Friday, August 18, 2017

Berry’s fare is on the air!; Something unwelcome this way came; A synthesis of antithesis; AC/DC elecTriCity

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (876 + 54) SERVED

Welcome to our August 18th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 

Our featured puzzles this week are our Rip-Offs! – a half-dozen of ‘em! 
That is because we are ripping off not only puzzlemaster Will Shortz but also one of Puzzleria!’s own puzzlemasters, Patrick J. Berry, who has contributed scads of wonderful puzzles to this blog, including ingenious cryptic crosswords.
(We are in good company – a group mentioned in this week’s Triplet Cities Slice also ripped off Berry!)
So, Dr. Shortz choose a puzzle  submitted to him by our Puzzleria!master.  It was featured as the August 13th National Public Radio Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle. 
Congratulations, Patrick!

Also on this week’s menus are:
One unwelcome Appetizer,
One “Tale of Three Cities” Slice, and
One of those stressed-out Desserts.

As always, please enjoy.

Appetizer Menu

American History Mystery Appetizer:
Something unwelcome this way came 

A phrase containing four consecutive words of 5, 2, 4 and 5 letters made headlines this past week, and may well appear in future United States history books. Remove six of those 16 letters and rearrange them to form a word that means “an environment promoting the growth of something, especially something unwelcome.” The phrase containing the 16 letters is a controversial statement spoken about the deadly incident to which the phrase alluded.

The remaining ten letters of the four consecutive words in the phrase can also be arranged to form words pertaining this unwelcome incident. Words formed from those ten rearranged letters appear in each of the following four phrasal snippets that might have appeared in news accounts about the incident:
⇨ “...mobs decried undocumented aliens ...” 
⇨ “...no bail was granted to the alleged perpetrator of the deadly mess...”
⇨ “...racial bias clashed with the solemn tone from clergy ...”
⇨ “...calling names boils over violently...”

What are the four consecutive words in the phrase?  What is the six-letter word for the environment promoting unrest?  What are the words in the snippets that can be rearraged to complete the phrase?


MENU 

Triplet Cities Slice:
AC/DC elecTriCity

Take the first and final words from the title of a hit song by a band contemporary to the Beatles. Add a letter to the end of the first word to form the two-word name of a well known U.S. city. The band’s name consists of two other well known U.S. cities. What is this band and their hit song? 

Ripping Off Shortz And Berry Slices:
Berry’s fare is on the air!

Will Shortz’s August 13th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Puzzlerian! and Puzzleria! contributor Patrick Berry, reads: 
Name a long-running TV show in two words. Add a C and rearrange the result to name another long-running TV show also in two words. What shows are these? And here's a hint: Both shows are currently on the air, although the second one was most popular the past.
Puzzleria’s! Ripping Off Shortz And Berry Slices read:
ONE:
Name a long-running TV show currently on the air, in two words. Remove its final two letters and rearrange the result to name a nearly-century old clothing brand that, fittingly, is also the name of a nearly two-mile high peak in the Grand Teton Range. What show and brand/peak are these? 
TWO:
Name a TV game show that appeared on the Nickelodeon TV channel, in two words. Rearrange the letters in the first word to name a long-running network sitcom. 
Rearrange the letters in the second word to form two words of 3 and 4 letters. 
The 3-letter word is a homophone of a letter of the alphabet. Add this letter to the letters of the word “antler” and rearrange the mix to form a 7-letter word that is the first word of a 2-word hangout frequented by the sitcom’s characters.
The 4-letter word is the second word of the 2-word hangout. 
What are this Nickelodeon game show and sitcom? Name the hangout in the sitcom. 
THREE:
Name a long-running TV show in three words and 11 letters. Subtract an L and rearrange the result to name what Dorothy might have shouted to her little black dog, in two words, when he nipped at Scarecrow’s straw leg or yipped at Tinman’s creaky squeaky joints. long-running TV show also in two words. 
What show is this? What shout is this? 
FOUR:
Name a long-running TV show in two words and nine letters. It is currently on the air. Rearrange the result to name a two-word phrase describing “One of These Days” and, perhaps to a lesser degree, “Fearless.”  
What show is this? What  description is this? 
FIVE:
Name a long-running TV show in two words and ten letters. Rearrange its letters to name the type of competition, also in two words, that occurred in the season finale of the show’s first season. In the competition, the winner sang a song about a domestic task.
What show is this? What competition is this?
SIX:
Name a long-running and currently airing TV show in two words and ten letters. Rearrange the letters to name something you might see at Wimbledon, also in two words. Now rearrange the letters to name something you might hear at Little Caesars Arena, the BMO Harris Bradley Center or Target Center (but probably not at the United Center), also in two words.
What show is this? What might you see at Wimbledon but probably not hear the the United Center?

