Friday, April 3, 2020

Political, professional & performing animals; “The unbearable lightness of Beijing” Keeping the hotel-owner happy; Pair of producers past and present; Women’s Wear Dai... Doubly Described

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Producers past and present


A producer produced something in the distant past.
A producer today is producing something else with the same name as what the person in the past produced. 
Both producers’ names begin with the same two letters in the same order.
Their third letters are adjacent in the alphabet, as are their fourth letters. 
Who are these two producers?
What did and do they produce?

Appetizer Menu

Just Try Beating These Conundrums Appetizer:
Political, performing & professional animals

🥁1. Think of an animal associated with a political stance. Reverse its letters and the result when spoken aloud will sound like a French 101 word that has no letters in common. Next, think of an animal associated with an opposing political stance. Drop the last letter and reverse what remains to get an acronym for a type of media service.
🥁2. Name a professional medical title in three letters, all consonants. Distribute three of the same vowel amongst these letters to name an animal.
🥁3. Name something you might see at a carnival, in two words, four and four letters. The two words share three letters which can form either the name of a carnival performance or a performing animal, and the two unique letters can form where a performer might have to go if they work without a net.
🥁4. Think of a word for “eats quickly” in five letters. Shift each letter six places later in the alphabet to name a hairstyle.


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Don’t Worry Be Happy Slice:
Keeping the hotel-owner happy 

Name something homeowners are not happy to see. It’s a two-syllable compound word. Split the word and then spoonerize its two parts. 
The result is what hotel-owner President Donald Trump might be happy to see as the role of Congressman Devin Nunes.
What are homeowners not happy to see?
What might Donald Trump be happy to see as Devin Nunes’s role?



Riffing Off Shortz And Nardo Slices:
“The unbearable lightness of Beijing”

Will Shortz’s March 29th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Raymond Nardo of Mineola, New York, reads:
Here’s an April Foolish puzzle. Think of a world capital. Drop the third and fourth letters, and keeping the remaining letters in order you’ll name a state. What state is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Nardo Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Remove the first letter from a region in France to form the surname of a conductor and violinist associated with Philadelphia. 
Rearrange the letters in this surname to form the first name of a puzzle-maker. The letters in a pair of conjunctions that are often separated by a forward/slash can be rearranged  to form the puzzle-maker’s surname.
Who is this puzzle-maker?
What are the region in France and the surname of conductor and violinist associated with Philadelphia?
What are the two conjunctions?
Hint: The puzzle-maker’s screen name followed by his surname forms the first name of a “Renaissance Man” who actually lived up to the title.
ENTREE #2
Think of a world capital. Delete the third and fourth letters, keep the remaining letters in order and add two spaces. 
As a result you’ll have three words that follow the word “blind...” in a common idiomatic phrase. 
What is the world capital?
What is the idiomatic phrase?
ENTREE #3
Think of a noun that might be used as a category heading for lever, pulley, screw or wedge, for four examples. 
Drop the third and fourth letters and, keeping the remaining letters in order, you’ll name a state. 
What state is it?
ENTREE #4
Think of a word John Donne used in a poem about islands and tolling bells. 
Drop three consecutive interior letters and, keeping the remaining letters in order, you’ll name a state. 
What state is it?
ENTREE #5 
Name a word for blasphemy or desecration, for example, or for any transgression against religion. 
Drop four letters, and keeping the remaining letters in order you’ll name a state. 
The four letters you drop can be arranged to form the first name of people surnamed Hubbell and Sagan. 
What state is it?
What is the word for blasphemy or desecration?
ENTREE #6
Think of a synonym of “bewilder.” 
Drop three consecutive letters that can be rearranged to form a word for someone celebrated in May, and keeping the remaining letters in order you’ll name a state. 
What state is it?
ENTREE #7
Think of a sonnet by John Milton whose eight-word title is also the first line of the sonnet. But the sonnet is also popularly known by a three-word title that does not appear in the sonnet at all (although the second word does make an appearance). 
The third of those three title words is a nine-letter noun to which Milton alludes (but does not mention) in the sonnet. 
Drop four consecutive letters from the interior of this third word and, keeping the remaining letters in order, you’ll name a state. 
What state is it?


