Friday, May 5, 2017

Moon, June, croon tune… spoon; Hyd-rogain dye ox hide; What’s on the menu at “classy” Penn Avenue? Mixing up a baker’s dozen;

P! SLICES: OVER (65 + 432) SERVED

Welcome to our May 5th edition of Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! 

On Tuesday, May 9, 2017 we will be celebrating this blog’s third anniversary. Yes, Puzzleria! Puzzleria! that toddlin’tangletown is exiting its “terrible twos” and stumblin’ bumblin’ tumblin into its “thrilling and thriving threes.”

On our menus this week:
We’re serving up our second installment of puzzles that rip-off and riff-off Will Shortz’s NPR two-week creative challenge:
Three of these rip-offs require you to decipher three of my potential entries to Will’s challenge that I did not submit.
Nine other rip-offs ask you to spoonerize answers to clues to form song titles;
One final rip-off requires that you work backward and spoonerize a song title to form the answer to a clue.

And, in honor of our three-year milestone, we are serving up Three other puzzles:
1. An Hors d’Oeuvre that involves oxymorons, but that is not solvable by morons;
2. An Appetizer that may, or may not, involve a moron; and finally,
3. A Dessert with answer that may involve two morons…

But, as the Spaniards and Italians might say, “Inside every moron lies a heart of gold...” 
Gold? isn’t that the metal for gifts given on third anniversaries?

 Please enjoy celebrating Puzzleria’s! golden third anniversary with us by enjoying our puzzles. 

Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

Paradoxymoronic Hors d’Oeuvre:
Hyd-rogain dye ox hide

Name a phrase that might describe someone who doesn’t put on airs. Replace two consecutive letters in the phrase with two different letters to form an oxymoronic phrase.

What are these two phrases?
 
Hint: Each of the four letters in the two pairs of consecutive letters can be assigned a numerical value. The sum of the values of the “no airs” phrase’s two consecutive letters is roughly (597.28...) greater than the sum of the values of the “oxymoronic” phrase’s two consecutive letters.

Appetizer Menu

President’s Residence Appetizer:
What’s on the menu at “classy” Penn Avenue?

Name a three-word activity associated with Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. The second and third words sometimes appear together on a menu. 

Add an “n” to the end of the first of the three words to form a synonym of an adjective that many Americans might associate with that menu item.

What is this activity? 
What are the adjective and its synonym?       

MENU 

Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
Moon, June, croon tune… spoon!

Will Shortz’s April 23rd NPR Weekend Edition Sunday puzzle reads:
It’s the second week of a two-week creative challenge. … The object is to mashup the titles of past No. 1 hits on the Billboard 100 pop chart to tell a story. For example: “I Shot the Sheriff” “The Night the Lights Went Out in Georgia.” “The Morning After” “I’ll Be There” Leaving On A Jet Plane.”
Wikipedia has a list of the Billboard 100 No. 1 singles from the Hot 100 era, 1958 to present, which you can use. Your story can include up to seven song titles. …

Puzzleria’s Riffing/Ripping Off Shortz Slice reads:

# ONE:
To set up this rip-off puzzle, allow me to post the three “two-week creative challenge” entries I submitted to Will Shortz:
1. “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone” “Wannabe” “With Arms Wide Open,” “Beautiful Girls,” “Moves Like Jagger”… “With a Little Luck,” “Could've Been.”
2. “I’ll Be Missing You,” “Man in the Mirror.” “Who’s That Girl?” “It Wasn't Me.” “Still,” “It’s Gonna Be Me!”… “Kind of a Drag.”
3. “Royals,” “Down” “Angel” “Dark Horse,” “9 to 5.”  “Let’s Go Crazy,” “Kansas City!”

The answers to this “# ONE rip-off puzzle,” however, involve three of the efforts I did not submit to NPR.
The first answer was my fourth choice; the second answer also did not make my cut; and the third was unsubmittable because it simply did not follow Will’s rules.