Hint: The two words of the TV show echo last week’s “Bluish/Blush” Appetizer on Puzzleria!

Dessert Menu

Stressed Dessert:
A Synthesis of antithesis

Name a word for a feeling a person might experience as a result of being stressed. Name another word that is the antithesis of being stressed.
The words do have much in common, however:
1. They have the same number of letters. 
2. Each has just one vowel; it is the same vowel.
3. Each has a string of four consecutive consonants.
What are these two words?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, August 11, 2017

Erich Maria Remarkable; Misspelling test; Somewhere over a couple color bands of the rainbow... James and the huge impeachment; Stooges in stogie-smoke-filled rooms

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (876 + 54) SERVED  

Welcome to our August 11th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 

On this week’s menus are half-a-dozen puzzles:
One Roy G. Biv Appetizer,
One remarkable Appetizer,
One honeybee of a Slice,
Two peachy-keen Slices ripped-off from a “Willow tree, and
One stogie-smoke-filled Dessert.

So dont be a stooge or a Scrooge. Lie back in your La-Z-Boy like it’s a luge and light up a stogie that’s HUGE. 
And puff on our puzzles.
As always, enjoy sifting through our smokescreens.

Appetizer Menu

Spectra Vision Appetizer:
Somewhere over a couple color bands of the rainbow 

Insert an “i” within a 5-letter word associated with a certain color to form a word associated with a different color. These colors are more-or-less on opposite ends of the visible spectrum.

Put the two colors in alphabetical order, side-by-side without a space. Remove the last letter of the first color and double the first letter of the second color. The result is an adjective that often modifies “vision.”

What are these two colors and the two words associated with them? What is the adjective that often modifies “vision”? 

All Noisy On The Eastern Front Appetizer:
Erich Maria Remarkable

Among the most memorable words in a well-reported remark that made headlines this past week were three nouns, along with a common conjunction. Rearrange the letters of the 16 combined letters of those four words to form three new two-syllable nouns:
1. The first noun (4 letters) applies to the person to whom the remark was directed (but not, reportedly, to the speaker of the remark).
2. The second noun (6 letters) applies to the speaker of the remark (but not, apparently, to the father of the person to whom the remark was directed – particularly when this father was engaged in “walking softly and carrying a big club”).
3. The third noun (also 6 letters) should apply to any Earthling who believes in “a higher power” and who has heard the remark). A one-syllable homograph of this two-syllable noun is a word for what these Earthlings frankly don’t have as long as the likes of this “remarker” and this “remarkee” remain in positions of power, influence and responsibulity.
What are the four words among those the remark? What are the three nouns formed by rearranging these four words?
Hint:
#1 noun begins with a w.
#2 noun begins with a d.
#3 noun begins with a p.


MENU 

Tori Spelling Bee-Movie Slice:
Misspelling test

A 6-letter word is often misspelled by replacing its fifth letter with a different but incorrect vowel. Misspell the word in this way using lowercase letters. Delete the first letter and spell the result backward to form a 5-letter word associated with three-year-olds. It is also a word associated with a television character portrayed by Gene Barry.

Return to the original 6-letter word that is often misspelled. Spell it correctly this time, again using lowercase letters. Rotate the second and fourth letters 180 degrees about their vertical axes and, again, delete the first letter. View the result in a mirror and capitalize what now appears to be the first letter. The result is the title of a book set during the era of a war, the movie version of which was set during the era of a later war.