Dessert Menu

Fashion Plate Dessert:
Women’s Wear Dai... Doubly Described 


Name something usually worn by women, in six letters. 
Two shorter words, that are spelled the same except for their final letter, often function as adjectives that describe this thing. 
What are these three words?
Note: One of the adjectives is a “less common spelling” of a one-letter-shorter adjective, according to Merriam-Webster.
Hint: An anagram of what is usually worn by women is an antonym of a word for pages of a book with numbers that are evenly divisible by two.

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, March 27, 2020

“Mississippi Pippi, perhaps?” Adventhures in great litherature; All the business world’s a stage; Bard becomes a board-trodder; Mappy mouse and pony show

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Mappy mouse and pony show

The word “boycott” is eponymous – that is, it is named after a real person, Charles Boycott
Spell another such eponymous word backward. Place to the right of this word, without a space, the first name of the word’s namesake, spelled forward. 
The result is a word on the map of the United States. 
What is this word on the map?
What is the eponymous word? After whom is it named?  
Hint: Whereas “boycott” functions as either a noun or verb, the eponymous word you seek functions only as a verb. Its noun form is formed  by appending an “-ing” to the end.


Appetizer Menu

Note: Puzzleria! is proud to present another skillfully crafted “skydiversion” puzzle this week. It is the creation, of course, of Mark Scott of Seattle, known better to many in the cyberworld by his screen name, skydiveboy.
Enjoy Mark’s mastery! 

Theraprynunciation Appetizer:
Adventhures in great litherature

Name a world-famous novelist whose surname, when properly pronounced, begins with the  th sound, as in therapy, but does not begin with either a T or an H. 
Who is it?


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Entertwainment Slice:
All the business world’s a stage

The stage name of an entertainer is also a word for an employee of a business, an employee who deals with customers. 
Remove the last letter of the stage name of the entertainer’s partner. 
The result is something a customer might ask the business employee for. Replace one letter in this thing to name something the employee might ask the customer for. 
What stage duo is this? 

Riffing Off Shortz And Newman Slices:
“Mississippi Pippi, perhaps?”

Will Shortz’s March 22nd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Will’s colleague Stan Newman, who’s the crossword editor for Newsday, reads:
Many famous people’s names contain three pairs of double letters, like Johnny Appleseed and the actress Jennifer Connelly. But there are two famous fiction writers – one male, one female  – whose names have four pairs of double letters. The male writer is Tennessee Williams. Who is the popular female writer?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Newman Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Many crossword puzzle editors’ full names contain letters that appear more than one time. “Will Shortz,” for example, contains two “l’s”. If you remove them the result is “Wish Ortz,” which sounds like someone who covets a Gaming Controller for Nintendo. 
Remove all letters that appear more than once from another puzzle editor’s full name. The first four remaining letters spell word for a brothel or meaty broth. The first three remaining letters plus the fifth letter spell an antonym of “stern.”
Who is this crossword puzzle editor?
ENTREE #2
In October 1941, a female playwright and a male novelist co-hosted at the Hotel Biltmore in New York a dinner and forum to raise money for anti-Nazi activists imprisoned in France. The New York governor had agreed to participate but later balked, citing the “Communist activities” of some of the forum’s sponsors. 
The surnames of the playwright and novelist begin with the same two-letter pronoun. The first 43% of the playwright’s first name consists an “i” and of three of the same consonant. In her surname, replace two consecutive instances of that consonant with a hyphen. The result is the hyphenated word in the headline 
“America’s No 1 __-___,” which referred to the novelist and appeared (along with a photo of Marilyn Monroe) on the cover of a mid 1950s men’s pulp magazine.
Who are this female playwright and a male novelist?  
ENTREE #3
Name a past popular female essayist who is also novelist, from New York City, first and last names.
Insert the fourth letter of her first name into the fourth position in her last name, then delete the last letter of her last name, to spell any instrumental musical composition that includes movements.
Again, take her last name. Remove two consecutive letters (and the space that results) to spell any short musical composition with words and music.
Rearrange the letters of her surname at birth to spell to two onomatopoeic words you would hear in a pasture filled with bulls and sheep.
Who is this essayist/novelist?
ENTREE #4
Name a past British playwright and novelist with two spaces in her name (like Joyce Carol Oates, for instance). Remove the spaces and the first four and last five letters of the name. 
Divide what remains in half, forming the first name of an actor surnamed Beatty and and the first name of an actress with the surname that is the first name of a Yankee catcher who died in the middle of a promising career. 
Who is this British playwright and novelist?
Who are the actor and actress?
ENTREE #5
An amateur poet with three words in his name (like Edgar Allan Poe, for instance) once composed lyrics to a song that many people now know by heart. 
The title he gave to his composition includes two consecutive “f’s”. The amateur poet’s name includes two consecutive “esses”.
Who is this amateur poet?
What title did he give to his composition?
ENTREE #6
Name a country-pop singer whose name contains four consecutive consonants that are the same consonant.
Remove the four consonants and an “i” to spell a masculine first name that is an anagram of a synonym of  the word “trunk.”
Who is this singer?


