Friday, June 23, 2017

The ladies or the sniper, or an egg? The non-flight from the Phoenix; Bluejay Greenberg... is he Polish? Corpuscle Christi?

P! SLICES: OVER (87 + 654) SERVED


Welcome to our June 23 edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 

This week we again feature a clever and cultured puzzle created by Mark Scott of Seattle (also known as “skydiveboy,” his online screen name). 

Mr. Scott’s contribution is an Hors d’Oeuvre titled “Bluejay Greenberg... is he Polish?” 
We thank Mark for sharing with us this well-polished puzzle that involves a Polish composer.

Also on this week’s menus are:
1. A half-dozen somewhat unmanageable Ripping-Off-Shortz Slices, 
2. A Dessert that just never manages to take-off, and
3. An Appetizer that somehow manages to juxtapose Frank Stockton with Monty Hall!

So, spit-polish the nib of your ballpoint pen. Choose to solve one (or more) of not just two or three but of all nine of our offerings. 

No need to dress up in outlandish costumes and act like a greedy yahoo who yells to attract the attention of Mr. Hall.
All you need do is enjoy. So, please do. 

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Homophonic Opus Hors d’Oeuvre:
Bluejay Greenberg... is he Polish?

What do you call sixty minutes contemplating the music of a famous Polish composer? 
Hint: The answer is a homophone. 

Appetizer Menu

Homophonic And Sometimes Hyphenated Appetizer:
The ladies or the sniper, 
or an egg? 


Easter egg? Helen? Snipe? Bonnie? Choose just one.

The short paragraph above hints at a two-word phrase that has lately been in the news. You might sometimes see the two words written as a single hyphenated word.

What is this phrase? Who has lately been using it? 
Hint: the answer involves a homophone.
  
MENU 

Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
Corpuscle Christi?

Will Shortz’s June 18 NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
Think of a familiar two-word phrase starting with T and ending with S, in which the interior letters name part of the human body. Remove the first and last letters of that word, and what remains will name another part of the human body. What’s the phrase, and what are the body parts? 

Puzzleria’s Riffing/Ripping Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Think of a 6-letter word for a human body part and its 5-letter synonym. Place the letters T and E consecutively within the 6-letter word, then remove the word’s initial letter to form a new 7-letter word. 
All examples of this 7-letter word are made up of at least one of the 5-letter synonyms.   
What is the 6-letter body part, its 5-letter synonym and the new 7-letter word?
Hint #1: All but one of the synonym’s letters appear in the “new word.
Hint #2: Although all examples of the 7-letter word contain at least one 5-letter synonym for the body part, no examples of the 7-letter word contain any 6-letter body parts.
Hint #3: The 6-letter body parts are sometimes used to calculate the 7-letter words.  
TWO:
Consider the following dozen parts of the human body, which are listed below in alphabetical order:
arm; flesh; groin; incisors; instep; intestines; knuckle; lens; nerve; stomach; toe; torso
Group the twelve words into six pairs of two words each, leaving no space between the two words. If you do this correctly, you will be able to see 18 parts of the body spelled out – the twelve on the above list, plus six new ones. What are these six new body parts?
Note: There are six different possible paths to solving this puzzle. 
THREE:
A. Name an abbreviation you might see in a dateline. Add two letters, one at the beginning and one at the end, to form a body part you need in order to see the abbreviation.
What is the abbreviation? What is the body part? 
FOUR:
This Rip-Off ought to be as easy as ABC.
A trio of three-word phrases end with the words Act, Board and Commission. All three phrases have the same first word (which begins with an S) and second word (which ends with an s).
Remove the first three letters of the first word and final three letters of the second word. The five interior letters that remain spell out the plural form of a body part. Remove the first and final letters from that body part to form a non-word that is a homophone of what the body part helps people do.
What are these three three-word phrases?
FIVE:
Think of a word for a familiar punctuation mark in which four interior letters, in order, name human body parts. Rearrange the remaining letters to spell objects that are integral to a hospitable regional tradition. The body parts are essential to a mark of affection that often accompanies the tradition.
What are the body parts, the punctuation mark, the objects integral to the regional tradition, and the mark of affection?
Hint: Rearrange the letters in a two-word rudimentary description of the punctuation mark to form a two-word somewhat redundant description of the Lut, Mojave, Sonoran, and Sahara.
SIX:
Consider the two following strands of letters:
SIEKUKERITSIEVICSRAKES
PNCNCLGONETNRENIOGNLN

The two strands are related to each other in a particular way.
Can you explain how they are related?



