Friday, March 15, 2019

Page turners and stage burners; “Hush Hush, Sweet arlotte” Huntin’ down a ’hopper; Treetops under the tundra; Fixin’ luncheons for lunatics

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Huntin’ down a ’hopper

Bait-and-switch supermarkets are always angling to hook us by hiking up prices. 
What’s worse, the bar code scanners used by price checkers sound like that chirping cricket I’d like to squash as he darts about my swimming pool deck. 
Perhaps I could capture the critter, boxing him inside a Polo Club cigarette carton then tossing it off a bridge. 
Or, because I am a proficient stoker and poker, I could instead just toss the carton into my fireplace with wisps of smoke curling above chirp-choking flames.

Identify twelve words in the paragraph above that share something in common. 


Appetizer Menu

S  enic  Ex  ibition  Appetizer:
“Hush Hush, Sweet arlotte”

(Note: The following excellent puzzle is the generous contribution of Mark Scott of Seattle, screen name “skydiveboy.”)
The adjacent letters CH are pronounced in several different ways in words, such as: chair, chrome, gauche. 
Can you find a common English word where the CH is silent?


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Bookworld And Billboard Slice:
Page turners and stage burners

Lop five letters from the end of the first name and add a letter to the end of the last name of a best-selling author. 
Switch the positions of these two altered names to form the name of a best-selling rock band. 
Who are these two best-sellers?



Riffing Off Shortz And Stoll Slices:
Treetops under the tundra

Will Shortz’s March 10th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Hugh Stoll of Harrisonburg, Virginia, reads:
Think of a 4-letter word for something commonly seen in the winter. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a device you use with this thing. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Stoll Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Think of a 5-letter word for an implement one might have seen in a bag along with a brassie, baffie, cleek, jigger, mashie and niblick. Write it in lowercase letters. Replace the fifth letter with a letter next to it in the alphabet. Turn the result upside-down, and you’ll name a general term for these 5-letter implements, as well as for brassies, baffies and certain cleeks. What is this implement?
ENTREE #2:
Think of a 5-letter word describing the common color of two objects often pocketed. (The word is not the color itself but rather a word that modifies the color.) Write it in lowercase letters and turn it upside-down. Place a space between the fourth and fifth letters of the result and replace the fifth letter with one of its homophones. You’ll name a device, in two words, that you can use to help put the objects in pockets. What is it?
Hint: The “sum” of the two objects is 14.
ENTREE #3:
Think of a 5-letter verb for what an aerial predatory attack in the wilderness often does to the victim. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll form a verb for what raptors often do before seizing their prey. What is it raptors do?
Hint: As a noun, the verb is sometimes preceded by the word “fell.”
ENTREE #4:
Think of something in five letters that can be found at the center of a diamond. 
(Hint: The beginning of this word can also be found at the center of a diamond.) 
Write the 5-letter word in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down and you’ll form two new words: something that may elicit a groan and an expression of such a groan. What are the 5-letter word and the two new words?
ENTREE #5:
Think of a word for a martial art. 
Write it in lowercase letters. 
Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a verb for what one might say a dominating practitioner of this martial art does to his opponents. 
What is it? 
ENTREE #6:
Think of a 5-letter slang term for edibles usually served hot, but that originated from Peru and Bolivia. Write it in lowercase letters. 
Turn it upside-down (but leave its middle letter upside-up!), and you’ll name the first name of a canine mascot that once shilled for a potable on television. 
What are this term and name?
ENTREE #7: 
Think of a 3-letter term for a bunch of whales. Write it in lowercase letters. Turn it upside-down, and you’ll name a container for edible spheres. What are this term and container?
ENTREE #8: 
Think of a 5-letter hyphenated word for how Annie Glenn might have replied to the question, “How much did you miss your husband John, and how much did you kiss him when you greeted him after he orbited the Earth three times?” 
Write Annie’s reply in lowercase letters, and in a Century Gothic, Avant Garde or Futura font. Turn the result upside-down and ditch the hyphen, and you’ll have the last name of a fine puzzle maker. 
What did Annie reply, and who is the puzzle maker?


