Friday, October 20, 2017

Anatomy leads to antonymy; Translating algebra into English; Climate change of place; Men of (somewhat different) letters


PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (876 + 54) SERVED

Welcome to our October 20th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!
We feature this week a ⇓⇓⇓⇓ four-part Riffing Off Shortz Slice. It asks the solver to shift some numbers around to equalize inequalities, then to translate numerical equations into English poetry.
Also on our menus are:
One anatomical Appetizer,
One  Best Seller Slice, and
One world map Dessert.

Please enjoy.

Appetizer Menu

Body Language Appetizer:
Anatomy leads to antonymy 

Place the names of two body parts, singular and plural, next to each other without a space. Inserting spaces in two different places results in three consecutive new words. The first and third new words are antonyms of one another. The second new word names what one of the body parts allows you to do. What are these body parts?

MENU

Best Seller Slice:
Men of (somewhat different) letters

Remove some consecutive letters from the full name (as it appears on dust jackets) of a best-selling author to form the full name (as it appears on dust jackets) of another best-selling author who has published about four times as many books as the first author, and in a different genre. Who are these authors?

Riffing Off Shortz And Guido Slices:
Translating algebra into English 

Will Shortz’s October 1st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Zack Guido, reads: 

Write down the equation 65 – 43 = 21. You’ll notice that this is not correct. 65 minus 43 equals 22, not 21. The object is to move exactly two of the digits to create a correct equation. There is no trick in the puzzle’s wording. In the answer, the minus and equal signs do not move.
Puzzleria’s! Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
Write down the equation 65 – 43 = 210. You’ll notice that this is not correct. 65 minus 43 equals 22, not 210. The object is to move exactly two of the digits to create a correct equation. 
There is no trick in the puzzle’s wording. In the answer, the minus and equal signs do not move. 
TWO:
Write down the equation 65 = 43 – 210. You’ll notice that this is not correct. The object is to delete exactly one digit and move exactly two of the remaining six digits to create a correct equation. There is no trick in the puzzle’s wording. In the answer, the minus and equal signs do not move.
THREE:
Translate the following equation into an English quatrain. The first and third lines are written in iambic tetrameter. The second and fourth lines are written in iambic trimeter with dangling unstressed syllables at their ends.
(13 + 20)  +  (30 + 43)  =  97
    11

Here is an outline of what the quatrain will look like:
A _____’_  _____  ____  _  _____ 
Divided  __  ______
Plus  ______  ____  ___  ____  __  ____
Will  _____  ______-_____.


FOUR:
Translate the following equation into an English quatrain in iambic heptameter
($100)(12) – [($0.10)(7,000) + ($0.25)(1,200)  + ($0.05)(x)] = 0
The first couplet of the quatrain consists of two declarative sentences, each ending with a period. The second couplet of the quatrain includes a colon and a comma, in that order, and ends with a question mark.
The verse contains 45 words. 
Its first line contains 11 words, one of them a contraction; The second line contains 12 words; The third line contains 11 words; The fourth line contains 9 words.
There are no hyphenated words in the verse.
The final words of the four lines are, in order, “times,” “bill,”  [a word that rhymes with “times”] and [a word that rhymes with “bill”].
The initial words of the four lines are, in order,
“My,” 
“Per,” 
“This” and “Twelve.” 
Below, in alphabetical order, are 25 of the 35 remaininng (43 – 8) words that appear in the quatrain. The number in parentheses following each word indicates the line in which it appears:
a (1), a (2), and (3), blown (3), break (2), cash (1), crisp (2), dollar (2), each (2), how (4), I (2), in (1), income’s (1), is (3), many (4), me (1), meager (1), month (2), on (3), paid (1), slots (3), sum (3), to (1), vendors (3), year (2);
The remaining 10 words (35 – 25) are evident in the algebraic equation that is to be translated.
Here is an outline of what the quatrain will look like:
My ______  ______’_  ____  __  __  __  ____  _  _____  times
Per ____.  ____  _____  _  _____  _  _____  ___  _______  ______  bill.  
This  ___  __  _____  __  _____  ___  _______:  _____  ________  [“times” rhyme],
Twelve  _______  ________  ____  ___  ____  _______  ______  [“bill” rhyme]?

(Finally, solve for x.)


