three-letter answer like “cargo van,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For further insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!)
Now, let’s get to the heart of Patrick’s Valentine card:  

ACROSS
1. Top director – what he shot is in film(5,4)
6. Letter as it was written, a few notes stuck together(5)
9. Corrupt President’s rage getting old – a bad time in 2(5,10)
10. Mailman heading off, running from dog, for example(6)
11. Noticed spot in grass(8)
13. Could be accepted as NASA trainee?(5,5)
14. Country recording includes two cuts from Haggard(4)
16. Drink in sunshine, hippies!(4)
17. In my opinion, no time for sassy girl to carry on(10)
19. God – Dicky is on dope!(8)
20. Seal or swan, by the sound of it(6)
23. Promises no fails, supposedly having expertise?(15)
24. Or any manufactured fabric?(5)
25. Vulture in ghastly scene, with grave, cut short(9)
DOWN
1. Follow mother’s teachings(5)
2. Our past machinery sorta improved with start of industrialism(8,7)
3. Stack he prepared with love for breakfast(8)
4. Couple having sex upset me(4)
5. What a “stable genius” should have from the start, therefore, according to Rev. Spooner?(5,5)
6. Problem with a shrimp cocktail right off?(6)
7. Late night, curled up with Dickens – not having energy to make it?(5,3,7)
8. A pop singer goes outside for a drink(6,3)
12. Hear scores broadcast – they do go by fast!(10)
13. Sadly, Dapper Dan’s date never showed – it must be rough(9)
15. Prisoner holds it up close(8)
18. Singer has terrible opening – heart not in it(6) 
21. Watch headmaster in class(5)
22. Baseball player needs help reaching second base(4)



MENU

Nuts And Bolts Slice:
Retail sales and Eagles’ tales

Divide the name of a U.S.-based retail company into two equal parts. 
Spell the second part backward. The result is a two-word place the Eagles sang about. 
What is the name of this company?
Hint: It is a “nuts and bolts” industrial supply company. 

Riffing Off Shortz And Collins Slices:
Penny lopes across the globe

Will Shortz’s February 9th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Peter Collins of Ann Arbor, Michigan, reads:
My friend Penelope, who is from La Jolla, went on a world vacation. She stopped in Santa Rosa, Toronto and Casablanca. What European capital did she also visit?


Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Collins Slices read:
ENTREE #1
A 1970’s supergroup from Los Angeles embarked on a world tour, making seven stops. Flying westward, they performed in Peking, Indochina, Dubravica, Barcelona, Georgia, Nantucket and... 
In what other eastern U.S. state did they perform?
ENTREE #2
Peter Collins’ friend Penelope, who is from La Jolla, went on a world vacation. 
She stopped in Santa Rosa, Toronto, Casablanca and Amsterdam. Penelope, La Jolla, Santa Rosa, Toronto, Casablanca and Amsterdam all end with the same two letters that they begin with, in the same order.
Find the following words that all end with the same three letters that they begin with, in the same order. 
You will be provided with a clue for each word, followed (in parentheses) with the interior letters that are flanked by the trios of letters at the beginning and end of the word.
A. Sycophantic, intended to curry favor; (ratiat)
B. Capable of being whitened, ideally without ruining the garment, or perhaps hair; (acha)
C. Word following “That’s” or preceding “Tonight”; (ertainm)
D. Harasser, heckler; (men)
E. Word following “Weather” or preceding “Railroad”; (ergro)
ENTREE #3
Find the following words that all end with the same four letters that they begin with, in the same order. You will be provided with a clue for each word, followed (in parentheses) with the interior letters that are flanked by the quartets of letters at the beginning and end of the word.
Note: Most, if not all, of these words are somewhat contrived. They cannot be found in many (and, in some cases, any) dictionaries. Word C includes a hyphen.
A. A pursuit plied by Machiavelli, Neville, Farley and Murdoch; (ma)
B. Like Lynette, who tried to kill a one-time King; (akye)
C. What many yacht club members can claim; 
(-owner)
D. Like unprepared teachers, perhaps; (on)
E. Quality possessed by a Scottish lake monster; (ie)


Dessert Menu

Shiny Happy Dessert:
Shine on harvest moon, new in the sky”

Take an adverb one might use in a phrase describing a shiny new object. 
Remove from the middle a four-letter noun for one such shiny new object, leaving a four-letter synonym of a verb that appears on the object. 
What are this adverb, noun and two verbs?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!


Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.


Friday, February 7, 2020

“What kind of animal is Oscar?” Grafting branches of science; Bafflers for Learned Solvers; “Oh I wish I were an Oscar lyre winner...” “This film lacks action... Edit! ” Act of Congress, “actor of congrats”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED




Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“What kind of animal is Oscar?”

Change a letter in the title of a Best Picture Oscar winner to a “u”. Three letters of this result, in order but not consecutively, spell an animal. Remove them.
The letters letters that remain, in order, spell a very familiar variant spelling of a similar animal. What are these animals and movie?


Appetizer Menu

Academy Conundrums Appetizer:
“Oh I wish I were an Oscar lyre winner...”

🥁1. Take the last name of an Oscar winning film director from the early years of Hollywood. Drop the first letter and reverse the remaining letters to name a modern device for watching movies and television.
🥁2. Name a recently famous actor, first and last names. Drop a vowel from the first name to get an acronym for a digital file format. Drop a vowel from the last name to get an acronym for a popular New York tourist destination.
🥁3. Name a well-known actor, first and last names, best known for their role in a well-known television series. Interchange the second letters of the names. (For example, “Ted Danson” would become “Tad Denson”.) 
Remove the first three letters of the result, add a vowel, and rearrange. The result will be the title and last name of a character from that same series.

Swedish Dish  Appetizer:
Act of Congress, “actor of congrats”

Take the name of an act proposed in Congress, in two words of six letters each. These words, an adjective and noun, are those that a U.S. president has used to describe himself.
Switch the beginning two consonants of the first word with the beginning consonant of the second word, forming two new words – proper nouns of five and seven letters.
The five-letter noun is the last name of an Oscar-winning actor. 
The seven-letter noun is the last name of any of three people: a 17th-century Dutch theologian or either of two 20th-century Swedish journalists.
Who are this Oscar-winning actor, theologian and journalists?
What is the proposed congressional act?

MENU

Lights, Camera... Slice:
“This film lacks action... Edit!”

Take the first word of a two-word Oscar-nominated film title from the past. If you delete its first letter the result is a verb. 
Delete the last letter of this verb and last letter of the second word in the title. Rearrange the letters that remain to spell a synonym of the verb. 
What film is this?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Bafflers for Learned Solvers