Dessert Menu

Moonpie Dessert:
Fixin’ luncheons for lunatics

M-O-O-N
Name what I’m doin’ above, in two words. Switch the initial consonant sounds. The result sounds like a kitchen utensil. What is this utensil?
Hint: The utensil is likely used more in summertime than in wintertime.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, March 8, 2019

Hall of fame name game; How are a Fife and a Feldman different? Taking time-off from the mystery; Drinks and links in the food chain; Six coefficients of fiction to solve

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Taking time-off from the mystery

Rearrange the letters in the name of a country to form a three-word phrase for a condition that might cause a puzzle fanatic to take a few days off from solving word puzzles, or to perhaps even take an extended furlough from such recreational befuddlement. 
What is this country?
What is the three-word phrase?
Hint: The three words of the phrase appear in alphabetical order.
Note: The second word in the three-word phrase is a compound word sometimes written as two words.



Appetizer Menu


Try Beating These Conundrums Appetizer:
Six coefficients of fiction to solve

🥁1. Think of a fictional character from a fantasy book series in seven letters. Drop one letter and advance the first letter three places in the alphabet to name a fictional creature popular in the fantasy genre.
🥁2. Think of a fictional character in a series of novels and movies, first and last names, who is concerned with discovering his identity. 
Drop four letters and rearrange to name a type of plastic surgery.
🥁3. Think of a novel and movie title in three words where the last word is a measurement device. 
Replace this word with another type of measurement device and drop the last letter to name an ethics principle.
🥁4. Think of a fictional character from an old black and white television show, first and last names, four and seven letters. 
Drop the first letter of the last name, and each name can be rearranged to get two common actions in card games.
🥁5. Think of a radio personality, first and last names. Remove two letters and append a D to name an early 20th century novel.
🥁6. Think of the last name of a fictional pilot from a popular science fiction franchise. Change the vowels to different vowels to name another fictional pilot from a different science fiction franchise.



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Halftime Slice:
Hall of fame name game

What hall-of-fame athlete’s first and last names spell a word that describes the first half of  the sport he or she played?



Riffing Off Shortz And Dunwoody Slices:
Drinks and links in the food chain

Will Shortz’s March 3rd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Alan Hochbaum, of Dunwoody, Georgia, reads:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell some things to eat and some things to drink. Both are plural words. What things are these, and what’s the chain?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Dunwoody Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. 
Its letters can be rearranged to spell the creature pictured in the image here and what it is using for a “cot”. 
What are the creature and its “cot”?
ENTREE #2:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell two synonyms of “stories” – one in a literary sense, the other in a journalistic sense. What synonyms are these, and what’s the chain?
ENTREE #3:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. 
Its letters can be rearranged to spell a large cart with four wheels and four letters, and a six-letter word describing the creatures that haul it. 
What are this cart and the word describing its haulers?
ENTREE #4:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell certain vehicles, in four letters, and the name of a past model of one of these vehicles, in nine letters. What vehicles are these, and what’s the name of the model?
ENTREE #5:
Take the unabridged name of a popular restaurant chain in three words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell something a Boy Scout might wear, in three words of 4, 11 and 5 letters, pictured in the image here. 
What might the Boy Scout wear?
Hint: The first two words of what the Boy Scout might wear begin with the same sound but with different letters. The first word modifies the second word. The third word is a clasp (see the inset in the image) that slides over the apparel to keep it in place. 
ENTREE #6:
Name a popular restaurant chain in two words. Its letters can be rearranged to spell a very large four-letter object that appears to be very small to the naked eye, and a nine-letter word that describes it. 
What object is this, and what word describes it?


Dessert Menu


Kosher Mayberry Dessert:
How are a Fife and a Feldman different?

What’s the difference between Deputy  Barney Fife and deli clerk Barry Feldman?



Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.


Friday, March 1, 2019

A baffler you’ll be buoyed by; Heat from the polar regions; Natural landmarks, National Rand parks; Condiments, candy, spices, snacks! Play for Laffs;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
A baffler you’ll be buoyed by

Name a two-word resource  “harvested” from a creature whose habitat is salty water. 
The second word and a word that sounds like the first word are synonymous verbs also associated with salty water. 
What are these synonyms?
What is the resource? 




Appetizer Menu

Conundrums You Just Can’t Beat Appetizer:
Condiments, candy, spices, snacks!