Dessert Menu

Penning An Ultimate Dessert:
Bard becomes a board-trodder 

Take the first and last names of a poet. Remove the first letter of the last name and replace its antepenultimate and penultimate letters with its second and third letters. 
The result is the birth name of an actor. 
Who are this poet and actor? 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, March 20, 2020

A tale of two titles at the drive-in; “Enter the trained entertainers!” “When did Dylan go eclectic?” From self-sacrifice to unfettered freedom; No real change in something strange;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
A tale of two titles at the drive-in

Name two movie titles, both directed by one well-known movie-maker. Take the first word of each.
Place the first four letters of one word to the left of the other word. 
The result, after inserting a space in the right place, is a two-word term for certain professionals who work outdoors. 
Who are these professionals?
Hint: Take the unused letters of the word from which you took four letters. They form, in order, a prefix indicating a danger these professionals often encounter.
Hint: Both movies are suspenseful and were produced more than sixty years ago.


Appetizer Menu


Note: The delicious appetizer below, “No real change in something strange,” was cooked up in the cranial kitchen of a very valued contributor to Puzzleria! 
Who is it? 
Well, the puzzle’s author left it up to me whether to reveal the identity or to keep it a secret...
I shall do neither! Solomon-like, I shall “split the difference” by posing the following “mini-puzzle”:
The letters in the screen name of our mystery puzzle contributor appear in the word “Puzzleria!”
But now, on to a puzzle created by this mystery Puzzlerian!, one who actually does have the wisdom of Solomon:

Synonym And Demonym Appetizer:
No real change in something strange

Think of a multi-syllabic word for something strange. 
Remove four letters that may or may not be consecutive. 
The remaining letters, in the same order, spell a synonym of the original word. 
The four letters you removed, in order, spell an informal demonym.  
What are this word, synonym and demonym?



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Liberty Belles Slice:
From self-sacrifice to unfettered freedom

Name a two-syllable intransitive verb meaning to limit one’s own liberty. 
Switch the initial sounds of the syllables to get what sounds like a two-word term for unlimited liberty. 
What is this term?
What is the two-syllable verb? 

Riffing Off Shortz And Cohen Slices:
“Enter the trained entertainers!”