Below, for each of my three non-entries, I provide a brief description of the story that is told by its “mashed-up” title. I follow this description with a parenthetical list of artists who performed the hit singles and the number of words in each title. Punctuation for the story is also provided.

ONE: A kibitzer admires the six cards his buddy has been dealt, encourages him to behave in a manner that would contradict his nickname, and expresses desire to get into the game himself.
(Phil Collins, 2 words), (Britney Spears, 1) (Rihanna, 1), (Steve Miller Band, 2)… (Bee Gees, 4), (Lady Gaga, 2). (The Beatles, 6).

TWO: A young woman makes a plea for assistance after trying the classified newspaper sections and bargain stores (and even resorting to “tossing coins in the fountain”) in a futile quest to obtain “a girl’s best friend.”
(The Beatles, 1 word)! (The Honey Cone, 2), (Macklemore & Ryan Lewis featuring Wanz, 2), (Terence Trent D’Arby, 2). (U2, 8), (Christina Aguilera, 4)… (Rihanna, 1)!

THREE: If, during a certain time in mid-afternoon or wee hours of the morning,” you happen to view the inverted reflection of a clock face, it will appear pretty much the same.
(Gary U.S. Bonds, 3) (Diana Ross, 1) (Michael Jackson, 4 words, but ignore the first word) (Barry Manilow, 5 words, but ignore the last three words) (Gary U.S. Bonds, 3).

# TWO:
The ten clues below might be hard nuts to crack. So, instead of using a nutcracker, try using a “spoon.” Yes, each answer is formed by “spoonerizing” two words from the title on the list of the Billboard 100 No. 1 singles from the Hot 100 era, 1958 to present.

Most of the song titles contain only two words, but a few may contain more than two.
For titles with more than two words, spoonerize only the two main words in the title:
For example, Bob’s Dylan’s “Most of the Time” song title from his “Oh Mercy” album could be spoonerized as “toast of the mime,” which might be clued by the illustration at the right.

If one of the two words to be spoonerized does not begin with a consonant (or consonant blend), simply transfer the initial consonant sound from one word to the other.
For example, the band Yes’s “Leave it” song from their “90125” album could be spoonerized as “Eve Lit,” which might be clued as “The Book of Genesis.”
The two numbers in parentheses after each clue indicate the number of words in the clue answer followed the number of words in the song title.
1.
Constable who monitors the alcoholic content of lemonade-with-beer mixed drinks (2-word clue answer, 2-word song title)
2.
“After you _____ an apple with a knife you will likely ____ whether a worm is within.” (2-word clue answer, 2-word song title, with the words connected by an ampersand)
3.
The caption for the image pictured at the right, below. (3, 2)  
4.
What the night watchman for a Bloomington, Minnesota tourist attraction needs
(2, 2)
5.
What determines what you must pay a newspaper for a display in its classified section (2, 2)
6.
Trash receptacle where disillusioned Barry Manilow fans can throw 45s, 8-tracks and cassettes of his first Billboard chart-topper (3, 3)
7.
“At the Reno Casino, _____ (the dealer in a Tom Fogerty song) cut the deck as the patrons placed their ____.” (2, 4)
8.
“Before he ______ ___, the first-time dater had to ______ up the courage to do so.” (3, 2)
9.
(The answer to this ninth clue, after you spoonerize it to form the song title, will be pronounced slightly different from the song title. The first word will not be the first word in the title (which is the first name the song’s title character) but will instead be a body part of that character that pertains to the song’s subject.)
The nickname of a former NBA basketball player who is the father of a future NBA Hall of Famer. The father’s nickname is also the generic name of a candy that helped a U.S. president kick his smoking habit. (2, 2)
10.
(For this tenth and final part to this puzzle, don’t spoonerize the clue-answer to find the song title; instead spoonerize the song title to find the clue-answer.)
The caption for any of four black & white images (that appear throughout this week’s blog), the first word of which is possessive. (2, 2)
Hint: The name of  the song’s artist is a single word that can be followed by “diabetes” or “delinquent.” 