Dessert Menu

Global Dessert:
Climate change of place

Remove a two-letter abbreviation from a city on the world map, leaving two words in which all five vowels appear exactly once except for “a” (which not appear at all)
Reverse the positions of the two words, remove the space, replace the “u” with an “a”  and eliminate the “e”. The result, spelled backward, names the climate of this city.
What is this city, and what is its climate?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, October 13, 2017

Much ado, but not about nothing; “Do you serve sausage links at this chain?” Pick-a-nickname basket; Nation-building, one letter at a time; Director’s cut and pastry

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (876 + 54) SERVED

Welcome to our October 13th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

In this edition of Puzzleria!, we celebrate the opening of the NBA season by shooting a ⇓⇓ pair of hoop-dee-doo Appetizers out to you. 
Also on our menus are:
One restaurant-chain Slice
One 20-part Riffing-Off-Shortz Slice, and
One pair-of-pastries puzzle for Dessert.

No need to drain the swamp. (Tis a Trumpian task.) 
Instead, just step behind the rainbow arc, let your best shots rain down, and drain those threes!
It may just be enjoyable.

Appetizer Menu

Rewriting The Headline Appetizer:
Much ado, but not about nothing

The 2017-18 National Basketball Association season begins this week. 
Almost six years ago a young NBA player came out of nowhere and amazingly led his team to victory in a string of consecutive games. 
The national media, fandom and entire sports world celebrated this scintillating meteoric sensation. Among the headlines were “Thrillin’!” and “Against All Odds!” 
Another headline might have read:
“_ _ _ is really _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _!”
in which the first word is the surname of the sensational player and the final word is a common compound word, but used in an informal sense.
Reverse the order of the letters in the surname and replace the final word with an antonym to form the following factual statement:
“_ _ _ is really _ _ _ _ _ _ _.”

What are this headline and statement? Who is the player?
Hint: Spoonerize the player’s name and you’ll name a legendary town of the Old West and a drink that might be served at a saloon in that town.

National Basketball Appetizer:
Pick-a-nickname basket

Name the full name (city and nickname) of one of the thirty National Basketball Association teams. (For example, the full name of an NFL team might be the Green Bay Packers; of an NHL team, the Pittsburgh Penguins; and of a MLB team, the Boston Red Sox.)
Delete the first four letters of the city. Saying the result aloud sounds like the nicknames of two NBA teams – just the nicknames, not the cities.
What two NBA teams are these?
Hint: These two teams have played more than 100 games in head-to-head competition. Thus far, each has won exactly half of them. 

MENU

Antonymous Slice:
“Do you serve sausage links at this chain?”

Name a restaurant chain based in the United States but with outlets worldwide. Divide it between two of its interior letters. 
The second part sounds like a noun, the adjective form of which is an antonym of the first part of the chain.
What is the restautant chain? What are the antonyms?

Riffing Off Shortz And Stuart Slices:
Nation-building, one letter at a time 

Will Shortz’s October 1st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Chris Stuart, reads: 
Take the name of a country. Insert an E somewhere inside it. You’ll get a phrase that answers the question: What did Henry Ford do?
Puzzleria’s! Riffing Off Shortz and Stuart Slice reads:
In each of the 20 puzzles below, insert the letter indicated (in parentheses) somewhere inside the name of a country it to form what is clued:
(The position of the letter in each clue’s answer is indicated by the number in parentheses at the end of the clue. Some countries may be used more than once.)
Example: 
(O) Infatuation with an A. A. Milne character (2 or 3) 
Answer: Roo mania (Romania) 


1. (T) What Henry Ford’s Model T did? (2)
2. (Y) Bad eggs (5)
3. (S) A submarine-wear acronym (1)
4. (N) Jailer (4)
5. (R) A pair of containers (3)
6. (R)  “Take ahold of this!” (2)
7. (R) Painful wrist twist (3)
8. (L) What Ricky Ricardo wants Lucy to do when she messes up (3)


9. (L) Q: “What’s __ ____?” A: “Sodium cocoate, sodium palmate, sodium tallowate, sodium palm kennelate...” (6)
10. (D) Reno or Las Vegas? (1)
11. (E) Baltimore? (3)
12. (I) Hawaii? (3)
13. (I) Opening to a memo meant for a movie character portrayed by Teri Garr (3)
14. (A) Beheld Paradise (2)
15. (S) “The new egg-shaped speaker! (manufactured by a Milwaukee-based corporation)” (3 or 4)
16. (O) Render “Orinoco Flow” singer unconscious in the squared circle (2)
17. (M) Attached Sistine Madonna by Raphael to a wall in the Louvre (5)
18. (R) Large supermarket chain in Trinidad and Tobago (2)
19. (S) An hombre “who was a singer, dancer, actor, and musician in Mexico,” according to Wikipedia (6)
20. (L) Surname of Happy, Biff and Willy (1)

Dessert Menu

Cinnamontography Dessert:
Director’s cut and pastry

Name a reasonably well-known actress. 

Move the last letter of her first name to the beginning, forming a pastry. 

Form a different pastry by replacing the fourth letter of her last name with the fourth letter of her first name and adding a letter to the end.