Will Shortz’s March 15th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Adam Cohen of Brooklyn, New York, reads:
Think of a well-known entertainer, six letters in the first name, four letters in the last. You can change the first letter of the entertainer’s last name to name an animal. And you can change the first letter of the entertainer’s first name to get what kind of animal that is.
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Cohen Slices read:
ENTREE #1
Think of a puzzle-maker, four letters in the first name, five letters in the last. 
You can change one letter of the puzzle-maker’s first name to name a kind of cheese. And you can change one letter of the entertainer’s second name to get a word for a group of epicures who gather for monthly cheese tastings.
Who are this actor, cheese and word for a group of epicures?
ENTREE #2
Think of a reasonably well-known actor from the past, four letters in the first name, four letters in the last. 
You can change the first letter of the actor’s last name to name an animal that is neither fish nor fowl. And you can change the first letter of the entertainer’s first name to get either a part of a fish or a part of a fowl – two rhyming words.
Who is this actor?
Name the animal, the part of a fish and the part of a fowl.
ENTREE #3
Think of a not-well-known-at-all-but-ought-to-be-well-known playwright, with seven letters in the first name and with a middle name that is the name of a city. 
The playwright wrote a play with a different city name in its title. 
The nickname of any professional player on a sports team in one of these two cities is a four-letter animal. 
The first name of the playwright, if you change its first letter, spells the kind of animal it is. 
Who is this playwright and what is the play title?
What is the animal, and what kind of animal is it?
ENTREE #4
Name an asinine critter, in six letters. You can change the first letter of that critter to name a second critter. 
Name a six-letter adjective for what kind of critter that second critter is. You can change the third letter of that adjective to form an adjective for the brightest star in the heavens. 
An adjective for a third critter, a critter associated with that bright star, can be formed by removing two consecutive letters from the word “asinine” and placing a new letter at the beginning of the result.
What are these three critters?
What are the adjectives for the second and third critters? 
ENTREE #5
Think of a reasonably-well-known actress/director from the past, three letters in the first name, six letters in the last, who is associated with the film-noir style of cinematography. You can change the last letter of the actress/director’s last name to name an adjective for an animal. 
This animal is the last word in the name of a movie, adapted from a Jack London novel, in which the actress starred. 
Who is this actress/director?
What are the animal and its adjective?
What is the title of the cinematic Jack London adaptation in which the actress starred?
ENTREE #6
The adjective “presidential” modifies a four-letter word for a certain symbol that  appears on the tail side (or reverse side) of a certain coin. A homonym of this four-letter word is modified by the word “phocine.” (“Homonym,” in this instance, means a word that means something different but that is spelled and pronounced the same.)
The head of a president appears on the obverse side of this coin. Take the first name of this president’s spouse. Change its sixth letter to an “i” and delete its first and third letters, to form a word that modifies the critter (with a tail) that appears on the “tail side” of this coin.
What word is modified by the adjective “presidential”?
What is the first name of the spouse of the president whose head appears on the obverse side of this coin?
What word modifies the critter with a tail that appears on the reverse side of this coin? What is this critter?
Entree #7
Consider the image pictured here. 
A noun for something in the image is also an adjective describing something else in the image. 
Remove the sixth, seventh and ninth letters from this “both-noun-and-adjective” word to name a third thing in the image.
What is the noun/adjective word and what does it describe as an adjective?
What is the third thing in the image?
Entree #8
Think of an American-born married couple who were Russian spies. The husband’s first name is also the name of a famous domestic cat. 
Remove the fifth letter of the wife’s first name at birth to get what kind of animal a much bigger cat is.
Who are this couple of spies?
Hint: The surname of the couple is also the surname of a puzzle-maker.
  
Dessert Menu

Buying Breakfast Links At The Chain Store Dessert:
“When did Dylan go eclectic?”

Remove the seventh letter of an eclectic guitarist’s full name, then move the last letter of the name into its place. 
The result, in order, spells an international chain store and what a person might make after shopping there. 
Who is this guitarist?
What is the international chain store? 
What might a person make after shopping there?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, March 13, 2020

Our clever cryptic setter is “Berry” inventive; Florida sunshine melts the Midwest; “We doubt that the Island of Noman even exists!” “Only squares celebrate Pi Day!” “Jingle sells, jingle sells...”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/20 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“Jingle sells, jingle sells...”