Dessert Menu

Take Out Dessert
Mixing up a baker’s dozen

North Korea leader Kim Jong-un commissioned a production company to film a pilot for a North Korea sitcom titled “Mick’s Sick Tearoom,” a “Cheers” rip-off/wannabe. 

Kim insisted his cousin Kim Caste-roo be hired as casting director. Kim’s cousin cast an Eskimo actor as the sitcom’s star character Mick Tea-soor who prepares and serves the menu’s only two choices: hard-tack tacos or moist cake washed down, of course, with oolong tea.

Kim Jong-un’s history of bizarre crimes took a more bizarre turn, however, when his cousin “voluntarily” cast him in a sitcom skit (or “cameo,”as Kim preferred to call it) playing himself as a patron at Mick’s.

Improvising, the Korean leader ordered both menu items. Alas, a cook’s timer malfunctioned. Mick served Kim not moist cake but “soot-rim” cake and a taco smokier than normal. Kim took a bite of the irksome taco and went ballistic. In other words, he took “I scream, you scream…” to a whole new level of hysteria…

And he didn’t even order dessert!    

The text above contains thirteen related strings of either two or three consecutive words. The letters in each of these word-strings can be rearranged to form a single descriptive phrase (consisting of an adjective and noun) that has been in the news this past week.

What is this newsworthy phrase?


Every Friday at Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! we publish a new menu of fresh word puzzles, number puzzles, logic puzzles, puzzles of all varieties and flavors. We cater to cravers of scrumptious puzzles!

Our master chef, Grecian gourmet puzzle-creator Lego Lambda, blends and bakes up mysterious (and sometimes questionable) toppings and spices (such as alphabet soup, Mobius bacon strips, diced snake eyes, cubed radishes, “hominym” grits, anagraham crackers, rhyme thyme and sage sprinklings.)

Please post your comments below. Feel free also to post clever and subtle hints that do not give the puzzle answers away. Please wait until after 3 p.m. Eastern Time on Wednesdays to post your answers and explain your hints about the puzzles. We serve up at least one fresh puzzle every Friday.

We invite you to make it a habit to “Meet at Joe’s!” If you enjoy our weekly puzzle party, please tell your friends about Joseph Young’s Puzzleria! Thank you.

30 comments:

  1. Happy 3rd Anniversary, LegoP!master. I hadn't realized that when I first discovered this blog, it wasn't even a year old (i.e. around April 2015.)

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  3. Happy anniversary Lego! I didn't realize this blog has only been around three years! I surely would've thought it had been going longer than that. Congratulations! Good song title puzzles too! The only one I couldn't figure out was #9, about the NBA players and the candy. I also got the Dessert without really even scanning the whole text. Once you find the recurring anagrams, it saves time just to look them over. Hope you've had a bueno Cinco de Mayo! We ate out earlier, at a Mexican restaurant of course! Great flan! Never really had flan before, not even back in school in one of my Spanish classes when we actually had to prepare flan for the class! It's a bit rich, though. Have you ever tried it?

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    1. Thanks cranberry and ViolinTeddy for your congrats. I consider you two and our other Puzzlerians! as also worthy of a big pat on the back. As Al Jarreau once sang, "We're in this (Puzzling) Love Together."
      #9: The NBA son recently retired.
      I had never heard of flan until I took a summer study trip abroad in Chartres, France with a score of Minnesota collegians, studing French and the architecture of the Notre Dame de Chartres Cathedral. La Cathedral est tres jolie!
      We would often sample the bonbons and such at Chartres' confectioneries and patisseries. That's where most of us were introduced to flan. As I recall, we were not that impressed.
      As you said, cranberry, it's "a bit rich." I preferred the wines and, of course, the cheeses.

      LegoWhoAlsoPrefersFrenchSilkPieToFlannel

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    2. Toutes nos félicitations, Lego!

