Friday, September 25, 2020

“Put up your Duke, Pilgrim!” Proverb becomes a pro player; Sharp as an ax... or as an ox? Some fractions sum to a whole; An ounce-of-prevention's-worth

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 3(7!) SERVED



Schpuzzle Of The Week:

An ounce-of-prevention’s-worth


Name a cure, in multiple words. The first letters of all but the last word spell a new word. 


Place this new word next to the last word to name something that is often cured. 

What is this cure?

What is often cured?


Appetizer Menu


“Conumberdrum” Set Slice:

Some fractions sum to a whole


This puzzle involves the sum of two fractions, an equals sign, and a single digit answer. The fractions contain a single digit above and a single digit below, and are not necessarily in simplified form. In this way there are a total of five digits to fill in.

The game is to fill these five spaces with any of the digits one through nine, not repeating any digits, so that the equation is true.

Following these rules, answer the following questions.


🥁1. What number(s) cannot appear in a denominator?

🥁2. What number(s) cannot appear as an answer?

🥁3. In how many equations are both fractions in simplified form?


🥁4. Find a group of five numbers that generate two distinct equations (the commutativity of addition notwithstanding). What are these equations? How many of these exist? Can you find a group of five numbers that generates three or more equations?

🥁5. Ignoring the commutativity of addition, how many distinct equations exist? Can you find all of them?


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Oxymoronic Slice:

Sharp as an ax... or as an ox?


Take two consecutive letters of an alphabet. Spell one of them out and name a homophone of the other. 



A letter appears twice in these two words. Remove one of them. 


Rearrange the combined letters of the result to form an oxymoronic phrase that consists of an adjective and noun. What is this phrase?


Riffing Off Shortz And VanMechelen Slices:

“Put up your Duke, Pilgrim!”  


Will Shortz’s September 20th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Greg VanMechelen of Berkeley, California, reads:

Take the name of a famous actor — 4 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Spoonerize it. That is, interchange the initial consonant sounds of the first and last names. The result will be two new familiar first names — one male, one female — that start with the same letter ... but that letter is pronounced differently in the two names. Who’s the actor?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and VanMechelenHorn Slices read:

ENTREE #1:

Name a puzzle-maker whose name contains three uppercase letters. Delete the third uppercase letter and the letters following it. 

The first uppercase letter in the name is one of three in a monogram currently in the news.


Replace this uppercase letter with one of the other two monogram letters. Interchange the initial consonant sounds of these two strings of letters that begin with the two capital letters. The result  is an abbreviation for a healthful food and a word for another healthful food.

Who is this puzzle-maker?

What are the healthful foods?


ENTREE #2:

Take the name of a famous American citizen — 4 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Spoonerize it. That is, interchange the initial consonant sounds of the first and last names. The result will sound like two terms with which anglers are familiar — a part of a fish, and what an angler does to a hook before landing a fish. Who’s the American citizen?


ENTREE #3:

(Note: Greg VanMechelen  and I came up with the following riff-off independently of one other.)

Take the name of a past singer/entertainer — one syllable each in the first and last names. 

Spoonerize it. 


The result will be the title of a movie that starred the answer to this week’s NPR puzzle created by Greg VanMechelen (see the Riffing Off Shortz and VanMechelen introduction, above). 

Who’s the singer/entertainer?

What’s the movie title?


ENTREE #4:

Take the name of a member of a famous entertainment trio — 5 letters in the first name, 4 letters in the last. Spoonerize it. 


The result will sound like a two-word transportation service found at Madeline Island, Wisconsin, and all across Europe at various islands, seas and ports.

Who’s the entertainment-trio member?

What’s the transportation service?

 

ENTREE #5:

Take the name of a historical person associated with what its inventors called “fire medicine” — 3 letters in the first name, 6 letters in the last. Spoonerize it. The result will sound like two words — 3-letter interjection of admonishment and a 5-letter verb. 


A bystander might exclaim the interjection upon witnessing an impolite fan who stares rudely or obsessively (the 5-letter verb) at a celebrity, for example.

Who’s the historical person?

What are the interjection and verb?


ENTREE #6:

Take the name of a pretty well known fictional character — 7 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Shift the initial consonant sound of the last name to the beginning of the first name, which starts with a vowel. 

The result sounds like two consecutive exclamations groaned by a weight-watcher standing in front of her mirror with a measuring tape around her waist reading 33 instead of the 32 it read a few days earlier.


The first exclamation is a 3-letter word related to adiposity. The second exclamation consists of three words: a pronoun, verb and noun of 1, 4 and 4 letters. The verb is a synonym of  “swear” and the noun is the difference between 33 and 32 (“one ____”).