Will Shortz’s February 2nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, provided by crossword editor Peter Gordon, reads:
The actress Michael Learned, who played the mother on The Waltons, has an unusual property in her name. The last three letters of her first name are the same as the first three letters of her last name reversed. The name of what current celebrity has the same property? Here’s a hint: The first and last names each have 6 letters.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1
A Beatle once penned a song all by himself. A second Beatle didn’t think it was good enough for the Beatles to record, so the first Beatle gave it to his girlfriend’s brother, a member of a duo that had just landed a recording contract. The duo recorded the song and it became a chart-topper in both the United Kingdom and the United States, knocking the Beatles off the top of the charts. 
Remove a conjunction from the name of this duo. The result is the name of a puzzle maker.
Who is this puzzle maker. What is the name of the duo?
ENTREE #2
The actress Michael Learned has an unusual property in her name. The last three letters of her first name are the same as the first three letters of her last name reversed. The name of what 300-pound “gambling czar” nicknamed “Bones” who was associated with the likes of Bugsy Siegel Jack Ruby, Nick the Greek and “Baby Face” Nelson has the same property?
Who is this czar? 
Here’s a hint: The first and last names have 5 letters and 6 letters.
ENTREE #3
The last three letters of the first name of a past miller from Minneapolis are the same as the first three letters of his last name reversed. He was a tad too young to serve as a doughboy in WWI but he was president of his milling company when a doughboy was introduced as its mascot. This miller lost the tips of three fingers, the result of his hands getting caught in the rollers of flour grinding machines.
Who is this miller?
Here’s a hint: The first and last names have 6 letters and 9 letters.
ENTREE #4
The last three letters of the first name of a child television actor are the same as the first three letters of her last name reversed. 
She and her identical twin sister work on the same productions, taking turns on the set. If you spell the first name of this actor’s twin backward, the result is a synonym of “goal.” 
Who is this actor? 
Here’s a hint: The first and last names of her have 4 and 5 letters.
ENTREE #5
The first three letters of the first name of a president’s brother are the first three letters, but reversed, of the last name of that president’s vice president.
Who are this brother and vice president? 
Here’s a hint: The vice-president and the president’s wife share a distinction that is unique in U.S. history.
ENTREE #6
The last three letters of a Brooklyn-based Chilean artist’s first name are the same as the first three letters of the artist’s last name reversed. Who is this artist? 
Here’s a hint: The artist’s media include lights, mirrors and glowing glass.
ENTREE #7
Take the name of a woman before she married a billionaire industrialist from California in the early 1930s. The last three letters of her first name are the same as the first three letters of her pre-marriage last name reversed. The woman was an art aficionado and philanthropist, and instilled an appreciation and love of art in her husband who subsequently accumulated a substantial private art collection., which is house in a Pasadena museum that bears his name.
Who is this woman? 
Here’s a hint: Her first name is an anagram of two of the five words in the sentence, “I’ll give you a clue.”
ENTREE #8
The last three letters of the first name of a retired undefeated female pugilist are the same as the three letters of her last name reversed. 
Who is this pugilist? 
Here’s a hint: Her first name has 5 letters.


Dessert Menu

Bio-Branching Dessert:
Grafting branches of science

Name a redundant two-word phrase – consisting of an adjective and plural noun – associated with biological science. Remove the first two and last two letters from the first word and replace a “que” with a “c” in the second word to spell a different branch of science, in two words.  What are these four words?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, January 31, 2020

Pay-back for a ref under siege! Punctuation & Judy turns tragic; Restraining one’s room to roam; Bountifully billowing sales... promo; “It was 19 years ago today...” Alphabetical “imbibery” Transporting lowercase letters across state lines!

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Punctuation & Judy turns tragic

Take the title of a play that is a comedy. 
Delete a punctuation mark and the two letters that immediately follow it. 
Rearrange the letters to the right of this deletion. 
The result sounds like the title of a tragedy. 
What is the title of this comedy?
What is the title of the tragedy? 


Appetizer Menu

Free Falling Appetizer:
Restraining one’s room to roam

Note: We are privileged this week to present on Puzzleria! a nifty puzzle created by Mark Scott of Seattle, known to many of us also by his blog screen name, skydiveboy. 
Mark created a great puzzle involving spoonerization that Puzzlemaster Will Shortz used last  month as “The Puzzle” on the December 29th edition of NPR’s Weekend Edition Sunday. 
Mark’s “Restraining one’s room to roam” puzzle also involves a spoonerism. 
Enjoy!

Switch the initial sounds of (that is, spoonerize) a two-word phrase for something that restricts the roaming range of certain creatures. 
Switch the order of the resulting words to form what sounds like a two-word phrase that restricts the roaming range of various vehicles. 
What are these two phrases?

Common Law Appetizer:
Transporting lowercase letters across state lines! 

A city and its state share a string of consecutive letters in common. 
Remove these common letters from each, leaving a means of transport and what it once perhaps transported. 
What are this city and state?


