Friday, January 18, 2019

Laffer Curves and funny business; “Monogramania!” Fodder for foodies, from noodles to nuts; Gluttons for punnish mental morsels; BenD Sinister;

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Gluttons for punnish mental morsels

Name what famished people would do – in a phrase of two 6-letter words beginning with D and H – if they took a certain facetious hyperbolic expression literally. 
Rearrange these 12 letters to form more suitable consumables for the famished. 
What consumables are these?



Appetizer Menu

Try Beating These Conundrums Appetizer:
Fodder for foodies, from noodles to nuts

🥁1. Think of the first name of a celebrity chef that contains “IG”. Change the “IG” to a “UT” to get a brand name condiment.

🥁2. Think of a word used to describe a speech made by a particular president. 
Drop the last letter and rearrange to name a deli meat.

🥁3. Think of a noodle dish in two words. Replace the space with a G to name a company traded on the NASDAQ.

🥁4. Think of a type of nut in five letters. 
Shift each letter four places later in the alphabet. The result will be an apex predator.


🥁5. Think of a three-word phrase meaning “perfection”. 
Insert an S somewhere inside and remove the spaces to name a food that requires precise timing in its preparation.


MENU

Economic Currents Slice:
Laffer Curves and funny business  


Name a four-syllable word sometimes associated with home appliances, outlets and boxes (but boxes smaller than the kind of boxes found in “big box stores”). 
The final two syllables of this word sound like a word sometimes associated with the economy and with charging things.  
The four-syllable word and two-syllable word are both associated with currents. 
What are these two words?

Riffing Off Shortz And Matthews Slices:
BenD Sinister

Will Shortz’s January 13th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by listener James Matthews of Little Rock, Arkansas, reads:
Make a 9-letter word meaning “left” using only a B and one D. Can you do it?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Matthews Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Make an 8-letter word for a region of France that contains no R, M and Y. Can you do it?

ENTREE #2:
Make a 5-letter word meaning “left or subsided” using only B’s, E’s and one D. Can you do it?


ENTREE #3:
Make a 2-letter abbreviation, using only a B and one D (with a period after each), associated with a person who apparently “left” the face of the earth. Can you do it?


ENTREE #4:
Make a 7-letter word meaning “moral” using only the letters of an L and one H. Can you do it?

ENTREE #5:
Make a 5-letter adjective using only a B and one D. The adjective often precedes a homophone of a contraction (of two words) that eliminates more than a letter or two. 
Can you do it? 

ENTREE #6:
Make a 7-letter word for a mollusk using a B alone. 
The mollusk has a shell lined with “Hester Prynne.” 
Can you do it?




Dessert Menu

National Initials Dessert:
“Monogramania!”

Name a nationally broadcast weekly show, in three words. 
The first and last names of a person featured on the broadcast begin with the initial letters of the first and third words in the broadcast’s name. 
The initial letter of the person’s college degree is the same as the initial letter of the broadcast’s second word. 
What is the name of this broadcast? 
What is the name of this person?

Note to Puzzlerians!:
A few weeks ago, a gentleman named Gregory Gray contacted me. He is Editor-in-Chief of a biweekly digital puzzle magazine titled “Topple.”
Mr. Gray asked me to take a gander at Topple and share my opinion of it with Puzzleria!s followers. He also encouraged me to share with you this link to the most recent edition of Topple. You can find out everything you need to know about Topple by clicking the FAQ tab.

There is a nominal fee for downloading issues of Topple. I believe there is more than enough puzzle-bang for your buck to justify the price. There are also samples available for those who may want to browse a bit before buying.

Topple’s graphics are clean and creative. The variety is wide, with puzzles and games for all tastes. There is a mix of original and established puzzles.