Who is the fictional character?

What are the two exclamations?


ENTREE #7:

Take the name of a pretty well known fictional character — 3 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Interchange the initial consonant sounds of the first and last names. 

The result will be two 4-letter words: 

1. the first half of the name of a Tony Award winning musical with a song titled “The Song That Goes Like This” and...


2. the second half of the name of a Tony Award winning play with a song titled “Those Fat Monkeys.”

Who is the fictional character?

What are the two Tony-winning stage productions?


ENTREE #8:

Take the name of a pretty well known fictional character — 5 letters in the first name, 5 letters in the last. Interchange the initial consonant sounds of the first and last names. 

The result will be two words:

1. The title subject of one of William Blake’s “Songs of Experience” and...

2. Any person who may bear that title subject as a name.

Who is the fictional character?

What are the Blake title subject and the person who may have it as a name?


Dessert Menu


Skyhook Dessert:

Proverb becomes a pro player


Rearrange the letters of a familiar six-word proverb to form a five-word phrase consisting of:

§ a city, 

§ a  two-word description of a high-scoring professional athlete who played there, and 

§ the first name of this athlete. 


What are this phrase and this proverb?

Hint #1: The two-word description is also a colloquial term for something seen in the sky.

Hint #2: The athlete, who has the last name of a U.S. president, scored more that 12,000 points during his professional career.


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.


Friday, September 18, 2020

“Apple Synonym Choo-Choos” Perversification; Groupthink, groupspeak, groupsolve; McPuzzling McJobs in the fields of renown; “Music City, USA?”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 3(7!) SERVED

Schpuzzle Of TheWeek:
“Music City, USA?”

Take a United States city that is named after a historical figure. 
Delete a letter and rearrange the result to spell a musical instrument. 
The last three letters of the city’s state, if spelled backward, spell a second musical instrument. 
What city is this?


Appetizer Menu

Puzzle Fun By Bobby Jacobs Debut Appetizer:
“Apple Synonym Choo-Choos”


1. Take two types of transportation and put them together, one after the other. 
Remove the last three letters of this result. 
Change the seventh letter to an “o”. 
You will get a fruit. 
What is it?
2. Take a seven-letter word. 
Remove the first two letters. 
Switch the last two letters. 
Add an “se” at the end. 
You will get a synonym of the original word. 
What are these words?

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All You Need Is Lovely Letters” (15 Of ’Em) Slice:
Groupthink, groupspeak, groupsolve

Alfred Dreyfus, Mark Twain and Georg Simon Ohm were noted figures who lived during the 19th Century. 
Their surnames contain fifteen different letters – all the letters you need to spell all members of a particular group. 
What group is this?
Hint: This group is often designated by using a four-word phrase (noun-preposition-article-noun).

Riffing Off Shortz And Horn Slices:
McPuzzling McJobs in the fields of renown  

Will Shortz’s September 13th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Judy Horn, of Reading, Massachusetts, reads:
Name a famous person with the initials M. C. The first initial and last name anagram to the person’s field of renown. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Horn Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a puzzle-maker. Rearrange the combined letters of the first and last names to spell the first names of the two men who most recently served exactly eight years as New York City’s mayor.
One of these first names sounds like the surname of a starting outfielder the 1972, 1973 and 1974 World Champion Oakland Athletics. The other first name is the surname of a pitcher with 288 career victories.
Who is this puzzle-maker?
Who are these mayors?
Who are the ballplayers?
Hint: These two mayors’ first names also together spell the name of a beautiful beach on Saint Lucia’s southern coast.
ENTREE #2:
Name two people, one living one dead, who share the same name. The initials of the name are M. C. 
Switch the third and fifth letters of the last name and change the fourth and sixth letters to different vowels. 
The result is a field of renown that both people share. What is it? 
ENTREE #3:
Name a pretty famous person with the initials M. C. The first initial and last name anagram to an abbreviation of a three-syllable word meaning a “harmonious interaction between people working together,” an interaction required of this person as a member of a particulal cast of characters.
The first initial and last name of this person also anagram to an abbreviation of a three-syllable word that is an informal term for a fixer of automobiles. 
Who is this pretty famous person?
What are the two abbreviations?
ENTREE #4:
Name a famous creative person. 
The last name – followed by the second, fourth and fifth letters of one kind of literature the person created – spell another kind of literature the person created. 
Who is this person?
What are the two kinds of literature the person created?  
ENTREE #5:
Name a somewhat famous past person with the initials M. C. The first, third and last letters of the surname, followed by the sixth, first and fifth letters of the first name, in order, spell a word for one of the person’s fields of renown.
Replace the last letter of this six-letter word with a 2-letter nickname for guys named Sheeran or Asner followed by a pronoun that is always capitalized. 
Move the last four letters of this 8-letter result to the beginning to spell a different career field the person could have followed (given his doctoral degree from Harvard) but chose not to follow.
Who is this person?
What is one of the person’s fields of renown?
What is the career field the person chose not to follow?
ENTREE #6:
Name a pretty famous past French person with the initials H. M. Take the surname. Remove the initial M, leaving a string of six letters. 
Replace the fifth letter with a duplicate of the second letter. Insert an “r” between the first and second letters. 
The result is the French word for this French person’s profession. 
Who is this person?
What is the person’s profession?