      Raising a croissant in your honor. . .

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    3. Merci, BoCoo, Word Woman. I too have always loved croissants... especially when they are toasted.

      LegoProposesToSay"FlakyButteryBottomsUp!"

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  4. Just solved this week's Sunday Puzzle. Can you believe they didn't include a list of runner-up entries? I feel cheated on this one! I know you're better than that, Lego, because you offer hints to those of us who may be having trouble. Speaking of which, I need help with those first two puzzles! I'm stumped!

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    1. Hints:

      PHO:
      The phrase might describe anyone/anything who/that is genuine.
      PRA:
      The three-word activity is an annual one that has a long history. It should probably be held in the Oval Office, but it isn't.

      LegoEditorializesThatThePHOPhraseDoesNotDescribeThePresentOvalOfficeOccupant

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  5. Where did you find the oxymoronic phrase? I can't seem to find one that would correspond with the original phrase. Is it too much to ask which letters may have to be changed, or is that giving it away?

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    1. cranberry,
      I recall that you have previously said, in effect, that numbers (as opposed to letters) do not exactly float your puzzle-solving boat. But, regardless of that, let us revisit my PHO Hint. (That's "PHO" Hint, not "FAUX" Hint.):
      "Hint: Each of the four letters in the two pairs of consecutive letters can be assigned a numerical value. The sum of the values of the 'no airs' phrase’s two consecutive letters is roughly (597.28...) greater than the sum of the values of the 'oxymoronic' phrase’s two consecutive letters."

      Yes certain letters do indeed have numerical values when comes to puzzling. For example, Will Shortz and we have often used the old "number that corresponds to a letter's place in the alphabet" ploy: A=1, B=2, C=3... Z=26.
      And, of course there are our friendly Roman numeric lumenaries I, V, X, L, C, D and M.
      In the Greek alphabet -- which, alas or luckily, does not come into play on our PHO puzzle -- pi stands for 3.14... and phi stands for 1.618...
      And, there is a pretty common letter in our own Latin/English alphabet that stands for another common mathematical constant.

      LegoUrgesThat"YouDoTheAlphabeticalMath"

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    2. I've been uncharacteristically silent, mostly because I'm not going to get any of the RIp Offs this week (so last week was my turn, pjb, and this week is yours!) It would take me forever to look up each and every one of those 'hit songs', and I simply don't have the time or the patience (and my eyes are both acting up...so using them isn't very pleasant.)

      However, thanks to the hint, I DID just solve the Appetizer (the relevant event hit me all of a sudden), and I had gotten the Dessert on Friday.

      I also know what the Hors D'O's one 'common letter's numerical value is, however, I have yet to figure out how to turn the two consecutive letters from the phrase I came up with (which I suspect is correct) into a subtraction difference as big as indicated. Indeed, although I think my oxymoron phrase probably isn't right, my difference ends up being only 17.28.

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    3. ViolinTeddy,
      The four different letters contained in the two pairs of consecutive letters all appear in the word "decimal."
      I infer that you probably have the consecutive letters in the "oxymoronic" word correct... you definitely have the "e" correct. I suspect you are using the "A=1, B=2, C=3... Z=26" method of assigning numerical values to letters. If so, use our old Roman friends' method instead.
      Hint: Walter Brennan

      LegoWhoWasUnderstudyToRichardCrennaWhoPlayedThePartOfOneOfTheLukes

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    4. Your statement about the letters being contained in 'decimal' is most interesting, because indeed, the phrase and the oxymoron that I wrote down conform to that requirement! (However, I'm still not really satisfied that my oxymoron makes much sense.) I will have to attack the letter numerical value situation (you gave it away above, about the 'e'....did you mean to do that?) I did try to come up with some types of valuations for letters OTHER than their alphabetical location, I just hadn't succeeded as of yet. Will see if I can figure out what your Walter Brennan hint means. Thanks

      Delete
    5. I gathered from your "17.28 difference" that you had already used the Euler number constant as one of your four consecutive letters.
      "RichardCrennaWhoPlayedThePartOfOneOfTheLukes" is an ancillary part of the Brennan hint.

