Friday, August 10, 2018

Fanfare for the common ground; Emily’s transplanted ancestree; It’s in Anna’s or Hannah’s hands; Great baseballs of fire? “Squeezing” corporate America ’til it sings;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (2!)(6!) SERVED
  



Schpuzzle of the Week:
Great baseballs of fire? 


“The pitcher hurls the ball homeward from atop the hill at the heart of the diamond.’’ 
Consider three nouns in that statement: ball, hill and diamond. 
Which of those three is greatest, according to the Bible?


Appetizer Menu

Homeland And Hometown Appetizer:
Emily’s transplanted ancestree

Emily was born, raised and still lives in a United States capital city. She is a native (with a lowercase “n”) American citizen who can trace her family tree back several generations to a homeland across the sea. 

Take the word for what one calls a native of that homeland – one of the Emily’s ancestors, for example – and place in front of it the rearranged letters of the name of a tree that is native to that homeland. 
The result is the name for what Emily, or any other native of her hometown, is called. 
What are these two names?

Lushous Appetizer:
“Squeezing” corporate America ’til it sings 

Remove the first letter from the beginning and add three letters to the end of a prominent American company. The result is a singer, first and last names, who appeared in a movie that was nominated for many Oscars. Who is this singer? 
Hint: The letter you removed plus the three letters you added, in order, spell a 4-letter synonym of “lush.” 



MENU

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Fanfare for the common ground

Will Shortz’s August 5th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
These four words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. What is it?
NEANDERTHAL
EMBARRASS
SATURATION
CONTEMPTUOUSNESS
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices appear below.
Note: The number in parentheses after each UPPERCASE WORD in the seven Entree Slices may help you solve them. 

ENTREE #1:
These four words – and one word pair – have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
TURMERIC CURRY (7)
FLUORIDE (4)
HODGEPODGE (5)
HOLLANDAISE (5)
SKIDMARKS (3) 

ENTREE #2:
These five words  have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
ADVENTURESOME (5)
TRANSCENDENTALISM (6)
CUSPIDOR (5)
JUNKANOO (4)
DIAGONAL (5)


ENTREE #3:
These four words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
HEARTACHE (5)
SOCIAL (4)
ADMIRATION (4)
CLOAKROOM (4)

ENTREE #4:
These four words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
METAMORPHOSIS (4)
DUMBFOUNDS (6)
CRYPTOLOGY (4)
TREEHOUSES (6)


ENTREE #5:
These four words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
SCATURIENT (6)
UNSPEAKABLE (4)
HEADMASTERLY (5)
DESOLATION (6)


ENTREE #6:
These five words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
SUPERANNUATES (6)
INSTITUTIONALIZE (6)
COLUMBINES (5)
MISTREATMENT (6)
EXPENDABLE (5)

ENTREE #7:
These four words have a very interesting and unusual property in common. 
What is it?
PLURALIZATION (5)
LEPIDOPTEROLOGY (5)
DIABOLIC (3)
GLOOMFULLY (5)

Is Today’s Date “August” Or Not? Dessert:
It’s in Anna’s or Hannah’s hands

Today is Friday, August 10th, 2018.
Anna believes a day like today is not so special, especially during this month of August in which there are ten other days similar to today. 
Hannah, on the other hand, believes a day like today is quite special; indeed, from her perspective there won’t be another day like it for another thirteen months.
Explain Anna’s and Hannah’s conflicting beliefs about this second Friday in August.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, August 3, 2018

Filling a cuplet five-sixths full; “Those amazin’ metatheses!” Simmernonymous fun in the summertime; Does Penny pocket “citrus and sugar” coin?

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (2!)(6!) SERVED



Schpuzzle of the Week:
Simmernonymous fun in the summertime

Remove 5 letters from what someone sometimes does during summer. 
Spell the remaining letters backward to form a synonym of that word. 
Hint: Rearrange the removed letters and add an “s” to the end to name what might be an impediment to this summer pastime. 
What are these two synonyms?
And, for extra credit, what is the impediment?  


Appetizer Menu

Entrepreneurial Ledger-Domain Appetizer:
Does Penny pocket “citrus and sugar” coin?