Who is this actress? 
What are the two pastries?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Amps & Ampersands; Facial double feature; Space-walking sideways; Peeb, Peeb, Peeb, Peeb...

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (876 + 54) SERVED

Welcome to our October 6th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria!

We are offering another week’s-worth of worthy puzzles again in this new edition of Puzzleria!. 

On our menus are:
One plain-as-the-nose-(or-whatever)-on-your-face Appetizer,  
One amped-up & sanded-down Slice,  
One viadromedary (Roadrunner) Dessert (Peeb, Peeb!),  and
Four Shortz Riff-off Slices in which letters of the alphabet move into new spaces, either crabwise or counter-crabwise. ⇓⇓⇓⇓ 

So, whet your coyote wiles while outwitting our puzzles.
And, enjoy the chase.

Appetizer Menu

Rushmore Appetizer:
Facial double feature

Write, in lowercase letters, something you might see on a person’s face. Remove the third letter. Invert the second letter and place it at the end of the word. 
Delete the spaces formed by these two letters absence. You’ll name something else you might see on a person’s face, especially when the other facial “thing” is present.
What things are these seen on a person’s face, often simultaneously?


MENU

My?terian Slice:
Amps & Ampersands

Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers, Kool & the Gang, Gary Lewis & the Playboys, Hootie & the Blowfish, Question Mark & the Mysterians, Bob Marley & the Wailers, Tommy James & the Shondells, Bill Haley & His Comets, Country Joe & the Fish — all are  band names consisting of two parts divided by an ampersand.

Think of two bands with such two-part names. Consider the final word in each name. One of the final words names small rectilinear-solid objects. The other final word names small indentations that appear on these objects.

What are these two band names?

Riffing Off Shortz And Baggish Slices:
Space-walking sideways  

Will Shortz’s October 1st NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Steve Baggish, reads: 
Think of a 4-letter food. Move each letter one space later in the alphabet — so A would become B, B would become C, etc. Insert a U somewhere inside the result. You'll name a 5-letter food. What foods are these?
Puzzleria’s! Riffing Off Shortz and Baggish Slices read:

ONE: 
Think of a 4-letter food. Move each letter one space earlier in Puzzleria!’s Closed-Loop, Circular, Seamless Alphabet — so A would become Z, B would become A, C would become B etc. Spell the result backward. You’ll name a synonym for “wad of sawbucks.” What food and synonym are these?
Hint: The food and synonym begin with the same letter.

TWO: 
Think of a 5-letter word for the source of a 5-letter food not likely to be found on most vegetarian menus. 
Move each letter one space later in Puzzleria!’s Closed-Loop, Circular, Seamless Alphabet — so Z would become A, A would become B, B would become C, etc. 
Move the new fifth letter to the beginning of the result. You’ll name what a Thanksgiving meal host might do while preparing a food that a vegetarian guest would politely decline. 
What two words are these?
Hint: All three 5-letter words begin with the same letter.

THREE:
Think of a 2-word description of stellar receivers Jerry Rice, Don Hutson or Randy Moss — a 4-letter adjective and a 3-letter noun. 
Move each of the seven letters one space later in Puzzleria!’s Closed-Loop, Circular, Seamless Alphabet — so Z would become A, A would become B, B would become C, etc. 
You’ll form two new words — a synonym of “firkins” and an antonym of “friend.” 
Place the synonym after the antonym without a space, and remove one of the letters to form a variant (British) spelling of a term from biology. 
What are these five words: adjective, noun, synonym, antonym and term from biology?

FOUR:
Think of a 4-letter beverage brand – a sugary, caffeinated energy cola. Place a 3-letter affirmative exclamatory word before the brand to form what might be a pithy and emphatic slogan for the beverage. 
The slogan might well have been used during ESPN’s coverage of the 2011 X Games (annual extreme sports event), in which the cola brand was a proud sponsor along with other “extreme” energy beverages such as Red Bull (and perhaps other brands such as Amp, Monster, Full Throttle and Rockstar).
Take the 3-letter-plus-4-letter hypothetical slogan for the cola brand. Move each letter one space earlier in Puzzleria!’s Closed-Loop, Circular, Seamless Alphabet — so A would become Z, B would become A, C would become B etc. You’ll name a possible 1-letter-plus-6-letter name for extreme energy beverages that are X Games sponsors. 
What is this hypothetical 7-letter slogan?
What is this possible 7-letter name for X Games energy beverage sponsors?

Dessert Menu

Pineapple Rightside-Left Cake Dessert:

Spell the letters of the second half of an 8-letter adjective backward. 
Place the first half of the adjective in back of it to form an 8-letter noun. Both words have negative connotations. 
What are this adjective and noun?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.