MENU

Market Share Slice:
Bountifully billowing sales... promo

Name a type of sales promotion that marketers use, in two words. 
Rearrange the combined letters to form two other words marketers use, often in conjunction with photographs. 
What is this type of promotion? What two words do marketers often use along with photographs.

Super Slice:
It was 19 years ago today...

On January 28, 2001 the rock band Aerosmith performed during the halftime show at the Super Bowl in Tampa, Florida.
It is now nineteen years later. 
Aerosmith will not be performing at this year’s Super Bowl, February 2 in Miami, Florida. But the name of someone related to a member of the band will be ubiquitously visible. 
Who is this someone?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Pay-back for a ref under siege!

Will Shortz’s January 26th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Write down the letter C. Beneath that write ENT. And beneath that write a G. What profession do these letters represent? 
Here’s a hint: It’s a two-word phrase – 10 letters in the first word, 5 letters in the second.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Write down the letters ER. Beneath that write LA. What profession do these letters represent?
Here’s a hint: An honest practitioner of the profession deals with “threads,” while a shady practitioner of the profession deals with “bread.”
ENTREE #2
Write down the letters CO. Beneath that write OFFERS. What money-saving methods do these letters represent, in two words?
Here’s a hint: The money-saving methods the letters represent may be printable or clippable.
(Speaking of money, if you remove one of the two O’s, what you wrote is a two-tiered spelling of COFFERS, places to put money.)
ENTREE #3
Write down the word WOOD. Beneath that write G. And beneath that write the word NOR. What profession/title and surname do these letters represent? 
Here’s a hint: The person with the title and surname was elected to public office and served a four-year term at age 34. Forty years later, at age 74 he was elected to the same public office and served another four-year term!
ENTREE #4
Write down the letter S. Above that write LASS. These letters represent a word that Annie Oakley and other such cowgals who competed in the rodeo were sometimes called, especially during certain events. 
What is it these buckskin-clad lasses were at times called as they vied for a rodeo trophy?
Here’s a hint: An apostrophe comes into play during the solving.
ENTREE #5
The six mini-puzzles below, A through F, correspond to the six graphic representations in the adjoining image below.
Each mini-puzzle contains three clues. Solve for the first two clues, then replace the clues with your answers. Then, taking into account the relative positions of the answers (one above the other in each case), solve for the third clue. The number in parentheses at the end of each clue indicates the number of letters in that clue’s answer.  
A. 
kiss (4)
monogram of  “I’m Sorry” singer (2)
muzzle-loading firearm (11)
B. 
Santa syllable (2)
nature abhoree (6)
dirt sucker (6, 6)
C. 
sort, type (4) 
Bubba’s successor (1)
child prodigy (10) 
D. 
word following drum or dinner (4)
Bonn-born composer (9)
Berry-penned title (4, 4, 9)
E. 
platter that is played (4)
platters that are played (5)
advertising slogan urging younger generations to give “groovy” recordings a listen (8, 5)
F.  
what “Lima” stands for (1)
word in a short Holly title (3)
1980’s “hair band” (8)
ENTREE #6
Write down a compound word for particular time periods. 
Place the first compound part above the second part. Switch the first letters of the two parts. That is, spoonerize them.
Given their positioning, these words represent a two-word phrase that describes events that occurred on March 31, 1973 in San Diego and on June 9, 1978 in Las Vegas. 
What is this two-word phrase? 
Here’s a hint: The two-word phrase has 6 letters in the first word and 6 letters in the second word. 


Dessert Menu

Thirst For Juice-tice Dessert:
Alphabetical “imbibery” 

The second word in the name of a two-word drink sounds like a letter of the alphabet. Replace the word with the letter and move it to the beginning. 
Divide the result into two words. 
Use:
1. the first word twice, 
2. the second word once, 
3. a rhyme of the second word once, and
4. a synonym of “precipitous” once. 
Use those five words to fill in the five blanks in this warning: 
“Don't _____ this drink ___ ____ lest it become ___ ______.” 
What is this drink? 
What is the completed sentence?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.