Three pennies
A nickel and three pennies
A dime and a penny.
These three amounts represent three numerals – 3, 8 and 11 – that 7-year-old lemonade stand entrepreneur Penny Nichols recorded one morning in her ledger book, either as a debit in red at the left of the page or a credit in black at the right. 
In no particular order, the amounts represent:
1. an expense, paid to her parents, for three lemons
2. an expense, paid to a neighbor lady, for three-quarters-cup of sugar
3. a profit for selling one cup of lemonade, including a penny tip for Penny's good service
Penny had paid for the lemons and sugar with coins she rattled out from the top slot of her piggy bank. She made her parents and neighbor lady sign homemade receipts, which she promptly tucked away in the back of her ledger book.
At noon, Penny takes a break after a morn’s-worth of “toiling” at these “citrus and sugar mines.” While sipping on a splash of her inventory, she proceeds to pool the morning’s cash and receipts, checking to ensure they jibe with her ledger entries. They do.
What is the price of a cup of lemonade at Penny’s stand?
Of the three numerals Penny entered, which two are “in the red” and which one is “in the black”? 
Did Penny finish the morning in the red, in the black, or did she break even?
Essential Hint: There is one word in the text of this puzzle that is the sole key to solving it. A word in the puzzle’s title – “Penny pockets ‘citrus and sugar’ coin” – hints at this key word.

Blank Verse Appetizer:
Filling a cuplet five-sixths full

If you  ____ someone off they may send you to  ____.
You may pay and get sprung though... until you  ____ ____.

Spoonerize the missing words in the first line of this couplet (in anapestic tetrameter) to produce the missing words in the second line, thereby completing the couplet. 
What are these four words?
Note: For the purposes of this puzzle, to “spoonerize” means to switch the beginning sounds of the two missing words in the first line to produce the two missing words in the second line.)


MENU

Riffing Off Shortz And Oshin Slices:
“Those amazin’ metatheses!”

Will Shortz’s July 29th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Mark Oshin of Portland, Oregon, reads:
Think of a familiar two-word phrase in 8 letters – with 4 letters in each word. The first word starts with M. Move the first letter of the second word to the end and you’ll get a regular 8-letter word, which, amazingly, other than the M, doesn’t share any sounds with the original two-word phrase. What phrase is it?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Oshin Slices read: 
ENTREE #1:
Think of a somewhat familiar 8-letter noun. Move the fifth letter to the end and you’ll get, amazingly, a synonym of the 8-letter noun. What synonyms are these?

ENTREE #2:
Think of a not-so-familiar two-word phrase – with 4 letters in each word – that might characterize an angry mob’s motivation. The first word starts with M, the second with an R. Move the R to the end and you’ll get a regular 8-letter word which, not-so-amazingly, is a noun naming the subtly manipulative role a mob’s ringleader might play in stirring up of the mob’s emotions. 
What phrase is it? What noun is it?

ENTREE #3:
“We ____ ____ make it our personal responsibility.”
“You ____ ____ decide in your heart how much to give.” 
“We have never preached violence, except the violence of love ... that we ____ ____ do to ourselves to overcome our selfishness and such cruel inequalities among us.”
Think of a not-so-familiar two-word phrase with 4 letters in each word that fills in the two blanks in each of the three quotations above  which were, in no particular order, spoken by Archbishop Oscar Romero of San Salvador in a homily, spoken by President Ronald Reagan in a radio address, and written by St. Paul (or perhaps his trusted sidekick Timothy), in the Second Epistle to the Corinthians (New Living Translation). 
The first word in the phrase starts with M. Move the first letter of the second word to the end and you’ll get a regular 8-letter noun, which, not-so-amazingly, was sported by neither Romero nor Reagan but was likely sported by Paul according to iconography (the jury is still out on Timothy).  
What phrase is it? 
What did Reagan and Romero not sport that Paul did and Timothy might have sported?