What is the 6-letter word that is often misspelled? What is the 5-letter word associated with three-year-olds and Gene Barrys character? What is the book/movie title?


Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
James and the huge impeachment

Will Shortz’s August 6th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
The word INAUGURATION contains the letters of GNU, GOAT, IGUANA and AGOUTI, which are all animals. The name of what 9-letter animal can be spelled from the letters of inauguration?
Puzzleria’s! Ripping Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
The word IMPEACHMENT contains the letters of HAM, PEA, PATE (not the crown of the head, the one pronounced pah tay) and MINT, which are all foods. Then, of course, there are PEACH and PECAN, which are also kinds of PIE. 
The name of what 9-letter food can be spelled from the letters of IMPEACHMENT to name another kind of pie?
The name of what 8-letter food prepared and EATen by North American Indians can be spelled from the letters of IMPEACHMENT? (This food which I learned about from reading a novel by Nikki Rajala (creator of last week’s Michelin/Michelob puzzle) – is sometimes spelled as a 7-letter word.)
The name of what 6-letter mint (that my kitten Smitten enjoys EATing) can be spelled from the letters of IMPEACHMENT?

TWO:
The word RESIGNATION contains the letters of ANTS, RATS, GNATS, GOATS, GATORS and TIGERS, which are all animals. The letters of RESIGNATION can be used to spell the names of what:
7-letter member of the congressional body that can vote to convict a sitting president based on articles of impeachment?
→ 7-letter high crime, other than bribery, that a president might be convicted of?
6-letter color of the sitting president’s hair?
3-letter color of the sitting president’s skin?
7-letter adjective meaning failure to exercise intelligence and sound judgment?
8-letter adjective meaning lacking knowledge or comphehension?
7-letter adjective meaning most silly?
8-letter Spanish-language title for Miss Universe 2010?
5-letter name of a stooge (named Howard, but not Moe) upon whose radio and TV broadcasts the sitting president often appeared, pre-POTUS?


Dessert Menu

De-Doubling Dessert:
Stooges in stogie-smoke-filled rooms

Remove all double adjacent letters from  the last name of a politician lately in the news. (For example, Oklahoma representative Steve Russell – who is not the answer – would become “Steve Rue.”) 
The politician’s last name, after removing the letters spells out the first name of a another stooge – or, to be more precise, the first name of another Stooge.

Who is this politician?   

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, August 4, 2017

Brewing beers by shifting gears? Human “Anat-toe-knee” ramifies like a tree; Researching for Needles (pop. 5,000) in Cal-i-forn-eye-haystacks; In pursuit of a pair of POTI

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER (765 + 43) SERVED


Welcome to our August 4th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 

Our featured puzzle this week is a clever challenge created by a friend of mine, Nikki Rajala of Rockville, Minnesota. Her creation is an Appetizer titled “Brewing beers by shifting gears?” It involves automobiles and beers: two things that ought never be mixed on the road but can safely be served up in a puzzle parlor such as Puzzleria!

I got to know Nikki when we worked together in a newsroom in St. Cloud, Minnesota. She is a wonderful writer and published author who is on the verge of publishing Book 2 in a series of historical novels about a young French-Canadian voyageur named Andre.  

Merci beaucoup, Nikki, for sharing a slice of your creativity with Puzzleria! (And Kiitos paleon too! ...which Nikki informs me is the Finnish equivalent of the same sentiment).

Also on this week’s menus are seven other chewy challenges:
One Slice not of POT PIE but of POTI,
Five Riffing/Ripping-Off Shortz Slices about Palindrhometowns, U.S.A, and
One Dessert that doubles as an anatomy lesson.

So hop into your auto, take an inventory of its parts, shift into Drive, drive down to Puzzleria!, bite into a slice of POTI, shift some cities and states into reverse and, for Dessert, take an inventory of your body parts.
And, as always, enjoy the ride.