Dessert Menu

Drunken Dessert:
Perversification

What is the two-word title of the following verse? 
Explain your answer.
Hint: Although the verse is not a haiku, it does contain seventeen words. Ignore nine of them.
Aping Bing,
Sal did sing:
“In a glass
For a lass
I pour gin...
Gals! Dont sin!
Note: Yes, I am aware that a haiku contains 17 syllables, not 17 words... but my 17 words contain only 18 syllables. Close enough!


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, September 11, 2020

“Weight, weight, don’t tell me!” There’s vittles in this critter! Objectifying deities, just for fun; “Adam and Eve on a raft!” Uprooting all that racket!

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 3(7!) SERVED

Schpuzzle Of TheWeek:
“Weight, weight, don’t tell me!”

Rearrange the letters of a famous United States landmark to form three units of measure: one of weight, one of mass and one of volume.  
What is this landmark?
What are the three units of measure?
Hint: One of the three units of measure is an abbreviation.


Appetizer Menu

Feral Food For Thought Appetizer:
“There’s vittles in this critter!”


The word “deer” contains one set of double letters. 
Name an animal whose name contains two sets of  double letters. 
Drop one letter from each of the sets and rearrange the result to get a favorite food of the animal.
What are this animal? 
What is its favorite food? 


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“That’s rad, Dude!” Slice:
Uprooting all that racket!

Name a product brand designed to eradicate a chest-racking cough. 
Add a letter to the end and divide it in two to name legislation designed to eradicate racketeering. 
What is this brand?
What is this legislation?

Riffing Off Shortz and Crane Slices:
Objectifying deities, just for fun 

Will Shortz’s September 6th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Jeremy Crane of Madison, Wisconsin, reads:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. The first half of the name, phonetically, names a common object. The second half of the name, by spelling, names another object that is often put inside the first one. What is it? 
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Crane Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a puzzle-maker, first and last names. 
A pronoun appears in one of the puzzle-maker’s two names. Remove it.
Take the name you truncated. Move its second letter an even-number of letters later in the circular alphabet. 
Divide that even number by two. Move the remaining letters in the truncated name that divided number of letters later in the circular alphabet. 
Your result (consisting of the altered first name and unaltered last name) should be two creatures that are often mistaken for one another.
Who is this puzzle-maker?
What are the two similar creatures?
ENTREE #2:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
The first half of the name, by spelling, is a Latin phrase often used correctly by intelligent people, and often misused by people who just want to sound intelligent. It means “intrinsically.” 
The second half of the name, phonetically, is a synonym of “inauthentic” or “bogus.”
A certain president a-Tweeting might write, for example, “My opponent is ___ ___ _____!” misusing and misspelling the Latin phrase (by replacing an “e” with an  “ay”) and ending with the same synonym.
His opponent might respond by writing, “The president is ___ __ _____,” correctly using and correctly spelling the Latin phrase and ending with the same synonym.
Who is this ancient mythological deity?
What is the Latin phrase that means “intrinsically”?
What did the president Tweet? 
How did his opponent respond? 
ENTREE #3:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
The first half of the name, phonetically, names a body part. 
The second half of the name sounds very much like a another body part. 
What are these body parts?
What is the mythological deity?
ENTREE #4:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. The second half of the name, if you rearrange its letters, names a one-time teen idol who later had a hit with a song about a civil rights icon, two presidents, and the brother of one of those presidents. 
The first half of the name, spells a word for what the teen idol is striking in either of the images pictured here.
What is the mythological deity?
Who is the teen idol, and what does he strike?
ENTREE #5:
Name a deity in ancient mythology, one associated with the deity in Entree #4.
The second syllable of the name spells a synonym of “song” – like, for example, the 1961 hit song the teen idol in Entree #4 was often asked to sing.   
The first syllable of the name, if spelled backward, becomes a verb for what the teen idol would do, besides singing them, to subsequent songs, including one recorded by Mott the Hoople and another by T.Rex. 
What is the mythological deity?
What is the synonym of “song”?
What would the teen idol do to subsequent songs?
ENTREE #6:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
Add a letter to the beginning to spell the surname of a sculptor. 
Add a letter to the beginning of the surname of this sculptor to spell the surname of an actor who once portrayed a movie character whose first and last names both begin with the same double-vowel (like Alley Oop’s gal, Oola Oop).
If you instead add two different letters to the beginning of the surname of the sculptor, the result will spell the surname of a composer of symphonies.
What is this mythical deity?
Who are the sculptor, actor and composer?
ENTREE #7:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
The first two syllables of the name, phonetically, name a word associated with Billy Preston, Angela Davis, Jimi Hendrix, Artis Gilmore and the Jackson 5. 
The remaining syllables of the name, phonetically, names two words associated with the word “steep.” 
What deity is this?
What is the word associated with Billy Preston et al.?
What are the two words associated with “steep”?
ENTREE #8:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
If you remove the second-last letter of the name and rearrange the remaining letters, you’ll spell things one might guzzle. 
But if you instead remove the first letter of the deity’s name, you’ll spell a kind of puzzle (with no rearrangement of letters necessary). 
What is this deity?
What might one guzzle?
What is the puzzle?
ENTREE #9:
Name a deity in ancient mythology. 
The first half of the name spells the first name of a living singer and the surname of another living singer. 
The second half of the name, if you spell it backward, spells the first name of a daughter of an American writer, one who was used as the basis for the character of Joan of Arc in a novel. 
What is this deity?
Who are the two singers?
What is the name of the writer’s daughter?
Hint: The surname of one of the two singers is a homophone of a deity in ancient mythology.