🥁1. Think of a children’s game in three words, where the first two words are the brand name of a candy.
🥁2. Name a garment in two words. Reverse the words and add an S at the end, and the result will sound like a common snack food.
🥁3. Think of a type of condiment, and a word that means a dense amount of something, in five and six letters. Changing one letter in the condiment, these can be rearranged to spell, respectively, the first and last names of a well-known actress.
🥁4. Think of a type of candy in seven letters. Add a stroke to the first letter and insert another letter somewhere inside to name a cartoon villain.
🥁5. Think of a food in seven letters that features a repeating three-letter pattern. Change one letter to an E and rearrange to name another food.
🥁6. This spice is both a fictional doctor and a fictional sergeant.



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Global Warming Slice:
Heat from the polar regions

Take a two-word term for an environment that promotes polarization and more heat than light. Change the last letter of the first word to an “a”. 
Six consecutive letters of the result spell a dance often described as hot. 
The other letters, in order, spell something that is always hot. 
What is this term?


Riffing Off Shortz And Barkan Slices:
Natural landmarks, National Rand parks

Will Shortz’s February 24th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Roger Barkan of Savage, Maryland, reads:
I’m thinking of a well-known U.S. natural landmark. Take the two-word name of its location. 
Then change the first letter of the second word to the immediately previous letter of the alphabet, and you’ll get another description of the landmark’s location. 
What’s the landmark, and what are the two descriptions of its location?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Barkan Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
I’m thinking of a major U.S. city in “fly-over country.” Replace the fourth letter and spell the result backward to name the second word in a well-known U.S. landmark. What’s the landmark, and what’s the U.S. city?
Hint: The city and the land mark differ in longitude by only about two-and-a-half degrees.

ENTREE #2:
I’m thinking of a well-known U.S. national landmark. The man who oversaw the completion of this landmark was named after a man who is a part of the landmark. 
What is this landmark?
Who is the namesake, and of whom is this person a namesake? 

ENTREE #3:
I’m thinking of a well-known U.S. national landmark. It is the same one that is the intended answer to ENTREE #2, above. Take the two-word name of its location. Replace the first letter of each word. The result are two things that can be cut: one of them in an informal idiom, and the other on a kosher cutting board.    
What’s the landmark, and what are the two things that can be cut?
Hint: Find the sum of the alphanumeric values of the letter and its replacement in the first name of the location; then find the sum of the alphanumeric values of the letter and its replacement in the second name of the location. The two digits in one sum are the same digits in the other sum, only reversed.



Dessert Menu

Looney Tooney Dessert:
Play for Laffs

Give a 3-word description of the Laff network and Cartoon Network.
(Note: the first word is an informal plural noun beginning with an A.) 
Switching the first and third words and saying the result aloud sounds like the title of a famous play. 
What play is this?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, February 22, 2019

“What’s an 11-letter word for...?” Ten-grand/twenty-one twining; Oscar buzz & a Prezzy dozen; Stoking the star-maker fACTORy machinery; What’s the ninth WhiskeyOscarRomeoDelta?

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
What’s the ninth WhiskeyOscarRomeoDelta?

India, Hotel, Mike, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Victor, Yankee
The list above contains words representing eight of 26 letters in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet. (They would be helpful, however, only if you might ever be trying to convey the phrase “My Irish TV” 
orally: “MikeYankee IndiaRomeoIndiaSierraHotel TangoVictor.”)

But, here is your mission: You must find a ninth word in the NATO Phonetic Alphabet that relates to all eight words in this list. 
Explain how this ninth word you found relates to the other eight words.
Fun fact: The NATO Phonetic Alphabet consists of:
Alpha, Bravo, Charlie, Delta, Echo, Foxtrot, Golf, Hotel, India, Juliett, Kilo, Lima, Mike, November, Oscar, Papa, Quebec, Romeo, Sierra, Tango, Uniform, Victor, Whiskey, Xray, Yankee, Zulu.