Appetizer Menu

Bland Royalty Appetizer:
Brewing beers by shifting gears?

What brand name for a particular part of an automobile, if you change its last two letters, creates the brand name of a beer?



MENU 

Lists Of Leaders Slice:
In pursuit of a pair of POTI

Consider the following two lists of significant leaders who served during the Twentieth and/or Twenty-first centuries:
List A:
List B:


All leaders on List A share something in common. 
All leaders on List B share something in common.
What President Of England 2.0... oops, I mean, what President Of The United States belongs on List A? Explain why. 
Two POTUSes (or POTI, if you prefer a more elegant plural form) appear on List B. Who is the third President Of The United States that belongs on List B? Explain why.
Now explain why the President Of The United States who belongs on List A shares the “something in common” with the other leaders on the list in an extra-special “twofold” way.
Finally, which leader on  List A shares the “something in common” with others on that list in an extra-special “threefold” way. Explain.
Hint: One might argue that both Kim Jong-un and his father Kim Jong-il belong on List A and not List B. But one might also argue that they both belong on List B and not List A.

Ripping Off Shortz And Krozel Slices:
Researching for Needles (pop. 5,000) in Cal-i-forn-eye-haystacks

Will Shortz’s July 30th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joe Krozel, reads: 
This week’s challenge... might require a little research. There is a city somewhere in the United States with a population of about 24,000 people. Change the last letter in the name of its state. If you now read the city plus the altered name of its state together, the result is a palindrome – that is, it reads backward and foreward the same. What city is it?
Puzzleria’s! Ripping Off Shortz Slices read:
ONE:
This puzzle might require a little research. There is an island somewhere in the United States with a population of about 1,600 people. Change the last letter in the name of a state that has something in common with this island that no other state has. If you now read the island plus the altered name of its state together, the result is a palindrome – that is, it reads backward and foreward the same. What island is it? What state shares something in common with the island?
TWO:
This puzzle might require a little research. There is a town somewhere in the United States with a population of about 150 people. Remove the last two letters in its name. If you now read the altered name of the city plus the  name of its state together, the result is a palindrome – that is, it reads backward and foreward the same. What city is it?
Hint: The palindrome is a king’s name sandwiched between half a laugh and a sigh of delight.
THREE:
This puzzle might require a little research. There is a city somewhere in the United States with a population of about four times that of Zion, Illinoiz (sic). Take the state this city is in and move its last letter to the beginning of the city, then discard the remaining letters of the state. If you now read all but the final four letters of this result backward, the result will be a different state. The final four letters of the result, read foreward, appear at the end of several U.S. cities, usually those situated near bodies of water. Althought the city you are to find is indeed situated near a body of water, the four letters at the end of its name are misleading. The city is eponymous. Its entire name is the surname of a pioneer settler in the region. What city is it?
FOUR:
This puzzle might require a little research. There is a city somewhere in the United States with a population of about 24,000 people. Take three consecutive letters from the name of its state. Insert them, in order, somewhere within the name of the city. (where you insert them will depend on which three consecutive letters you choose.)
If you now read the altered name of this city, the result is a number that would seem to be much larger that the population of the city. What city is it?
FIVE:
This puzzle might require a little research. Remove two letters from a state somewhere in the United States. If you now read the altered name of the state backward, the result is the surname of a well known actor or actress. What STATE is it?

Dessert Menu

Tinkering With Frankenstein Dessert:
Human “Anat-toe-knee” ramifies like a tree

Name a word for a human body part. Strings of consecutive letters beginning with the word’s third, fourth and fifth letters spell three other body parts. 
➔Six letters from the word can be rearranged to form plural body parts. 
➔Three letters can be rearranged to form other plural body parts.
➔Five letters can be rearranged to name something that protects body parts.
➔Five letters can be rearranged to name a word meaning physique.
➔Four letters can be rearranged to name a word meaning a body’s shape.
➔Four letters can be rearranged to name a particular collection of hundreds of similar very thin body parts.
What are these ten words related to the human body? 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.