Friday, July 12, 2019

“Which way to the sandbar?” Twain’s dialogue is not wan! “Harrumph!” and other triumphs of “Surprising! stumpery” Seeking a science of some substance; Swedes, Somalis, Vietnamese and other natives

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
“Which way to the sandbar?”

Phil fills his beer glass to the brim, but Prudence consumes alcohol in moderation, and thus preserves sobriety. 
Remove two identical letters from an nine-letter synonym of a verb in the above sentence to spell certain alcoholic beverages served at the beach. 
Remove two different identical letters from the same nine-letter synonym to spell other things seen at the beach, in two words.
What are these beverages and other things?


Appetizer Menu

River, Phoenix, Scrootched, Appetizer:
“Harrumph!” and other triumphs of “Surprising! stumpery

Harrumph!
1. Several verb forms (scrounged, screeched) and plural nouns (strengths, straights) are among the longest one-syllable words in English, at 9 letters. But there is a longer, fairly frequently used word that in the usual American English pronunciation has only one syllable. What is this word?
Hint: There are two spelling variants: 10 or 11 letters.

Surprise!
2. What unexpected geographic fact characterizes the state of California?
Hint: It is not that California has the largest population, or that the highest and lowest elevations in the 48 contiguous states are located there.

Discharged
3. Think of two state capitals that share a number of letters. Take the fourth letter of each and insert it after the second letter. Then insert a copy of the second letter where this fourth letter had been. Next, delete the unit of charge contained in each resulting set of letters. 
Now combine the remaining letters from the two sets and rearrange three ways to give an article or pronoun and the Olympic abbreviations for three countries. What are these state capitals and countries?
Split to avoid confusion
4. Think of a state capital. Add a letter before the final letter and split this result into the two-word name of a county seat in the same state as the capital. What are the state capital and county seat?

A river runs through it (Part 1)
5. Of the 50 US states, just over half share a characteristic with one or more rivers that run through or border them. What is this characteristic?

A river runs through it (Part 2)
6. Less than half of these states (in Part 1) fulfill an even narrower criterion. What is the “tighter” criterion in these states?



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Adjectival Slice
Twain’s dialogue is not wan!

Some readers use a five-letter adjective to characterize some dialogue in a particular novel. 
Remove two letters from the author’s last name. 
The letters that remain, in order, will form a six-letter synonym of this adjective. 
What are this adjective, novelist and synonym?

Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices:
Swedes, Somalis, Vietnamese and other natives

Will Shortz’s July 7th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, an earlier draft created by Joseph Young of St. Cloud, Minnesota, who runs the blog Puzzleria!, reads: 
When you remove the final letter from Germany, Sweden or Somalia what remains is a word for someone born there. What country, if you remove its final letter, forms a word for someone born there – but only after you rearrange its remaining letters?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz And Young Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Give the name for a person born in a particular U.S. state. Rearrange the letters of this name to form a two-part name for a person living in a neighboring state. The first part of this name is the neighboring state itself; the second part of this two-part name is a three-letter abbreviation for an inhabitant of that state, or any state for that matter.
What is the name for the person born in the U.S. state? What is the two-part name for a person living in a neighboring state?
ENTREE #2:
Give the name for a person born in a particular U.S. state. Rearrange the letters of this name to form a two-word caption for the silhouetted image pictured here.
What is the caption? What is the name for a person born in this U.S. state?
ENTREE #3:
Give the name for a person born on a particular island that is a part of a European country. Rearrange the letters of this native person’s name to form the name of a beverage associated with the ancient “history” of the country. 
What is the beverage? What is the name for a person born on the island?
ENTREE #4:
Give an informal two-word name for a person born in a particular U.S. state. Rearrange the letters of this name to form a material from which a particular article of apparel is often manufactured. 
The second word in the two-word name for the person born in the state is a part of this article of apparel. 
What is the two-word name for the person? 
What is the material from which the article of apparel is manufactured?
ENTREE #5:
Give the name for a person born in a particular U.S. state. Rearrange the letters of this name to form a two-word caption for the image pictured here. 
What is the caption? What is the name for a person born in this U.S. state?
ENTREE #6: 
Give the name for a person born in a particular U.S. state. Rearrange the letters of this name to form a description of the state of the municipalities in the state during winter months. The description consists of  a plural noun beginning with C, a preposition beginning with I, and a noun beginning with S. 
What is the name for a person born in this U.S. state? What is the three-word description?