Dessert Menu

Low Density Dessert:
The non-flight from the Phoenix

Overheard on a recent (June 20) Southwest Airlines Flight – WN 1802, non-stop from Phoenix to MSP Airport in Minnesota’s Twin Cities:
Attention Southwest Airlines passengers. This is your captain Frank Towns speaking.
You’ve heard of the Flight of the Phoenix? Well, this was supposed to have been the flight from the Phoenix. But it is just not to be. There will be no rising from the ashes today... even though it would not surprise me if our runway and tarmac were a hotbed of smoldering ashes!

I regret to inform you that the hot  ___ __________ we are experiencing are so extreme that the density of the atmosphere is simply too low for our aircraft’s wings to generate sufficient lift for successful take-off. We thus regret to inform you that today’s flight has been cancelled. We apologize for the inconvenience, but must insist that you depart the cabin and return to the airport and perhaps eventually to a motel... At least they are ___ ___________!

Your mission – if you choose to accept it – is to fill in both two-word sets blanks in the text of the airline captain’s comment to the passengers.
The first, shorter, words in both sets are identical. A multisyllabic synonym of this word appears in the text of Captain Towns’ comments.
The second, longer, words in both sets share only their first nine letters. The word in the first set contains ten letters; the word in the second set contains eleven letters.
What two two-word phrases belong in the blanks?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, June 16, 2017

Push the framboises, can the krieks Chowing down from fine china; Knotty webs, Fiery hotbeds, Lewder misogynists! Zebra leg fell, Ascend bad bee, Sum joy!

P! SLICES: OVER (76 + 543) SERVED

Welcome to our June 16th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

We are serving up half a dozen puzzles this week, three of which are Rip/Riff-offs of Will Shortz’s NPR puzzle about “Benjamin, the Greenpeace ombudsman...”

Also on our menus are:
4. An uplifting Hors d’Oeuvre that we hope brings you “sum joy,”
5. A downcasting Appetizer that connotes negativity, and
6. A down-chowing Dessert.

So, lift up your spirits by chowing down on our challenges. Cast down all negativity, connoted or otherwise.
In other words, please enjoy our puzzles. 

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Seven (Plus One) Deadly Synonyms Hors d’Oeuvre:
Zebra leg fell, Ascend bad bee, Sum joy!
Solve each of the eight clues below. Rearrange the letters of each solution to form eight terms that are more-or-less synonymous. One term contains two words; the others all contain one word.
The number in parentheses after each clue indicates the number of words in the solution you must rearrange to form the synonymous terms.
1. Leg (2)
2. A way to find a sum (1)
3. Ascend (1)
4. Norman Fell (2)
5. What a “zebra” may throw down on the field when a second infraction occurs during one play from scrimmage (2)
6. “No one likes being a ______ __ bad tidings” (2)
7. Word preceding “Joy” (1)
8. “The ________ kindled a ___­­_ in his bee smoker.” (2)


Appetizer Menu

Negative Con Notations Appetizer:
Knotty webs, Fiery hotbeds, Lewd misogynists!

“Fire, knots, hotbed, lewder, misogynist, webs.”


Each of the six words (listed alphabetically in bold print above) can have negative connotations.

Group them into three 2-word pairs.
Rearrange the letters in each pair to form the ending words of the title of: 
One movie and two television shows.
The three titles all begin with the same word, a word normally understood to have positive connotations.
What is this word? What are the three titles?


MENU 

Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
Push the framboises, can the krieks

Will Shortz’s June 11th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Consider this sentence: Benjamin, the Greenpeace ombudsman in the panorama, was charmed by the chinchilla fragrance.” 
The sentence contains seven words of seven or more letters. They have something very unusual in common. What is it, and can you think of an eighth word with the same property?