ENTREE #4:
Think of two 4-letter words: 
1. A feature of a horse that judges consider during showmanship events at horse shows, and 
2. What judges do regarding that feature.  
The first word starts with an M, the second with an R. 
Move the first letter of the second word to the end and you’ll get a regular 8-letter singular noun which, not-at-all-amazingly, does not pertain to horses but does sometimes pertain to “lions and tigers and bears, oh...!” (oh well, you know how it ends... and it doesn’t end well!). 
What 8-letter noun is this?

ENTREE #5:
Take the letters in the first and last names of a puzzlemaker who is an apparent fan of the Tour de France (or perhaps of the ballet or gymkhana) who hails from the Great Northwest. 
(My thanks to ron for the Tour de France insight.)  
Rearrange these letters to form a 2-word phrase that indicates something that largely doesn’t exist (at least where tonsure is practiced – as it was at Erfurt, Germany during the early 16th century)
Who is this Great Northwesterner?
Hint: I just became aware of this puzzlemaker less than a week ago. 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, July 27, 2018

“Phonetickling” human body parts; To crack a 40% solution, concentrate! Shifting out of drive and into park, yet still driving; Yoko, John, heavy metal, and gin-swilling rock groups!

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (2!)(6!) SERVED 


Schpuzzle of the Week:
Yoko, John, heavy metal, and gin-swilling rock groups!

We are serving up a special treat as our Schpuzzle of the Week – another delicious and ingenious Cryptic Crossword Puzzle whipped up by Patrick J. Berry (screen name: “cranberry”), a talented and valued friend of Puzzleria! 
This is the fifth wonderful cryptic crossword Patrick has composed for our blog, and he and I both agree it may be his finest yet... and that’s sayin’ sumthin’. These creations of his are each a unique work of “wordplayfully” puzzling art, and we are very grateful to Patrick for sharing them with us.  
Here are instructions for solving:
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like
“jalopy,” (7, 5) indicates a seven-and-five-letter answer
like “station wagon,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter
hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers.)


ACROSS

1.  Live with noise and somehow cope with fear? John and Yoko wouldn’t stand for it! 
(3-2,3,5)
10. Not the first to complain – ultimate burden with age (5) 
11. One probably not goin’ to get caught in disguise? (9)
12. Forget the money (7)
13. Item ordered at deli (6) 
15. Special place I go to – sorry (10)
16. Piece of meat to have cut (4)
18. Lead, a male part – first one (4)
20. Candy making belly look funny tucked inside pants? (10)
23. Girl meets sailor in film (6)
24. A tenor’s drunk, first of many for new conductor (7)
26. Minor takes prize for getting attention (9)
27. Sweet? Wrong, sweetheart! (5)
28. Member of 9 breaks kid’s heart getting loaded (5,8) 

DOWN

2. Grass or peat’s spread around (7)
3. Can soldier turn one on firing? (8)
4. Find her and get awfully scared (10)
5. Run one marathon (4)
6. Young flier to have injured leg going in? (6)
7. Smart to leave, having initial apathy for the city (7)
8. Ready to go, but says he’s afraid to fly (5,2,1,5)
9. Legendary rock group swilling gin in fancy automobile – some tipsy individuals! (7,6)
14. Clever handling of a mild topic (10)
17. Horrific beast in a horror movie (8)
19. Sailor started lunch digging into first-rate shellfish (7)
21. Dressed, given time – casual shirt put on to go outside (7)
22. Play a little heavy metal, perhaps (6)
25. Assistant in the big organization? (4)

Appetizer Menu

“That Athlete Sure Can Elevate!” Appetizer:
Shifting out of drive and into park, yet still driving 

Rearrange the letters of a brand name product you drive to form two words: 
1. a place where the product might temporarily be “parked,” and 
2. the last name of an athlete known for his scoring drives. 
What is this brand name?

French Class: Sick Conduct Or Simple Familiarity? Appetizer:
To crack a 40% solution, concentrate!

Divide a famous classical conductor’s last name into its two syllables.  
“Horn” a French article in between them to form about 40 percent, more or less, of something very familiar to the conductor. 
Who is this conductor?