Dessert Menu

“Battle Creek In A Bowl” Dessert:
“Adam and Eve on a raft!”

Name an entree one might order from a family restaurant in two words. 
Switch the second letter of the first word with the second letter of the second word. 
The result is a body of water and what might be floating in it.
What is the entree?
What is the body of water and what might be floating in it?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, September 4, 2020

One rascally yet romantic puzzle; The “person in history” mystery; Terrific Trif-f-fecta, plus three; Creating a creature of habitat; Moonstones on the map?

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 3(7!) SERVED

Schpuzzle Of TheWeek:
Creating a creature of habitat

Take the surnames of families created by John Ernst Steinbeck, Jerome David Salinger and Louisa May Alcott. 
Change one letter in each name. 
The result is a creature and two of its habitats.
What are these fictional names?
What are the creature and its two habitats?

Appetizer Menu

Name Games Appetizer:
Terrific Trif-f-fecta, plus three

Trif-f-fecta
1. Think of a small US city, best known for a specific event, that contains a double letter and has the same number of letters as the state in which it is located. 
Add one letter to make the double letter a triple one. Split this result into three words: (1), a type of legal document; 
(2), a currently “trendy” boy's name; and 
(3), an overarching term for the activity for which this small city is best known. 
What are the city and the three parts of its “expanded” name?

Count those letters
2. Think of a landmark partially located in a U.S. state whose name has the same number of letters as the landmark's common name. The full, official name of the landmark adds one additional word that has one fewer letter than the full location of the remainder of this landmark. What are the state and landmark? Where is the rest of it located?

Female nomenclature
3. Think of a common female name. 
Drop the first letter. Split the remaining letters in half to obtain two nicknames for this name. 
What are the name and the two nicknames?

Papal schism
4. Think of a papal name. 
Split this name in two to obtain a possible nickname for this pope and a policy statement issued by a pope.


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Harri the Spy but not Rht and Scarlt Slice:
One rascally yet romantic puzzle

Take the first names of two fictional characters, a rascal and a romantic. 
From the rascal’s name remove the nickname of an extraterrestrial fictional character. 
Leave the romantic’s name just as it is. 
The result is the name of a car. 
What car is it?