      LegoWhoMissesBumPhillipsAndTheHoustonEulers

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    6. Well, I don't know what I'm doing wrong.....I did come up with an equation (not sure if there might be other ways to come out with the same 'difference' result), using the indicated Roman numerals, and yes, I did use "E" 's value. However, the way the equation works out, the phrase answers I'd already chosen can't be correct.....and I have no idea (despite searching for phrase synonyms) what other phrases to use. So it's extremely frustrating, and I've gone back and forth, wondering what I am not seeing.

      I also Googled Walter Brennan (I do have a vague memory of The Real McCoys, which is what I figure you were referring to), but thus far, whatever the connection is has not zapped into my brain.

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  6. I think the Walter Brennan hint helped me out with that puzzle, maybe more than VT.

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  7. Real McCoy > real decoy
    1000+100=500+2.72+597.28
    Dr. Leonard H. "Bones" McCoy

    Easter Egg Roll > oriental, Eastern

    Candy Shop > shandy cop

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    1. Paul,
      I had forgotten that "Bones'" surname was McCoy. Nice hint, now that I get it.
      LegoCries"BeamMeUpGrandpa!"

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  8. Hardly anything this week. I just SAW, above, the actual answer for the HORS D'O, and boy, do I feel like an idiot! I will leave in the phrases I had come up with, along with the equation, just for the heck of it.

    HORS D'O: DOWN TO EARTH => DOWN TO MIRTH? e = 2.72 MC = 1000 + 100 = 1100; D E = 500 + 2.72 = 502.72 DIFFERENCE = 1100 - 502.72 = 597.28.

    APPETIZER: EASTER EGG ROLL => EASTERN / CHINESE


    DESSERT: "KOREA SITCOM" "SICK TEAROOM" "KIM CASTE-ROO" "SOOT RIM CAKE" "TOOK I SCREAM" => "SMART COOKIE"

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  9. NOW, what I want to know, Lego, is: were you REALLy an understudy for Richard Crenna in something...or was that just Lego-babble?

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    1. Lego-babble, big-time.

      LegoWhoIsAlsoABigTimePurveyorOfFakeNews!

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  10. Hors d'Oeuvre
    REAL McCOY, REAL DECOY
    Appetizer
    EASTER EGG ROLL, EASTERN EGG ROLL
    Ripoffs
    ONE 1. TWO HEARTS/3/DIAMONDS/THE JOKER/YOU SHOULD BE DANCING/POKER FACE/I WANT TO HOLD YOUR HAND
    2. HELP!/WANT ADS/THRIFT SHOP/WISHING WELL/I STILL HAVEN'T FOUND WHAT I'M LOOKING FOR/WHAT A GIRL WANTS/DIAMONDS!
    3. QUARTER TO THREE/UPSIDE DOWN/(MAN)IN THE MIRROR/LOOKS LIKE(WE MADE IT)/QUARTER TO THREE
    TWO 1. CANDY SHOP(shandy cop)
    2. NICE & SLOW(slice & know)
    3. RUNAROUND SUE(sun around Roo)
    4. CALL ME(mall key)
    5. SAD EYES(ad size)
    6. THE CANDY MAN(the "Mandy" can)
    7. BENNIE AND THE JETS(Jenny, bets)
    8. MR. CUSTER(kissed her, muster)
    10. SLOW MOTION(Moe's lotion)
    Dessert
    SMART COOKIE(Korea sitcom, Mick tea-soor, or moist cake, etc.)
    MY LOVE/I'M LEAVING IT UP TO YOU/IF YOU WANNA BE HAPPY/LISTEN TO WHAT THE MAN SAID/IT'S ALL IN THE GAME/WE CAN WORK IT OUT/OUR DAY WILL COME-pjb