Dessert Menu


Nerd-Alert Dessert:
Seeking a science of some substance

Of all the sciences, which sounds like it is more substantial than any of the others?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, July 5, 2019

The Puzzlemaster prescribes... Simple lessons in making jeweled stetsons; She drove in through the bathroom window; In the wake of Fouthgoing fireworks; “Mystifife me, Nelson-Riddle, me, befiddle me with bemusic!”

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED

Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Simple lessons in making jeweled stetsons 

What do the following five phrases have in common?
Hotel bill
Simple lesson
Jeweled stetson
Grilled muffin
Floral print's tone



Appetizer Menu

Tough Conundrums To Beat Appetizer:
“Mystifife me, Nelson-Riddle, me, befiddle me with bemusic!”

🥁1. This doctor is the nemesis in a cartoon series, and this Master of Ceremonies is the stage name for a recording artist. Together, they form a technique for playing the banjo.

🥁2. Think of an American musical instrument brand in five letters. Shift each letter twelve places later in the alphabet to name an Asian animal.

🥁3. Think of a fictional substance in one word. The first seven letters can be split into the first and last names of a British musician.


🥁4. Think of four words that can be taken in groups of two to make the following two-word phrases: 1. The name of a deceased celebrity; 2. The name for something that might have formed whenever this celebrity was in public; 3. The brand name of a candy; 4. The name for a feature of some sheet music; 5. The name for another feature of sheet music; 6. Something needed to keep track of a certain type of customer’s purchases.



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Fife And Drummond Corps(e) Slice:
In the wake of Fouthgoing fireworks

Here are a pair of Fourth of July-themed sparkling sticklers for you to “fire-crack”:
1. Change the first letter of the last name of a French composer to a different consonant. (The French helped the United States defeat the British in the American War for Independence.) Reverse the order of the first three letters of this result. Remove the next two letters, and place the remainder of the composer’s name after the reversed letters. The result is the first name of a person well associated with the founding of the newly independent nation in 1776. The two letters you removed are also well associated with that founding.
Who is this French composer?
 2. (Warning: Fake news ahead!) At the 30-month mark of his tenure as president, Donald Trump orders his Cabinet officials and other staff to complete answers to a survey regarding internal White House communications and interactions. 
One question on the survey reads: Has the vice president assisted POTUS in his decision-making process? 
The overwhelming majority of the responses were identical! They consisted of four words: 
 “_ _ _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _...?   _ _ _!   _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _!” beginning with P, A, N and P. 
The 21 letters of the response can be rearranged to form the following traditional event that many Americans attend on the Fourth of July:
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _   _ _ _   _ _ _ _ _ _,  beginning with an I, D and P.
What are this response and event?

Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
The Puzzlemaster prescribes...

Will Shortz’s June 30th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
There is a standard two-letter abbreviation for an English word that has an unusual property: The first letter of the abbreviation is the second letter of the word. And the second letter of the abbreviation does not appear in the word at all. What’s the word, and what’s its abbreviation?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
There is a standard two-letter abbreviation for an English word that has an unusual property: The second letter of the abbreviation is the third letter of the word. And the first letter of the abbreviation does not appear in the word at all. What’s the word, and what’s its abbreviation?
ENTREE #2:
Find a one-letter abbreviation for a two-word statistical term. The abbreviation is actually a Greek letter, but we are requiring you to name its counterpart in the Roman (Latin) alphabet. The one-Roman-letter abbreviation is the first letter in the first word of the statistical term. The second word of the scientific term rhymes with the final four syllables of “abbreviation.” What is this statistical term?
ENTREE #3:
There is a three-letter abbreviation for an English word that has an unusual property: None of its three letters appear in the word at all. What’s the word, and what’s its abbreviation?
Hint: If you say the the three letters of the abbreviation aloud, it sounds pretty much like a possible crossword puzzle clue for “Kim Basinger.”
ENTREE #4:
Find the answers to the six clues below. Each answer is two words long. Each two-word answer can be anagrammed to form an English word and its standard two-letter abbreviation. 
Find the two-word answer to each clue.
Name what English word along with its standard two-letter abbreviation can be anagrammed to form it.
Clues:
A. Tegan and Sara, Indigo Girls or Garfunkel and Oates, for example
B. Ernie or Bert (refer to image)
C. Uni-, Tri- and hetero-, perhaps
D. What Tarzan do when Boy’s sister slip and plummet from greased grapevine 
E. Airheads, Hubba Bubba or Adams product, all packaged in bright red wrappers
F. Like James Hardin or Steph Curry when they’re “in the zone”.... or, Chicago in 1871 after a cow got frisky
ENTREE #5: 
A. When Father Murphy prays his breviary he dons a white linen vestment. 
What is it called and how much does it weigh?
B. By what quantity does the deli sell center cuts of kielbasa sausage or Colby cheese?
ENTREE #6:
Twelve months after the birth of their twin girls, mom and dad bring these two toddlers back to the children’s hospital for a routine annual check-up. The parents are bemused, however, when during the check-in preliminaries they overhear some medical staff members refer to their daughters with the name of a particular toy with which their 6-year-old son happens to be playing in the waiting room. What is this toy? 