Puzzleria’s Riffing/Ripping Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Consider this sentence: “Benjamin, the Greenpeace ombudsman in the panorama, was charmed by the fragrant chinchilla.” The sentence contains seven words of seven or more letters. They have something somewhat unusual in common. 
What is it, and can you think of an eighth word of seven or more letters with the same property?
TWO:
Consider this sentence: “The new hotshot brewer upped the output of framboises and nixed all sales of kriek beer; indeed no holdovers from that foregone era remained.” The sentence contains four words of eight or more letters. They have something very unusual in common. 
What is it, and can you think of a fifth word with the same property?
THREE:
Consider this sentence: “Freelance yeomen chaired a probe into how a gabion, built by Latinos to divert the Rio flood, broke.” The sentence contains five words of six or more letters. They have something reasonably unusual in common. 
What is it, and can you think of a sixth word with the same property?


Dessert Menu

Petunia Pigs Out Dessert:
Chowing down from fine china

“Mabel misplaced her pet Petunia’s food dish, so had to pour Petunia’s food into a piece of fine china from her sideboard!”

That piece of china and Petunia’s pet food brand name each contain two words. Their first words are the same. Their second words are different but share something in common.
What are the pet food name and piece of china?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, June 9, 2017

Faces in the “Loud Family”crowd; Topsy-turvy global history mystery; Jersey’s Christie! It’s Saintly Lewis! “I’ve just seen a face” Cap city tourist traps

P! SLICES: OVER (76 + 543) SERVED
  
Welcome to our June 9th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

Most every week, we run a few “Ripping Off Shortz” puzzles as an homage to puzzlemaster Will Shortz’s NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle from the previous Sunday.

This week we also pay homage to the excellent “Ferris Wheel/Paris Deal” puzzle that appeared in last week’s Puzzleria! The puzzle was composed and contributed by Mark Scott of Seattle (screen name: skydiveboy). You will find our 5 “Rip-Offs” of Mark’s puzzle just below our main MENU, and just above our 4 Will Shortz Rip-Offs.  


Also on our menus this week are these 3 lip-smackers:
1. An Octo-Puss Hors d’Oeuvre,
2. An Appetizer that turns the world upside-down, and
3. A Two-Faced Fab-Four Dessert.

So, try tying together the strands of our nine rip-offs paying homage to our favorite “Ripcorder” and to our favorite “Puzzlermaster.” 
Please enjoy all 12 of this week’s puzzles. 

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Octo-Puss Hors d’Oeuvre:
Faces in the “Loud Family” crowd

Identify just one of the eight people whose faces appear in this image and you will have identified all eight!
Give the name and the number of the person you chose.
Extra Credit Bonus Points!:
Name just one of the remaining seven people in the image. (If Lego were solving this puzzle, he would have received no Extra Credit Bonus Points whatsoever for this question! He is not good with placing names with faces.)
  
Appetizer Menu

Uppercase Place Appetizer:
Topsy-turvy global history mystery

Take a shorthand name for a historical global event. Turn the first letter topsy-turvy, then slash it with a vertical “knife stroke” into two equal parts. Move one of those parts to the right of the second letter, keeping the other one where it is. Place duplicates of the final two letters at the beginning of this result and connect them with a horizontal line segment. Add a similar segment to each of the two “equal parts” flanking the original second letter.

The result is the name of a place that played a key role in the United States’ participation in the event.
What is this historical global event?
What is the name of the place?
Note: All letters in the name of the place are in UPPERCASE LETTERS.


MENU 

Ripping Off Mark Slices:
Cap city tourist traps

Mark Scott’s June 2nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
Name two world capital cities. Think of two words that could describe a bargain holiday in the first city and then find two words that rhyme with those words and describe a well-known tourist attraction in the second city.
What are they?
The answer: Paris deal, and “The Eye” (a big Ferris wheel, in London)

Puzzleria’s Riffing/Ripping Off Mark Slices read:
ONE:
Name a world capital city that is chock-full of tourist attractions. Think of three words (of 2, 2, and1 syllables, beginning with S, C and D) that identify the significance of the year 1512 as it pertains to a particular tourist attraction in the city.
Now name an actress, first and last name, 3 syllables each. Remove the final vowel sound from her first name, leaving just 2 syllables. 
The 5-syllable result will rhyme with the three words that identify the significance of the year 1512.
What are the world capital, the actress’s name and the 3 words that identify the significance of the year 1512?