The initial letters of the first six words in a classic advertising jingle spell what sounds like a nickname for a person who would not use the product that the jingle sells. 
What are these jingle words?
Hints: 
1. One of the six words contains an apostrophe. 
2. The six letters that spell what sounds like a nickname include two consecutive alike letters. If one were eliminated we could remove the words “what sounds like” from the puzzle text.

Appetizer Menu

“Solve Me, I’m Irish” Appetizer:
Our clever cryptic crossword setter is “Berry” brilliant

Top o’ the mornin’, Cryptic Crossword aficionados!
We offer this week a Pi Day/St. Patrick’s Day/St. Joseph’s Day puzzle by Patrick J. Berry (screen name, “cranberry”). 
It is his lucky 13th cryptic crossword we have published on Puzzleria!
Here are the links to Patrick’s dozen previous cryptic crosswords on Puzzleria!
ONE TWO THREE FOUR FIVE SIX SEVEN
EIGHT NINE TEN ELEVEN TWELVE
If you are unfamiliar with cryptic crossword puzzles, here are a few basic cryptic crossword puzzle instructions:
Regarding the Across and Down clues and their format...
The number in parentheses at the end of each clue tells how many letters are in the answer. Multiple numbers in parentheses indicate how letters are distributed in multiple-word answers.
For example, (6) indicates a six-letter answer like “jalopy,” (5,3) indicates a five-and-three-letter answer like “cargo van,” and (5-5) indicates a five-and-five-letter hyphenated answer like “Rolls-Royce.”
(For further insight about how to decipher these numbered cryptic clues, see Patrick’s “Cryptic Crossword Tutorial” in this link to his November 17, 2017 cryptic crossword. 
The Tutorial appears below the grid that contains the answers in that edition of Puzzleria!)
And now, on to the thirteenth cryptic crossword in the sacred canon of our own “Saint Patrick.”
May the luck o’ the Irish be with you as you solve it:

ACROSS
1. Holding Dowager Empress in Rhode Island city?(10)
6. Go flippin’ crazy!(4)
9. Starts to take notice, getting into puzzle: It’s nonsense!(10)
10. Few recognize romantic love(4)
12. Actor portraying two Presidents? Just the opposite!(8,4)
15. Find one really running behind(7)
16. Woman getting makeover used to be on TV(7)
17. No good to remain alone with character played by 12?(3,4)
19. Talk radio program’s suggestion of Deep State infiltrating Washington newspaper?(7)
20. Actor skeptical about tempo in musical(6,6)
23. TV channel(4)
24. Clever cryptic setter is between coasts(10)
25. A little gibberish in this clue?(4)
26. Perhaps our old bags may need to be checked(5,5)



DOWN
1. Meathead?(4)
2. Monster, so raised(4)
3. Character played by 12 turned up first of the year in Indonesia, surprisingly(7,5)
4. Finish “Black Beauty”(not hardback)(7)
5. Where Hollywood is hosting the biggest stars, such as 12’s wife(7)
7. South African-born talk show host, refreshingly rare on TV? Oh!(6,4)
8. Spreads lies about Hope, Crosby, and Lamour?(10)
11. One willing to take date skydiving for the first time here?(6,6)
13. Rev. Spooner’s clear-cut observation?(10)
14. Almost appropriate on popular series(5,5)
18. Routine examination while inside(7)
19. Rank smell? This won’t really help(7)
21. Regal sort of family on top in Shakespeare play(4,4)
22. See 21 Down

MENU

Eponymous Product Slice:
Florida sunshine melts the Midwest 

Name a large Midwestern city and its state, in thirteen total letters. Remove from the final eight letters six of the seven letters of a large Florida city. 
Move the first three letters of this result to the end to form the name of a product. A common type of one such product was named after the Midwestern city and was manufactured there more than a century ago. 
What cities are these?
What is the product?

Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
“Only squares celebrate Pi Day!”