MENU

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
“Phonetickling” human body parts

Will Shortz’s July 22nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Name two parts of the human body. Say them out loud one after the other. The result, phonetically, will name something delicious to eat, in 7 letters. What is it?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read: 
ENTREE #1:
Name two parts of the human body. Replace the first letter of the first part with the letter following it in the alphabet and replace the last two letters of the second part with a D to form a new word, in 11 letters, associated with something delicious (and vegan-friendly) to eat that includes body parts... including arms, legs and a head. What is it?
Hint/Extra Credit: The first two letters of the first body part followed by the last two letters of the second form a third body part. What is this third body part?
ENTREE #2:
Name two parts of the human body. Say them out loud one after the other. 
The result, phonetically, will name a military slang word associated with obsequious behavior, in 9 letters. What is it?
ENTREE #3:
Name two plural parts of the human body. Between them place a third body part that is more commonly associated with non-humans. Say these three body parts out loud one after the other. The result, phonetically, will name a delicious snack, in 8 letters. What is it? 
ENTREE #4:
Name two parts of the human body. Place between them the last word of a delicious but non-vegan-friendly 3-word main course one might order from a menu. 
Say these three words out loud one after the other. 
The result, phonetically, will name something delicious to eat, in 12 letters, that comes in a wrapper. What is it?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, July 20, 2018

“Pie? Though I’m partial to peach, to each culture its own” Professional groomers' toolbox; Mourning becomes Electra? Wendy becomes the Windy City! A fifth and a four, an unknown, but no more

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (2!)(6!) SERVED


Schpuzzle of the Week:
“Pie? Though I’m partial to peach, to each culture its own”

Name a kind of pie. 
Remove the first letter and insert a space to name an ingredient in certain traditional Japanese, Chinese, and Hawaiian dishes, but also in some Peruvian, Italian and French dishes. 
What kind of pie is this?


Appetizers

A  “Blank” Verse Appetizer:
A fifth and a four, an unknown, but no more

Fill in the two blanks in the quatrain below. Explain your choices.

Fifth but not five, 
Not the fourth, instead four,
_______, not _____... 
There aren't any more.



LaNoisseforp Appetizer:
Professional groomers’ toolbox


Certain grooming tools have been sometimes pitched by somewhat famous people involved in a certain profession. 
Spell the 6-letter profession backward to name other tools used for maintaining the efficiency of some of these tools. 
What is the profession? 
What are these maintenance tools?


MENU

Riffing Off Shortz And Weisz Slices:
Mourning becomes Electra? Wendy becomes the Windy City

Will Shortz’s July 15th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, from Sandy Weisz of Chicago, reads:
Name a famous person from Chicago — first and last names. The last name ends in an E. 
Change the E to an I and rearrange the letters in just the last name to get a famous actor — whose first name is the same as the first person’s. 
Who are these people?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Weisz Slices read: 
ENTREE #1:
Name a person from Chicago who is famous in certain circles — first and last names. Rotate the last letter of the last name 90 degrees to form a new letter. Insert two of those letters after the second letter in the last name, then delete the original letter you rotated from the end. 
Replace the first letter of the last name with the letter that is the same distance from the beginning (or the end) of the alphabet (see the Letter Pairs that are Equidistant from the Ends (or the Middle) of the Alphabet chart). The result is the last name of a person whose first name is the same as the first person’s. 
Who are these people?
ENTREE #2:
Name a well-known person from a southwestern state — first and last names. 
Change the I in the last name to an E and add an L, then rearrange the letters in just the last name to get the last name of a character  — whose first name is the same as the famous person’s. 
Both this person and this character (who is portrayed by a well-known actor) have been described as “mavericks.”
Who is this person and what is the name of the character?
ENTREE #3:
Name a famous public servant born in Chicago  — first and last names. Change the first letter of the last name to get the last name of a famous Chicago-born broadcasting pioneer. 
The first name of the public servant is the same as the first name of a king whose story was written more than four centuries ago. 
The first name of the broadcasting pioneer is the same as the first name of a king whose story has yet to be written. 
Who are these people? 
ENTREE #4:
Name a somewhat famous person from a western state  — first and last names.  Rearrange the letters in just the last name to get the last name of a somewhat famous actor/comedian — whose first name begins with the same letter as the first person’s first name. 
Who are these people?
Hint: A pair of other men with those first names are associated with achieving sobriety 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.