I find the “feel” of Topple to be polished and professional, yet inviting and friendly. Its staff (editor, art director, puzzle artist, and a variety of contributing puzzlers) obviously are very creative and cyber-savvy. But, better yet, their writing displays a playful way with words, and you can tell they are enjoying themselves. They suggest, for example, that Topple consumers print out the games and puzzles so as to “enjoy the full tactile experience” they deserve, adding, “You can even use a stapler if you're feeling frisky.”
Whether you are feeling frisky or not, Topple is worth checking out.

Lego... 

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, January 11, 2019

“Damn ‘Rhettorical’ questions!” Welcome to Synonymity City; Sergeants and surgeons; “What’s in your mixing bowl? What isn’t?” Infield shifts and one nutty outfield mix-up

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED
 Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“Damn Rhettorical questions!”

Name a common 5-word rhetorical question. 
Change the second word to a different form of the same verb and remove the space between the third and fourth words, forming a single word. 
Move the question mark to the end of that new single word, and place a period in the place where it was. 
The result is a new, shorter question, and the answer to that question.
What is this rhetorical question? 
What are the new question and its answer? 
Hint: The new question was one people were asking back in the 1990s.


Appetizer Menu 

Unbeatable Conundrums Appetizer:
Infield shifts and one nutty outfield mix-up

🥁1. Think of the name of a sports team in five letters. 
Shift each letter six places later in the alphabet to get the first name of a well-known sports announcer from the same area as the sports team.

🥁2. Think of a geologic feature in five letters where some sporting events take place. 
Shift each letter nine places later in the alphabet to name an artificial structure for different sporting events.

🥁3. Think of the brand name of a wind surfing company, in eight letters. Drop the third letter and shift the remaining letters seven places later in the alphabet. 
The result will be an adverb that describes a rough windsurfing experience.

🥁4. Think of a common two word French term used in a sport. Rearrange into a word related to insanity.



MENU

“Hill Street Blues” meets 
“Grey’s Anatomy” Slice:  
Sergeants and surgeons

Name a past television police drama title in two words. Add a letter to the beginning of the first word to form a verb. 
Let’s say a certain health professional provides you with the second word in the television drama title. If so, this will make it easier for you to do what the verb denotes. 
What is this title?

Riffing Off Shortz And Fagliano Slices:
Welcome to Synonymity City

Will Shortz’s January 6th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by Joel Fagliano, the digital puzzles editor of The New York Times, reads:
Name a major U.S. city in 10 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get two 5-letter words that are synonyms. What are they?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Fagliano Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a major southern U.S. city in 10 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get the first name of a character, beginning with G, in a classic sitcom, and the first word of what another character in the sitcom is called.
Who are these characters? 
What is the city? 
Hint: The second word in what the second character is called is a letter of the alphabet, spelled out. That letter (just the letter, not the letter spelled-out) appears within the other character’s first name. 

ENTREE #2:
Name a major Midwestern U.S. city in 10 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a two-word caption, in 7 and 3 letters beginning with S and S, for the image pictured here. 
What is this city?

ENTREE #3:
Name a major western U.S. city in 11 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a possessive 6-letter proper noun beginning with F and a 5-letter common noun beginning with B that describe Cheryl Bae in 1985, who at the time was a recent Brigham Young graduate. What is this city? 

ENTREE #4:
Name a major southeastern U.S. city in 12 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a possessive 5-letter proper noun beginning with B and 7-letter common noun beginning with P that form a caption for the image pictured here. 
What is this city?

ENTREE #5:
Name a southern U.S. city in 10 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get two words, in 4 and 6 letters beginning with N and A, to indicate what “Christ the King” is vis-a-vis  “What Child is this?”  What is this city? 

ENTREE #6: 
Name a Midwestern U.S. city in 9 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get two plural words, of 5 and 4 letters, that you might find in a cash register till, as pictured here. 
What is this city?

ENTREE #7: 
Name a very northern U.S. city in 9 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a 4-letter word for a kind of pain one may suffer and a 5-letter word beginning with G for how one may respond to the pain. What is this city?