Riffing Off Shortz and Young Slices:
The “person in history” mystery 

Will Shortz’s August 30th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minnesota (who runs the blog Puzzleria!), reads:
Name a famous person in history with a five-letter first name and four-letter last name. The letters of the last name can be rearranged to name a popular game. And the letters in the first name can be rearranged to name an action in this game. Who is this famous person?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Young Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a puzzle-maker who is not-at-all famous, in six and five letters. The 11 letters, if combined, can be rearranged to name three words:
1. a popular game animal,
2. a newborn critter, especially one that...
3. ____ about, after leaving the pouch.
Who is this puzzle-maker?
What are the three words?
Hint: The popular game animal is a homophone of one of the 28 syllables (including the word in the blank) in the clues for the the three words).  
ENTREE #2:
Consider the two images in the illustration pictured here. Write a two-word caption for each, in five and six letters.  
The letters of each word in the caption on the left can be rearranged to spell each word in the caption on the right.
What are your two captions? 
ENTREE #3:
Name what you may be seeking, in four and five letters, when you visit websites such as Travelocity or Expedia. 
Switch the order of the two words. 
Rearrange the letters of each word to form a two-word phrase that is synonymous with “things that are more likely to happen” or “more likely possibilities.”
What are Travelocity or Expedia visitors seeking?
What is the synonymous two-word phrase?
ENTREE #4:
Take the last two words, in seven and six letters, in a book title by a east-coast-based espionage thriller novelist. 
Rearrange the letters in each word to form the last two words in a book title by a west-coast-based author of historical romance novels. What are these two book titles?
ENTREE #5:
Name a two-word phrase for what lies on either side of what flows southward down New York State. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for certain “barehoof” creatures.
Each word in the phrases contains six letters.
What are these two 2-word phrases?
ENTREE #6:
Name a two-word phrase for one of three things Al Capone had since he was 18 years old. The letters in each word can be rearranged to name 45-year-old MPG regulations and what those regulations pertain to.
Each of the four words (one of which is an ACRONYM) contains four letters.
What are these four 4-letter words?
ENTREE #7:
Name a two-word phrase for a kind of museum. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for something you might have that would preclude you from adopting a certain vermin as a pet.
Each phrase contains ten total letters.
What are these two 10-letter phrases?
ENTREE #8:
Name a two-word phrase for transactions that might take place at an automobile dealership. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name one two-word phrase for what you might find either in the Navy, or at a theme park, or on a newspaper staff. 
Each phrase contains twelve total letters.
What are these two 12-letter phrases?
Hint: One of the four words is hyphenated.
ENTREE #9:
Name a two-word phrase for a window at a hotel that can range from around noon to about 3pm, typically. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for what poultry farmers don’t want to find in their coops or on their roosts. 
Each phrase contains twelve total letters.
What are these two 12-letter phrases?
Hint: One of the four words is hyphenated.
ENTREE #10:
Name a two-word phrase that describes Tatum Riley, Courtney Shayne and Debbie Dinsdale. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for someone, say, who slams his fist on the chessboard after his opponent says “check.”
Each phrase contains a four-letter word followed by a five letter word.
What are these two 2-word phrases?
ENTREE #11:
Name a two-word 14-letter phrase for garments you would find in the wardrobe of a stage production of “The Ten Commandments.” 
Reverse the order of the words. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for “grim truths.”
What are these two phrases?
ENTREE #12:
Consider the two images in the illustration pictured here. Write a caption for each, in four and three letters.
The letters of each word in the caption on the left can be rearranged to spell each word in the caption on the right.
What are your two captions? 
ENTREE #13: 
Name a two-word place on earth where you can visit Garmisch-Partenkirchen, Königssee, Neuschwanstein and Eibsee. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for what the Magi might have heard right after the nativity of Jesus.
Each phrase contains ten letters.
What are this place and this phrase?
ENTREE #14:
Take two words: the title of a famous poem and the surname of the poet who wrote it, in five and six letters. 
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for what a modern dairy farmer must do if his automated apparatus attached to his cows’ udders utterly stops functioning! 
What are this poem title, poet and two-word phrase?
ENTREE #15:
Name a two-word phrase, in eight and seven letters, that describes a pupil’s performance of Saint-Saens’ Symphony No.  3
The letters in each word can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for a newspaper story written about 40 years ago that includes the names Foster Brooks, Dean Martin, Bob Hope, Rich Little and Redd Foxx. 
What are these two phrases?
ENTREE #16:
 Name a two-word phrase, in five and four letters, that describes the following six: Chesley Sullenberger, Minnie Vautrin, Raoul Wallenberg, Martin Luther King, Jr., Mother Teresa or Nelson Mandela. 
The letters in each word of this phrase can be rearranged to name a two-word phrase for a hairy part of an equine creature.
What are these two phrases?


Dessert Menu

Precious Dessert:
Moonstones on the map?

A word in a name on the U.S. map sounds like a letter of the alphabet. 
Replace the word with the letter. 
Rearranging the letters of this result spells types of precious gemstones. 
What are these gemstones and the name on the map?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.