Appetizer Menu 

A Number Of Conundrums Appetizer:
Stoking the star-maker fACTORy machinery


🥁1. Think of a ‘90s movie title in six words whose initials make a two-word phrase that a Spanish speaker might say to a woman. 
Hint: the movie stars a former Saturday Night Live cast member and was not critically successful.
🥁2. Name an athlete whose last name is a color. Name an actor whose first name sounds the same as the first name of the athlete but whose last name sounds like an office supply.
🥁3. Name the two characters a particular movie actor is best known for, each in five letters. Place them one after the other. Remove four letters from inside and replace with “SH” to name a children’s game.
🥁4. Think of a punk rock band name in seven letters. The first four letters in reverse are a male first name shared by a famous foreign actor. The actor’s last name, minus one letter, can be rearranged into a foreign language.
Answer:
🥁5. Think of a contemporary actor’s last name. Insert “dbo” somewhere inside to create a slang term for a frequent aspect of this actor’s physical appearance on film.
🥁6. Drop two vowels from the nonsense phrase “THANOS EMOJIS” and rearrange to name a television actor.


MENU

Quizzical Slice:
Ten-grand/twenty-one twining

Twenty-One” and “The $10,000 Pyramid” are classic quiz/game shows. 
What else do the numbers “twenty-one” and “ten thousand” have in common?
Hint: The answer involves a palindromic three-digit semiprime number.
  

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Oscar buzz & a Prezzy dozen

Will Shortz’s February 17th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
The numbers 1, 12, 80, and million have something in common that only one other number has. 
What is it ... and what’s the other number?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
The dozen blanks in the sentences below can be filled in with words that are clues to the identities of twelve presidents. Solve for each blank and then identify each “egg” in this “presidential dozen.”
1. Though not himself much of a ______, he did invite Martha Graham to perform at the White House.
2. The ____ he will most likely be remembered for, alas, is “pardon.”
3. He had egg ___ all over his face for countenancing and perpetuating the antebellum yoke of slavery.
4. He was a kind, courteous and generous (some might say “lukewarm-to-a-fault”) man who viewed slavery as a question of property rather than morality; though not a ______ proponent of slavery, he often criticized those who sought to limit or end it. 
5. His legacy as a president is mixed, but he is generally considered by historians as a _____ as a general.
6. He sported a ___ of facial hair above his upper lip.
7. Although presidential historians have generally dismissed this chief executive, he admittedly had a knack for _______ talent into his Cabinet, including  Andrew Mellon, Herbert Hoover and Charles Evans Hughes.
8. His first presidential opponent, besides being four years his junior, was also more photogenic – which seems fitting since the younger candidate and the _____ camera were “born” in the same year!
9. He was not much of a fan of cheeses like _____, but he was fond of fruits, like quinces.
10. He relinquished his ______ as a naval officer (and as a gentleman farmer) to run for president.
11. He was popular in the wake of 9/11, but his star faded a few years later when he chose to ____ us into the the Iraq War, citing phantom weapons of mass destruction. (two answers are possible)
12. It seems his sole presidential asset is a proclivity to _____ his chest.

ENTREE #2:
“Lions and tigers, and no bears, oh why? Oh my!” 
Consider the following list of creatures:
“Lambs,” “Wolves,” “Deer,” “Elephant,” “Bull,” “Lion,” “Tiger,” “Horse,” “Dog” and “Cuckoo”
That “class menagerie” of critters can be found in the titles of movies nominated for an Academy Award Best Picture Oscar: 
“Silence of the Lambs”; “Dances with Wolves”; “The Deer Hunter”; “Elephant Man”; “Raging Bull”; “Lion”; “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”; “War Horse”; “Dog Day Afternoon”; “One Flew Over The Cuckoo’s Nest.”
What movie with “Bear” or “Bears” in its title could conceivably have been nominated for a Best Picture Oscar, thereby providing our “class menagerie” with an ursine presence?


ENTREE #3:
What two slangy body parts beginning with F and T are missing from the following list?
Jaws, Bone, Heart, Arms, Foot, ______, ______.
Hint: Again, Oscar is involved in the solving.


ENTREE #4:
Name four words for one body part. Each appears in a title of a movie that was nominated for a Best Picture Oscar but did not win. 
One word is not English. Two are slangy. What are these four words? 


Dessert Menu

Crosswordwise Palindromania Dessert:
“What’s an 11-letter word for...?”

The palindromic string of letters, OWHWO, represents the initial letters of a crossword-style clue. 
The answer to the clue contains 11 letters and begins with the first 2 letters of the third word of the clue. The clue would look a bit like this:
25.  O_ _ _ _   w_ _  h_ _  w_ _  O_ _ _ _ _.

The words beginning with W contain 3 letters each. The last word, a proper noun, is the plural of the first. 
What are this clue and answer?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.