TWO:
All four images pictured in this image are tourist attractions associated with one world capital city, but only two are actually situated in that city. Write a caption for the image, in 2-words of 1 and 3 syllables beginning with T and G.
Find two words that rhyme with those words to describe what most professional athletes earn, beginning with G and S.
Find two words that rhyme with those words to describe what “about 23” might represent on a nutrition label, beginning with D and C.
What is the image caption? 
What is what most pro athletes earn?
What might  “about 23” represent on a nutrition label?

THREE:
Name a tourist attraction in a world capital city, in two words of 2 syllables each.
Think of two words that rhyme with those words to name a caption for the image shown at the right.
What are this tourist attraction and this city?


FOUR:
Name a well-known tourist attraction, in two words of 2 and 1 syllables, in a world capital city. Find two words that rhyme with those words to describe what some people who went to the polls last November may now be experiencing.
What is this tourist attraction, and what might the poll-goers be experiencing?

FIVE:
Name a well-known tourist attraction in country whose capital city sounds as if it is experiencing exponential growth. The attraction contains two words of 2 and 1 syllables. Write a caption for the image pictured at the right using two words that rhyme with those words.
What are the tourist attraction and the caption?


Ripping Off Shortz And Herbst Slices:
“Jersey’s Christie! It’s Saintly Lewis!”
(with thanks to ron and Chuck for providing “Saintly Lewis”)

Will Shortz’s June 4th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by David Herbst, reads:
Name a well-known U.S. city with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the last name of a famous 20th-century writer. The first word is something found in virtually every work by this author. What is the city and who is the author?
Puzzleria’s Riffing/Ripping Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Name a well-known U.S. state with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the first name of a somewhat famous 20th-century writer. The first word is contained in a biblical verse (a verse that also contains the word “sun”) that some literary critics might say pertains to some of the works by this writer that appear to be plagiaristic.
What are the state and proverb, and who is the author?


TWO:
Name a somewhat well-known U.S. city with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the last name of a somewhat famous 20th-century writer.
The sixth, fifth and first letters of the first word spell out what one title character in a novel by the writer offered to do to the other title character’s shadow.
The fourth, second, third and sixth letters of the first word (if you insert a “t” between the third and sixth letters) spell out articles of apparel that a character in a play by the writer prefers wearing – as opposed, say, to knickerbockers. (The character is of the same nationality as the writer.)
What is the city and who is the author?
What did one title character offer to do to the other title character’s shadow? 
What articles of apparel did the character in the play prefer to knickerbockers?

THREE:
Name a well-known U.S. city with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the last name of a reasonably famous 20th-century writer. The first word is something found in virtually every work by this author.
What is the city and who is the author?
Note: The answer to this puzzle involves a bit of non-English language trickery. “The first word … found in virtually every work by this author” is an English word that (when translated into French) is a part of a 3-word French term for a certain genre of novel.

FOUR:
Name a somewhat well-known U.S. city with two words in its name. The second word sounds like the last name of a reasonably famous 20th-century British writer. The first word sounds like the last name of a somewhat famous 20th-century French composer and pianist.
The writer lived the final 24 years of his life just 7 miles up the road from the birthplace of the composer.
What is this city? Who are the writer and composer?
Extra Credit Bonus Points!!
According to a Puzzleria! fake news feed, the U.S. city in this puzzle has a “sister city” somewhere in the Eastern Hemisphere, also in two words.
The first word is formed by doubling the middle letter of the last name of a famous world leader and adding a “g” at the end;
The second word is a homophone of Phoebe and Holden’s late brother. 
What is this “alternatively factual” city?
Who is the famous world leader whose surname is tweaked to form the first word of this apocryphal sister city? Who is the brother of Phoebe and Holden? 


Dessert Menu


What Beatles songs title do the two faces of these clocks remind you of?

Hint #1: 
One of the clock faces involves a Beatles song title.
The other clock face involves a word in the lyrics of a Beatles’ song. The word in the lyrics does, however, rhyme with the title of the song.
Hint # 2: Songs on  albums recorded by the Fab Four are generally classified into one of three “Beatle Eras  Early, Middle and Late. The best of the three eras, ILUO (In Legos Unhumble Opinion) is the Middle Era – “Rubber Soul,” “Revolver” and “Yesterday and Today” etc.
Both answers to this puzzle are titles from the same era.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.