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  11. I still can't believe Will didn't include some of the best runner-up entries in that two-week challenge. Here's a few I came up with and sent in. Hope you enjoy them:
    1. ANGIE BABY/I'M TELLING YOU NOW/IF YOU LEAVE ME NOW/WE ARE NEVER EVER GETTING BACK TOGETHER/YOU GIVE LOVE A BAD NAME/I'D DO ANYTHING FOR LOVE(BUT I WON'T DO THAT)/HELLO GOODBYE
    2. HELP ME RHONDA/I WANT TO KNOW WHAT LOVE IS/HOW WILL I KNOW/WHEN I NEED YOU/WHAT'S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT/THAT'S WHAT FRIENDS ARE FOR/EASIER SAID THAN DONE
    3. EVERY BREATH YOU TAKE/YOU'VE LOST THAT LOVIN' FEELIN'/COME ON EILEEN/(YOU'RE)HAVING MY BABY/WHATEVER GETS YOU THROUGH THE NIGHT/I CAN HELP/YOU AIN'T SEEN NOTHIN' YET
    4. TIME AFTER TIME/WHEN I'M WITH YOU/LOST IN YOUR EYES/I'M SORRY/MY HEART HAS A MIND OF ITS OWN/I GOTTA FEELING/MY LIFE WOULD SUCK WITHOUT YOU
    5. BILLIE JEAN/AIN'T IT FUNNY/EVERY TIME YOU GO AWAY/HOW YOU REMIND ME/YOU NEEDED ME/THE FIRST TIME EVER I SAW YOUR FACE/I KNEW YOU WERE WAITING(FOR ME)
    6. NEW KID IN TOWN/MOVES LIKE JAGGER/HIPS DON'T LIE/AT THIS MOMENT/IT'S NOW OR NEVER/DROP IT LIKE IT'S HOT/DANCING QUEEN
    7. DO YA THINK I'M SEXY?/STILL/HOT STUFF/BABE/I WILL SURVIVE/TRAGEDY/KNOCK ON WOOD
    8. DON'T FORGET ABOUT US/IN DA CLUB/YOU SHOULD BE DANCING/MAMA TOLD ME(NOT TO COME)/I GOTTA FEELING/I'LL BE THERE/IT'S STILL ROCK'N'ROLL TO ME
    9. I'M TELLING YOU NOW/DON'T GO BREAKING MY HEART/IF YOU LEAVE ME NOW/I SWEAR/WHAT GOES AROUND...COMES AROUND/WEST END GIRLS/TAKE MY BREATH AWAY
    10. THE FIRST TIME/THE WAY WE WERE/COMING UP/COMING OUT OF THE DARK/SAILING/UPSIDE DOWN/GRAZING IN THE GRASS
    I should have at least got honorable mention. What do you think?-pjb

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    1. Very nice, Patrick. Thanks for sharing. I am sure some of these would have appeared on Will's honorable mention list, had he posted one.
      I especially like #1, #4, #6 AND #10, but all ten are solid.

      LegoWhoBowsToTheCreativityOf"Cranberry"

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  12. This week's official answers, for the record, Part 1:

    Hors d’Oeuvre Menu

    Paradoxymoronic Hors d’Oeuvre:
    Hyd-rogain dye ox hide
    Name a phrase that might describe someone who doesn’t put on airs. Replace two consecutive letters in the phrase with two different letters to form an oxymoronic phrase.
    What are these two phrases?
    Hint: Each of the four letters in the two pairs of consecutive letters can be assigned a numerical value. The sum of the values of the “no airs” phrase’s two consecutive letters is roughly (597.28...) greater than the sum of the values of the “oxymoronic” phrase’s two consecutive letters.
    Answer:
    RealMcCoy; real decoy
    Hint:
    M + c = 1,000 + 100 (in Roman numerals) = 1,100
    D + e = 500 (in Roman numerals) + 2.72 (Euler'snumber, rounded off) = 502.72
    1,100 - 502.72 = 597.28