ENTREE #8: 
Name a southwestern U.S. city in 10 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a 6-letter adjective and 4-letter noun that might be a caption for the actors and actresses pictured here. All performed in a one-word titled movie together. 
What is this city?

ENTREE #9: 
Name an eastern U.S. city in 9 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to form a false, oxymoronic phrase, a 5-letter adjective and 4-letter plural noun, for a byproduct of cigarette smoke. 
What is this city?

ENTREE #10: 
Name a south central U.S. city in 12 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get the appendages – one a 4-letter word, the other two words of 4 letters each – of two different creatures one might see in an aquarium. What is this city?

ENTREE #11: 
Name a northeastern U.S. city in 10 letters. If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a 6-letter stage name of a singer and a 4-letter singular form of a plural word in a well known song by the singer. What is this city?

ENTREE #12: 
Name an eastern U.S. city in 12 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a caption for the image shown here. 
The caption consists of a 6-letter possessive proper noun and a 6-letter slang plural noun meaning “inferior things.”
What is this city?

ENTREE #13: 
Name an major central U.S. city in 9 letters. 
If you have the right one, you can rearrange its letters to get a caption for the image shown here. 
The caption consists of a hyphenated phrase in two words of 3 and 6 letters beginning with an I and an S. 
What is this city?


Dessert Menu

Mixed-Up Dessert:
“What’s in your mixing bowl? What isn’t?”

The UPPERCASE letters in the first part of each of the five incomplete sentences below can be rearranged to form words that complete the sentence. The number of words needed to complete each sentence (and the number of letters in each word, along with the initial letter in each word) appear in parentheses at the end of each ellipsis...
Note: If  #1 is the only one you solve, consider yourself a winner!

1. You would never PUT SALSA into your cake batter, but you might put into it some... (one word, beginning with S: 8 letters).

2. You probably should ADD NO FRUIT OR FROSTED OAT FLAKES to your bowl of leafy greens, but you might want to instead put into it a... (six words, two pairs of them each connected with a hyphen: 4-5, 4-6, 5, 4). (F-T, F-T, S, F)

3. According to my GAL, HER HEFTY CHICKEN LIVERS NOODLE SOUP recipe does not call for sugar or chocolate chips, but she might instead put into her slow cooker either a... (seven words: 7-4, 5, 2, 4, 7, 5). (K-C, L, O, H, S, S)

4. You wouldn’t put tomato paste or garlic powder into either your preheated-more pineapple upside-down bundt cakes or your PREHEATED-LESS, FLOURY LATTICE-CRUST, PUMPKIN PIES, but you might instead put into them a... (six words: 5, 7-6, 12, 7, 5). (S, S-T, M, C, K)

5. A woman from Nezahualcóyotl would never add maple syrup to her SOUTHERN PAN-FRIED GREENS-VEGGIES WONTONS recipe, but you might instead find in her crock pot the...  (six words: 7, 6-5, 6, 7, 5). (S, P-H, F, S, T)

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, January 4, 2019

A resting place for weary bones; The Past of the Mohawkans; Nicens Baby Tuckoo meets a moocow; Two types of titles; Hosiery? No Sirree! Grocery! Rosary! “Ain’t no cure for the summertime barbecues!”


PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“Ain’t no cure for the summertime barbecues!”

Remove one letter from a brand name associated with summertime barbecues.
The result is the last name at birth and the eventual last name of a prominent American. 
Who is it?
What is the brand name?


Appetizer Menu

Note: We at Puzzleria! are pleased to feature the following “Cryptic” Appetizer puzzle created by our great friend Mark Scott of Seattle. (You may know him by his screen name, skydiveboy.
We have published several of Mark’s puzzles on Puzzleria!, including one of my all-time-favorites (about a poker player who is “all thumbs”) which I am linking to here
Thanks, Mark, for sharing your cleverness and creativity with us.