Dessert Menu


Rx (Take that!) Dessert:
She drove in through the bathroom window

Name a brand found in the bathroom. 
Changing the first letter and saying the result aloud sounds much like three words: two words you might see on a roadside sign, and one word for other things you usually see on the roadside. 
What is this brand?

Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)


Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.


We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.


Friday, June 28, 2019

Let’s get cracking... open; Desperately seeking safety; Send warriors, guns and wampum; There ain’t no cure for the summer sausage cordon bleus; Hat trick, and four other head-scratchers;


PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED


Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Send warriors, guns and wampum

A bow and arrow, spear or tomahawk may or may not be found in certain Native American dwellings. 
Name a weapon always found in such dwellings.  

Appetizer Menu

State Capitals And World Music... To Your Ears Appetizer:
Hat trick, and four other head-scratchers

Hat trick 
1. Think of a state capital. Change the silent letter to an E. Then change the last letter to either (1), the next letter in the alphabet; or (2), the next vowel in the alphabet.
Rearrange result (1) to give the state capital of a second state and a name for a body part. Rearrange result (2) to give the state capital of a third state and a different body part. What are the three state capitals and two body parts?

The last stand (a 3-part puzzle) 
2. Solve the  three parts, below:
1. Which US states cannot be anagrammed from any combination of other US states, using for the set of source letters as many states as necessary, but no individual state more than once, and neglecting leftover letters?
2. Add to this source set the set of US state capitals. Using the expanded set, what additional state(s) from Part 1 now can be anagrammed?
3. One state remains “un-anagrammable” after Part 2. Anagram this state from a former US possession and the postal abbreviation of one US state (which are, of course, included in the state name). Neglect leftover letters. 

Three. Part. Quiz. 
3. In the USA, one state, one territory, and one state capital each have one syllable, when correctly pronounced. What are they?

The best compliment 
4. What is the best compliment that one can receive about one’s competence in speaking a foreign language? (Of course, the compliment can be formulated in many ways, each expressing the same essential idea.)

Gee, this sounds familiar... 
5. The following compositions from popular and classical music all share something, both within and between categories. What is it?
Pop:
“Who Let the Dogs Out”
“Macarena”
“The Ballad of the Green Berets”
“Dominique”
Classical:
“Prince of Denmark’s March” (“Trumpet Voluntary”), frequently used at the end of weddings.
“Te Deum” (Charpentier) Intro to Eurovision internationally-networked TV presentations in Europe
“Canon in D” Pachelbel’s Canon, very popular in 1980s
“Fanfare-Rondeau” Theme to “Masterpiece Theater” and used at many weddings


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Monster-Sized Slice:
Desperately seeking safety

Take a word describing a movie monster. 
Move a letter in the word one place later on in the alphabet to name where those fleeing the monster might seek safety. 
What are these words?