Will Shortz’s March 8th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minnesota, reads:
This week’s challenge is something different. It involves Pi Day, which is this coming Saturday, March 14  – commonly written as 3/14. That’s been designated Pi Day because 3-1-4 are the first three digits of pi. Well, the letters of “Pi Day” also have a curious mathematical significance. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices read:
ENTREE #1
This Riff-Off puzzle involves the informal short-form first name of a famous past baseball player and the informal short-form first name of a not-so-famous current puzzle-maker. The sum of the letters in these first names is 5. 
Well, these five letters also have a curious mathematical significance associated with the number 5. 
What are the two first names?
What curious mathematical significance associated with the number 5 do they have? 
ENTREE #2
This Riff-Off puzzle involves an alliterative two-word 8-letter term that is associated with surfers, loafers, idlers, “wasting away in Margaritaville,” Jimmy Buffett and Jeff Spicoli. 
Replace a letter that appears twice in the two-word term with a letter that appears just once. Put the result in alphabetical order. 
Well, these eight letters also have a curious mathematical significance.
What is the 8-letter two-word term associated with surfers, loafers, Jimmy and Jeff? 
What is the curious mathematical significance these eight letters have (after one of the letters has been changed)?
ENTREE #3
This Riff-Off puzzle involves something most dogs have (in three letters) and a noun (in four letters) indicating the shape of one strand plucked from the pelt of a poodle. 
Well, these seven letters also have a curious mathematical significance associated with the number 3. 
What are these two words associated with canines?
What curious mathematical significance associated with the number 3 do they have?
ENTREE #4
This Riff-Off puzzle involves the first word in a well-known Christmas carol composed by early leaders in the Methodist movement. Shakespeare used the word twice to begin a well-known poem/song in one of his plays. It is a verb in four letters. 
Well, these four letters also have a curious orthographical distinction that is not shared by the other 22 letters of the alphabet  a uniqueness that pertains to their numerical positions in the alphabet. 
What is this four-letter verb?
What is the curious orthographical distinction the four letters of the verb share? 
ENTREE #5
This Riff-Off puzzle involves a three-letter word that is the first part of three compound words that end in “powder,” “smoke” and “fire.” 
Well, these three letters also have a curious mathematical significance associated with the number 7. 
What is this three-letter word.?
What curious mathematical significance associated with the number 7 do they have?
Hint: the letters of the three-letter word, in a different order, are the last three letters in the surname of a puzzle-maker.
ENTREE #6
This Riff-Off puzzle challenges the solver to write a three-word caption (in six, four and six words) for the left half of the image pictured here. But you may need some help. Here it is:
Choose an alphabet. Spell out its letters. For example, the eighth letter of the Greek alphabet is spelled “theta,” the eighth letter of the Latin alphabet is spelled “aitch,” and the eighth letter of the Hebrew alphabet is spelled “chet,” “cheth,” “cheit” or “het.”
Now take a handful (more or less) of letters from the alphabet of your choice. Assign a number to each letter – a number indicating its numerical position in the alphabet. If you have taken the correct “handful” of letters from the alphabet each these numbers will be “perfect.”
Now spell out your handful of letters. (For example, in the Latin alphabet the “w” would become “double-u,” the “j” would become “jay” and the “q” would become “cue.”) Pool the sum of letters from these spellings and rearrange them to form the 16-letter caption for the image. 
What is this caption? 
What alphabet did you choose?
What “perfect” numbers did you choose?

Dessert Menu

Geopolitical Dessert:
“We doubt that the Island of Noman even exists!” 

The last letter of a one-word island is the first letter of a three-syllable noun indicating the island’s autonomous geopolitical status.
The second-last letter of this island is the last letter of this noun.
Rearrange the combined letters of this island and noun to form a three-word term for a certain 20th-century-era skeptic. 
What is this three-word term?
What is the name of the island and what is the three-syllable noun indicating its autonomous geopolitical status?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.