    Appetizer Menu

    President’s Residence Appetizer:
    What’s on the menu at “classy” Penn Avenue?
    Name a three-word activity associated with Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, DC. The second and third words sometimes appear together on a menu.
    Add an “n” to the end of the first of the three words to form a synonym of an adjective that many Americans might associate with that menu item.
    What is this activity?
    What are the adjective and its synonym?
    Answer:
    Easter Egg Roll (held annually on the White House grounds)
    Eastern; Oriental (egg roll)
    (Easter + n = Eastern)

    Lego...

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  13. This week's official answers, for the record, Part 2: MENU

    Ripping Off Shortz Slices:
    Moon, June, croon tune… spoon!
    # ONE:
    The answers to this “# ONE rip-off puzzle" involve three of the efforts I did not submit to NPR.
    The first answer was my fourth choice; the second answer also did not make my cut; and the third was unsubmittable because it simply did not follow Will’s rules.
    Below, for each of my three non-entries, I provide a brief description of the story that is told by its “mashed-up” title. I follow this description with a parenthetical list of artists who performed the hit singles and the number of words in each title. Punctuation for the story is also provided.
    ONE: A kibitzer admires the six cards his buddy has been dealt, encourages him to behave in a manner that would contradict his nickname, and expresses desire to get into the game himself.
    (Phil Collins, 2 words), (Britney Spears, 1) (Rihanna, 1), (Steve Miller Band, 2)… (Bee Gees, 4), (Lady Gaga, 2). (The Beatles, 6).
    Answer:
    Two hearts, 3 diamonds, the joker... You should be dancing, Poker Face. I want to hold your hand.
    TWO: A young woman makes a plea for assistance after trying the classified newspaper sections and bargain stores (and even resorting to “tossing coins in the fountain”) in a futile quest to obtain “a girl’s best friend.”
    (The Beatles, 1 word)! (The Honey Cone, 2), (Macklemore & Ryan Lewis featuring Wanz, 2), (Terence Trent D’Arby, 2). (U2, 8), (Christina Aguilera, 4)… (Rihanna, 1)!
    Answer:
    Help! Want ads, thrift store, wishing well. I still haven't found what I'm looking for, what a girl wants... Diamonds!
    THREE: If, during a certain time in mid-afternoon or “wee hours of the morning,” you happen to view the inverted reflection of a clock face, it will appear pretty much the same.
    (Gary U.S. Bonds, 3) (Diana Ross, 1) (Michael Jackson, 4 words, but ignore the first word) (Barry Manilow, 5 words, but ignore the last three words) (Gary U.S. Bonds, 3).”
    Answer:
    Quarter to three upside down in the mirror looks like quarter to three.
    ("Man in the Mirror" - Man; "Looks Like We Made It" - We Made It)

    Lego...

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  14. This week's official answers, for the record, Part 3:

    # TWO:
    The ten clues below might be hard nuts to crack. So, instead of using a nutcracker, try using a “spoon.” Yes, each answer is formed by “spoonerizing” two words from the title on the list of the Billboard 100 No. 1 singles from the Hot 100 era, 1958 to present.
    Most of the song titles contain only two words, but a few may contain more than two.
    For titles with more than two words, spoonerize only the two main words in the title:
    If one of the two words to be spoonerized does not begin with a consonant (or consonant blend), simply transfer the initial consonant sound from one word to the other.
    The two numbers in parentheses after each clue indicate the number of words in the clue answer followed the number of words in the song title.
    1. Constable who monitors the alcoholic content of lemonade-with-beer mixed drinks (2-word clue answer, 2-word song title)
    Answer:
    Shandy cop;
    "Candy Shop"
    2. “After you _____ an apple with a knife you will likely ____ whether a worm is within.” (2-word clue answer, 2-word song title, with the words connected by an ampersand)
    Answer:
    Slice, know;
    "Nice & Slow"
    3. The caption for the image pictured at the right, below. (3, 2)
    Answer:
    Sun aroud Roo;
    "Runaround Sue"
    4. What the night watchman for a Bloomington, Minnesota tourist attraction needs
    (2, 2)
    Answer:
    Mall key;
    "Call Me"
    5. What determines what you must pay a newspaper for a display in its classified section (2, 2)
    Answer:
    Ad size;
    "Sad Eyes"
    6. Trash receptacle where disillusioned Barry Manilow fans can throw 45s, 8-tracks and cassettes of his first Billboard chart-topper (3, 3)
    Answer:
    The "Mandy" can;
    "The Candy Man"
    7. “At the Reno Casino, _____ (the dealer in a Tom Fogerty song) cut the deck as the patrons placed their ____.” (2, 4)
    Answer:
    Jenny, bets;
    "Benny and the Jets"
    8. “Before he ______ ___, the first-time dater had to ______ up the courage to do so.” (3, 2)
    Answer:
    Kissed her, muster;
    "Mr. Custer"
    9. (The answer to this ninth clue, after you spoonerize it to form the song title, will be pronounced slightly different from the song title. The first word will not be the first word in the title (which is the first name the song’s title character) but will instead be a body part of that character that pertains to the song’s subject.)
    The nickname of a former NBA basketball player who is the father of a future NBA Hall of Famer. The father’s nickname is also the generic name of a candy that helped a U.S. president kick his smoking habit. (2, 2)
    Answer:
    Jelly Bean;
    "Billie (belly) Jean"
    10. (For this tenth and final part to this puzzle, don’t spoonerize the clue-answer to find the song title; instead spoonerize the song title to find the clue-answer.)
    The caption for any of four black & white images (that appear throughout this week’s blog), the first word of which is possessive. (2, 2)
    Hint: The name of the song’s artist is a single word that can be followed by “diabetes” or “delinquent.”
    Answer:
    Clue answer: Moe's lotion
    Song title: "Slow Motion," by Juvenile

    Lego...

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  15. This week's official answers, for the record, Part 4:

    Dessert Menu

    Take Out Dessert
    Mixing up a baker’s dozen
    North Korea leader Kim Jong-un commissioned a production company to film a pilot for a North Korea sitcom titled “Mick’s Sick Tearoom,” a “Cheers” rip-off/wannabe.
    Kim insisted his cousin Kim Caste-roo be hired as casting director. Kim’s cousin cast an Eskimo actor as the sitcom’s star character Mick Tea-soor who prepares and serves the menu’s only two choices: hard-tack tacos or moist cake washed down, of course, with oolong tea.
    Kim Jong-un’s history of bizarre crimes took a more bizarre turn, however, when his cousin “voluntarily” cast him in a sitcom skit (or “cameo,”as Kim preferred to call it) playing himself as a patron at Mick’s.
    The Korean leader ordered both menu items. Alas, a cook’s timer malfunctioned. Mick served Kim not moist cake but “soot-rim” cake and a taco smokier than normal. Kim took a bite of the irksome taco and went ballistic. In other words, he took “I scream, you scream…” to a whole new level of hysteria…
    And he didn’t even order dessert!
    The text above contains thirteen related strings of either two or three consecutive words. The letters in each of these word-strings can be rearranged to form a single descriptive phrase (consisting of an adjective and noun) that has been in the news this past week.
    What is this newsworthy phrase?
    Answer:
    "Smart cookie"
    Anagramatical word-strings:
    Korea sitcom; Sick Tearoom; Kim Caste-roo; Eskimo actor; Mick Tea-soor; or moist cake; crimes took a; skit or cameo; a cook’s timer; soot-rim cake; taco smokier; irksome taco; took I scream

    Lego...

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  16. Very nice, Patrick. Thanks for sharing. I am sure some of these would have appeared on Will's honorable mention list, had he posted one.
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