“Cryptic” Appetizer
A resting place for weary bones

There is a phrase/idiom that describes how exhausted one may be, and it is in four words.
Now switch the first and last words to come up with another, contrived, phrase that could apply to, and be heard at, a cemetery when preceded by the word “No.”
What is this phrase/idiom?
What is the contrived phrase?

Heavenly Pop Hit Appetizer:
Two types of titles

Name a three-word title of a popular hit record from the 1960’s. Remove from the third word a somewhat common preposition and replace it with the letters in a synonym of  “portents” – but first mix up the letters of this synonym. 
This altered three-world title now expresses the names of two rivals. (The first name is the first word in a two-word informal nickname.) 
These rivals shall presently compete for a type of title that is different from the title of this pop hit, or of any pop hit’s title.
What is the song title?
What are the names of the rivals?
Hint: The names of the rivals that you are seeking are identical except for their second and third letters.


MENU

Tribes And Tribulations Slice:
The Past of the  “Mohawkans”

In the 1600’s the Mohawks and other tribes in their confederation sought to expand their territory westward, so fought the Huron confederation tribes. 
Remove from a noun depicting these Mohawk battlers the letters of some weapons they brought to battle, leaving the first two letters of the name of their confederation. 
What are the name describing these Mohawks, their weapons, and the name of their confederation?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Nicens Baby Tuckoo meets a moocow

Will Shortz’s December 30th  NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
What world capital becomes the informal name for a farm animal if you change its third letter?

Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:

ENTREE #1:
Name a world capital that becomes the first name of a certain lyricist and melody maker if you change its third letter. 
If you take this musician’s last name literally, the person with that first name is also a maker of large farm wagons. 
What is this capital?
What is the melody maker’s name?

ENTREE #2:
What world capital, if you change its third letter and divide the result in half, describes what a particular politician did in 1979-80, in a proper noun and past-tense verb.
What is this capital?
Who is the politician and what did the politician do?
Hint: Divide into two words the country of which this city is the capital. The result will be what the particular politician might have said about what he/she did in 1979-80.

ENTREE #3:
What world capital becomes the nickname of a former Minnesota Twins pitcher if you change its third letter? 
What capital becomes the profession of TC Bear (“TC” stands for “Twin Cities”) if you switch its two vowels and change one of them to an “o”? 

ENTREE #4:
Change the fifth letter of a world capital and divide the result in half. Change the last letter in the first half to a y”.
Now add a “t” to a synonym of “fake” or “insincere,” rearrange its letters and put the result between the two halves of the divided world capital. 
The result is a three-word category encompassing “Crunchy Frog,” “Spam,” or “The Dirty Fork.” 
What is this capital? What is the synonym?

ENTREE #5:
Remove the third letter from a world capital and rearrange the remaining letters.
If you have the right rearrangement, the result is an informal, somewhat jocular name for a judge without a robe who normally works outdoors. It is also the formal name of a zoo animal.
What are this capital and the name for a judge or zoo animal?

ENTREE #6: 
Change the eighth letter in a world capital.
The result is a caption for the image pictured here.
What are this capital and caption?



ENTREE #7:
A world capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal (roughly the same size as a moocow) if you change its second letter and replace its fourth letter with a duplicate of its third letter.
What are this world capital and farm animal name?

ENTREE #8:
What U.S. state capital becomes a stereotypical name for a farm animal if you change its fifth letter and replace its third letter with a duplicate of its fourth letter?

ENTREE #9:
A world capital becomes a terse dictionary entry, in three words total (like this one for the word terse), if you change its third letter and divide the result into three words of unequal length. 
What is this capital?

ENTREE #10:
What world capital becomes a collective term for frogs, biting bugs, or locusts, for example, if you change its second letter?


Dessert Menu

Sight And Sound Dessert:
Hosiery? No Sirree! Grocery! Rosary! 

Name something you might see where people buy groceries that sounds like something you might hear in the presence of rosaries. 
What might you see and hear?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.