Riffing Off Shortz And Matthews Slices:
Let’s get cracking... open

Will Shortz’s June 23rd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle, created by James Matthews of Little Rock, Arkansas, reads: 
To solve this puzzle, you might need to crack open an atlas. Take the names of two countries that share a border. Drop the second letter from the second country’s name. The resulting string of letters, in order from left to right, will spell a regular, uncapitalized word. What is it?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz and Matthews Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Take the names of a U.S. state and a country with which it does NOT share a border. Replace five consecutive letters in the state with an “r”. Drop the even-numbered letters in the country. The resulting string of letters, in order from left to right, will spell the first and last names of a singer. What are the state and country?
Hint: The country cannot be found in some lists of countries.
ENTREE #2:
Take: 
1.) a word describing Janis Joplin’s, Rod Stewart’s or Louis Armstrong’s voice,
2.) a country, and
3.) a word that follows Silent or Southern.
The resulting string of letters, in order from left to right, will spell the title of a 1980’s hair-metal album sandwiched between the two syllables of the title of of a book/movie about a raccoon. If you drop the first three letters of this resulting string of letters you will get an adjective that describes a fire starter.
What is this string of letters.
ENTREE #3:
Take: 
1.) a country,
2.) another country, and
3.) a creature.
The resulting string of letters, in order from left to right, will spell:
1.) the first name of a smiler,
2.) a creature, and
3.) a large number.
What is this string of letters.
ENTREE #4:
Take a 5-letter word for a period of time. Divide it into two parts. 
Place a string of five letters after the first part to spell a country. Place the same string of five letters before the second part to spell a biblical figure. 
What are this time period, country and biblical figure? 
ENTREE #5: 
To solve this puzzle, you might need to crack open an atlas. Take the name of a college in a borough of London, in two words, and the name of what Londoners might spread on their crumpets, in one word. 
Rearrange the letters of these three words to spell the first and last names of a puzzle-maker.
Now rearrange the letters of this puzzle-maker’s hometown and state to spell an an extremely rare and exotic item you might see on a menu in a California restaurant.
(Hint: Take the last two words of the exotic menu item. Replace the first two letters with a P to get an extremely common and unexotic item you might see on a menu.)
Who is this puzzle-maker and where does this puzzle-maker live? 


Dessert Menu

Simmerin’ Summertime Sustenance Dessert:
There aint no cure for the summer sausage cordon bleus

Name two words used, often one after the other, to describe summer. 
Place the name of a body part before the first word and a slang term for that body part after the second word to name a food associated with summer. 
What is this food?

 Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

Friday, June 21, 2019

Old (MacDonald’s) Navy; Play this dating game; Oh oh! Oops! No goofs or Boo-Boos; Sue falls for Lou Rawls! Full-fontal typography

PUZZLERIA! SLICES: OVER 8!/21 SERVED



Schpuzzle Of The Week:
Play this dating game

Name five consecutive letters of the alphabet, all associated with dating. 
Each letter is sometimes followed by a period. 
What are these five letters and how are they associated with dating.


Appetizer Menu

Seven Tough-To-Beat Conundrums Appetizer:
Full-fontal typography

🥁1. WEDDING INVITATIONS: 
Think of a typographic term containing three T’s. Drop one T to name a form of capitalization. Drop another T to name something used in old-fashioned typesetting. Drop the final T to leave what sounds like a word used in a four word phrase synonymous with marriage.
🥁2. Think of a two-word typography phrase. Drop the last letter from each word, and append a number to the second word, to get the name of a well-known criminal.
🥁3. Take the second word from Conundrum #2, reverse it, and append a typographic unit of distance to name a well-known transportation company.
🥁4. Name a singular eleven letter word that contains five consecutive consonants and has “I” as its only two vowels (where Y is considered a vowel). 
I have two answers.
🥁5. Name a department store in nine letters that contains five consecutive consonants and has only two of the same vowel (where Y is considered a vowel).
🥁6. Think of a type of noodle. Change the first letter to the next two letters in the alphabet to name a flower part.
🥁7. This puzzle is a sort of a word ladder. Start with a short word and at each step successively add a letter to answer the next clue. 
The words are, a type of: 1) Club 2) Road 3) Party 4) Bird 5) Image.


MENU

Edible Ears And Spoonfuls Of Spumoni Slice:
Oh oh! Oops! No goofs or Boo-Boos

Solve for the following clues. 
The letters and numbers in parentheses stand for the first letter and number of letters in each word.
Clues:
1. Portable party-tune blaster (B7)
2. Sweeper storage, and its shape (O6, B5, B3) 
3. Bromodosis (F4, O4)
4. Possible cause of halitosis (T5, R4, R3)
5. Slang term for a high-hit homer (M4, S4)
6. Slang term for “in the mood for love” (H3, T2, T4)
7. Hundred Acre Wood denizen (R3, O2, P4)
8. Big spoonful of Spumoni or Neapolitan (C4, S5)
9. Mesa or Salt Lake City (M6, T5)
10. Count Dracula encounterer, perhaps (B5, D5)
11. Pyrite (F5, G4)
12. “Effigetical pin cushion” (V6, D4)
13. Title of a biography of a beloved circus performer? (C8, O2, B4)... or usung the superior alternative answers suggested by geofan, (C9, O2, B4) 
14. What you heard after the Beatles’ breakup (B4, F3, Y4, O3)
15. Where recipes for “campfire casserole,” “meatball stew” and “boxcar burritos” can be found (H4, C8)
16. English, draw, topspin or “massé,” for example (P4, S4)
17. Convertible alternative (M8)
18.  Leopold’s wife, to those who know her well (M4, B5)
19. Early Elvis hit (H5, D3)
20.“Who Knows Where the Time Goes,” “Too Soon Tomorrow” and “Witchi-tai-to,” for example (F4, R4, S5)
21. Phil’s and Harry’s catchphrase (H4, C3)
22. Luke’s and Bo’s nemesis (B4, H4)
23. Edible ears (C4, O2, C4)
24. Places for college students to study and sleep (D4, R5)
25. New York Times daily challenges (S7, C10)
26. Group that found “gold” at the end of a “Neon Rainbow” (B3, T4)
27. O.J.’s ride, 25 years ago (F4, B6)
28. Elocution exercise phrase enunciated by Ron Burgundy (H3, N3, B5, C3)
29. Item on a fashion model’s appointment calendar  (P5, S5)
30. BBC Sci-fi program title character (D6, W3)
31. The 1978 Yanks, according to Sparky (B5, Z3)
32. Caption for the image at the right (Y4, L4)  


Riffing Off Shortz Slices:
Sue falls for Lou Rawls!

Will Shortz’s June 16th NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads: 
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme, respectively, with the first and last names of a famous singer. What city is it, and who’s the singer?
Puzzleria!s Riffing Off Shortz Slices read:
ENTREE #1:
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme, respectively, with a competitive team activity in which participants wear goggles. What city is it, and what is the competitive team activity?
ENTREE #2:
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. Reverse the order of the words. The two words of this result rhyme, respectively, with a compound word for a tool that features a “single helix.” What city is it, and what’s the tool?
ENTREE #3: 
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. 
The two words rhyme, respectively, with a two-word sentence for what your automobile engine will do if its cylinders do not receive the correct balance of air and fuel. 
The first word in the two-word sentence is a contraction.
What city is it, and what will your engine do?
ENTREE #4:
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word name. The two words rhyme, respectively, with something a recent prestigious prize winner is known for writing and recording, and what this winner wrote and recorded in June of 2017.  
What city is it, and who’s the writer and recorder?
What is the prize winner known for writing and recording, and what did the winner write and record in June of 2017?
ENTREE #5:
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. Replace one of its letters with the letter two places earlier in the alphabet to form a second major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. The two cities’ populations differ by about 40,000. 
What cities are these?
ENTREE #6:
Name a major U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a four-syllable name. The first syllable and the third and fourth syllables together rhyme, respectively, with the first and last names of a well-known short story title character. 
(The first name of the short story title character is a familiar one-syllable shortened form.) 
What city is it, and who’s the short story character?
ENTREE #7:
Name a major southern U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000. It has a two-word, two-syllable name. The first word rhymes, with the first part of a compound word that is a northwestern U.S. city, also with a population of more than 100,000. 
The second word of the major southern U.S. city rhymes with a synonym of the second part of that northwestern U.S. city. What cities are these?
Hint: The name of the northwestern U.S. city with a population of more than 100,000 is also the name of a northeastern U.S. city with a population of more than 50,000 but less than 100,000. The northwestern city was named after the northeastern city.


Dessert Menu

Dandy Dessert:
Old (MacDonald’s) Navy

Change one letter in a candy brand to form a two-word term for certain scarves, cravats, pajamas and stockings. 
Change one letter in just one piece of this same candy to name two words associated with certain farm animals. 
What is this candy brand?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.